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NEWS LITE : NAMES IN THE NEWS COLLEGE MAY HONOR SKELTON WITH EDIFICE.

The Clem Kadiddlehopper Room? The Freddie the Freeloader Foyer?

Well, first they have to decide whether they're naming anything after Red Skelton. The trustees of Indiana's Vincennes University will be asked Oct. 6 to approve construction of an auditorium named after the comedian who died Sept. 17.

The Red Skelton Performing Arts Center would be an excellent way to recognize the Vincennes-born comedian's success and his contributions to the world, said school President Phillip M. Summers.

``This would be more than just an auditorium,'' Summers said Thursday. ``It could be a place where some of his memorabilia could be displayed. We laughingly said we could name some rooms for some of the characters he played.''

For several years officials at the state-run junior college, which gave Skelton an honorary doctorate in 1963, have discussed building a larger campus auditorium.

``It just seems the person (to honor) of all the people who have been associated with the university, that Red Skelton would be the one,'' Summers noted. ``He was a performer, an artist, he composed music, he loved to read and he just did all the types of things we want students to do.''

Sir Paul rebuffed by by beef-eating Kohl

That knight of the round platter, Sir Paul McCartney, tried to turn Chancellor Helmut Kohl into a vegetarian, but instead got a stomach-turning cookbook by Germany's leading meat-eater filled with his favorite beef and pork recipes.

The former Beatle had sent Kohl a copy of the vegetarian cookbook ``Veganissimo'' in July and urged the burly chancellor and his wife to join Germany's four million vegetarians.

But, as an exchange of letters released last week shows, Kohl was not convinced.

``Cookery, like life in general, depends upon the right balance,'' he wrote to McCartney in August, sending along a copy of a cookbook filled with meaty dishes, ``A Culinary Tour of Germany,'' which he and his wife, Hannelore, had co-authored.

By the way, ``Kohl'' translates into English as something that would seem to predispose the chancellor to vegetarianism: ``Cabbage.''

U2, their fans find Greek border a drag

Striking customs officers relented Friday and allowed 32 trucks carrying equipment for U2 into the country, but hundreds of vehicles remain stranded on Greece's northern borders for a second day.

The initial refusal to allow the trucks to cross the frontier from Bulgaria nearly led to the cancellation of Friday night's concert in the northern port city of Salonica.

More than 60,000 people bought tickets for the rock band's concert, part of Salonica's celebrations as Europe's Cultural Capital for 1997.

Hundreds of U2 fans from Turkey and neighboring Balkan countries were having problems crossing the border after customs officers said they could enter Greece on foot without their luggage.

The lawn and winding road

A 12-year-old boy who really wants to mow the lawn?

Well, not just any lawn. Ryan Tripp had planned to mow the White House lawn, but after traveling 3,116 miles on a riding lawn mower from Beaver, Utah, he had to settle for the lawn of the U.S. Capitol.

``They think they let one person in to do this, they have to let everybody,'' said Paul Smith, spokesman for Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. ``(But) I mean who the heck's going to be coming with another lawn mower?''

Ryan's 42-day journey was about more than cutting grass.

Tripp rode the lawn mower cross country to set a record and raise funds for 4-month-old Whitnie Pender, a Beaver girl in need of a liver transplant. His dad and grandparents kept him company, driving ahead and behind him.

He beat the world record - 3,034 miles, set in 1989 - in College Park, Md.

``All I can say is, what a way to get out of school,'' Hatch told Tripp Thursday when he met him in front of the capitol. Tripp missed the first five weeks of class while he was on the road.

``I do have a lot of homework,'' Tripp said.

She loves him; she loves him not

Rory Mueller wanted to get his wife, Connie, a gift a little more special than the usual dozen roses.

So he brought her a thousand of them: Red roses, pink roses, peach and yellow and white roses.

Fifty vases, each filled with 20 long-stem beauties filled the living room and spilled over into the kitchen, dining room, bedroom, bathroom and entryway.

It took floral manager Lisa Kriz and two assistants a day and a half to arrange the vases, and other shoppers got curious.

``There were a couple of women shopping with their husbands, and when they went back to tell them, they (the men) had this look on their faces, like `We have to compete with this?' '' Kriz said.

Reno supports

news biz

Attorney General Janet Reno may not always like what she reads in the newspapers, but she says she's still fond of them. Of course, it helps that her mother was a Miami News feature writer, her father covered police for The Miami Herald and her brother is a Newsday columnist.

``When you have a government so strong and so big, I think it's very important that the press be there to question and to shine their light upon all that affects the American people,'' Reno told the Newspaper Features Council and the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors on Friday.

Reno bucked family tradition - her grandfather and an aunt were also in the newspaper business - when she chose a legal career and applied to Harvard Law School, without telling her family.

She rose through a series of prosecutors jobs to become the first female U.S. attorney general. But Reno said her family's newspaper background - especially her mother's feature writing - continues to influence her legal career.

``You take a news story and it's oftentimes just the facts, ma'am,'' Reno told the newspaper editors. ``A good feature can take that news story, provide the continuity, place it in context and then personalize it so that readers of America come to understand far better.''

Reno said she was inspired by her mother's articles on the juvenile justice system and detention centers and she urged reporters and editors to focus on children's health and education.

``I think she understood that no matter what we did in other areas of government, we must remain invested in our children,'' Reno said of her mother.

CAPTION(S):

2 Photos

PHOTO (1) SKELTON

(2) Making an impression

Guitar legends Duane Eddy, Chet Atkins and Scotty Moore, from left, display dirty digits after making hand imprints in cement Friday in Nashville, Tenn. Their prints and signatures will be shipped to Los Angeles and be placed on display on Hollywood's Rockwalk.

Associated Press
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Copyright 1997, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Sep 28, 1997
Words:1118
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