Printer Friendly

NO FUNNY BUSINESS IN BBC COMEDIES.

Byline: David Kronke Television Critic

BBC America tonight premieres two new British comedies that probably should have remained on their side of the Atlantic. First up is ``Hyperdrive,'' a futuristic comedy covering the exploits of a starship crew dispatched throughout the galaxy to convince other planets to build up ``new enterprise zones'' in England.

It's followed by ``Feel the Force,'' about two spectacularly inept cops. The characters on both shows are roundly incompetent, as is the execution of both series.

``Hyperdrive'' stars Nick Frost as Cmdr. Henderson, whose crew participates in such activities as ``Bring Your Clone to Work Day.''

Tonight, they need to coax one planet into outsourcing their services to England or they'll be tasked with an even lousier assignment.

When they offend grotesque aliens whose rituals involve awfully touchy-feely behavior, the aliens leave a beast on the ship, telling it, ``Kill them all!'' Which becomes an awful inconvenience when the ambassador from an isolationist planet comes on board.

Though there's an occasional amusing gag about technology run amok, ``Hyperdrive'' is more droll than funny and awfully cheesy, to boot. Weapons look like -- look like? heck, they are -- plastic sticks. Performances are uniformly broad; everyone seems to come from the ``Benny Hill'' school of acting.

Which is actually an improvement on the principal turns on ``Feel the Force,'' which stars Michelle Gomez and Rose Cavaliero as Sally Bobbins and Sally Frank, respectively, Edinburgh policewomen singularly unqualified for their positions.

Bobbins has rage issues -- she tasers witnesses -- while Frank is, simply put, so spectacularly clueless her mittens are still attached to her coat by string. They get as scared as schoolgirls in the pathology lab and on night assignments.

There's none of that dry British wit BBC America usually imports for our amusement. Why their long-suffering boss (Leigh Zimmerman) hasn't sacked them is anyone's guess. She'd be putting herself -- and us -- out of our misery.

David Kronke, (818) 713-3638

david.kronke@dailynews.com

HYPERDRIVE - Two stars

What: Sci-fi sitcom about a starship crew trying to convince other planets in the galaxy to outsource services to England.

Where: BBC America.

When: 10 tonight (time may differ for satellite subscribers).

In a nutshell: More droll than funny.

FEEL THE FORCE - Two stars

What: Incompetent cops bumble through cases.

Where: BBC America.

When: 10:40 tonight (time may differ for satellite subscribers).

In a nutshell: Not even all that droll.

CAPTION(S):

photo

Photo:

A starship crew travels the galaxy to convince other planets to outsource their services to England in the sci-fi sitcom ``Hyperdrive,'' tonight on BBC America.
COPYRIGHT 2007 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2007, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Jan 19, 2007
Words:427
Previous Article:HAMPTON'S IS WORTH THE WAIT.
Next Article:DUPUIS PLEADS GUILTY FORMER GENERAL MANAGER OF HAAS AUTOMATION CONSPIRED IN FRAUD.
Topics:


Related Articles
The TV Sales Co.: how the small can act big.
THE HYPE DIAMONDS ARE A QUEEN'S BEST FRIEND.
'GENTLEMEN' OFFERS BRITS AT THEIR FUNNIEST.
DVD REVIEWS A 'POOL' FILLED WITH INTRIGUE.
All the queen's madmen: the two comedians behind Little Britain create a wide range of wacko characters, including "the only gay in the village".
Are Americans good at copying British TV shows?
HOLIDAY VIEWING.
Chappelle's show comes to campus.
TIME TO SHINE COMIC STAR STEVE CARELL BASKS IN `SURREAL' SUCCESS.
`SAXONDALE' NOTHING TO GET ANGRY ABOUT.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters