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NOT YOUR EVERYDAY VALENTINE'S DAY: FLORISTS ESTIMATE SALES OF MORE THAN 140 MILLION ROSES

 ALEXANDRIA, Va., Feb. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Ever feel left out on Valentine's Day? Chances are you won't this year: the Society of American Florists projects 140 million roses and 160 million carnations will be sold on or around Valentine's Day 1993. That's more than one flower for every man, woman and child in the United States.
 What else is special about Feb. 14, 1993?
 -- More women than ever will be among those giving flowers this year.
 -- More carnations, tulips and other flowers will join roses in bouquets this Valentine's Day.
 -- More people will enjoy Valentine's Day longer -- Feb. 14 falls on a Sunday, meaning students and the weekday work force will probably kick off Valentine's Day the Friday before.
 Whatever happens, one thing won't change this Valentine's Day: when people say "I love you," they'll say it with flowers. According to a 1990 survey by the Gallup Organization, 50 percent of Americans believe flowers are the best "I love you" gift. Jewelry came in a distant second (28 percent) and no other item garnered more than 6 percent.
 Valentine's Day Extended
 The calendar throws consumers a curve-ball this year: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14, falls on a Sunday. Paul Bachman, retail florist and Society of American Florists' marketing chairman, says this means people need to order flowers early. "Valentine givers should call early to get the best selection and ensure prompt delivery."
 For people planning to send flowers to loved ones at their offices, this means planning well ahead. "For all intents and purposes, Valentine's Day begins Friday, Feb. 12, for the Monday to Friday, nine to five crowd," Bachman adds.
 What to buy -- and for whom
 If your budget doesn't allow buying the traditional dozen roses, consider a half-dozen or less, or try mixing in a few other flowers your florist may recommend, such as tulips or carnations.
 Remember when shopping at any florist, you're paying for more than just flowers. Service that's professional, personal and inspired enhances the value of your gift. A florist can help you craft an arrangement even if you don't know the names of the flowers you want. Tell them something about who you're sending flowers to -- florists are experts in impressing even the hard to please.
 -0- 2/4/93
 /CONTACT: Jennifer Sparks of the Society of American Florists, 703-838-5235/


CO: Society of American Florists ST: Virginia IN: SU:

SM -- NYVFNS6 -- 2699 02/04/93 07:06 EST
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Date:Feb 4, 1993
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