Printer Friendly

NEWEST LESS INVASIVE TREATMENTS FOR HEART AND BLOOD VESSEL DISEASE PRESENTED AT INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS

 NEWEST LESS INVASIVE TREATMENTS FOR HEART AND BLOOD VESSEL DISEASE
 PRESENTED AT INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS
 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Feb. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Alternatives to major surgery for stroke prevention, irregular heartbeats and clogged arteries were demonstrated live to more than 500 physicians from around the world assembled at International Congress V, co-sponsored by the Arizona Heart Institute & Foundation (AHI&F) and the College of Angiology, held here this week.
 Among the advances presented at the Congress was balloon angioplasty of the carotid artery, which was demonstrated live at the meeting by Edward B. Diethrich, M.D., on a 77-year-old man suffering from periodic blindness due to the clogged vessel. Although this procedure presents a risk of stroke if plaque or clots dislodge and travel to the brain, Dr. Diethrich and his colleagues have had preliminary success with the technique. "In cases where an arterial lesion is inaccessible through endarterectomy (the traditional surgery for clogged arch vessels), carotid balloon angioplasty may represent a patient's best option. This is also true for patients who undergo endarterectomy and experience restenosis, because repeat surgical procedures increase morbidity and mortality," explains Diethrich.
 Another Congress highlight, an alternative to traditional open heart surgery for treating "reentrant" arrhythmia -- or rapid, irregular heartbeats -- was demonstrated by Thomas Mattioni, M.D., director of electrophysiology at AHI&F. Termed radiofrequency catheter ablation, the procedure burns tiny, match-head-size sears onto the excess or dead heart tissue responsible for the arrhythmia. According to Mattioni, "This therapy represents a tremendous step forward in the treatment of arrhythmia, allowing us to avert open heart surgery in patients who are already suffering from debilitating symptoms."
 Additional promising results involving stents -- tiny metallic scaffolds that hold blood vessels open following an intervention -- were presented at the Congress, including:
 -- Vein Grafts. Patients with restenosis (reclosure) of coronary bypass grafts can now undergo stent insertion, using the "Palmaz" stent, to reopen the graft by tacking back the flaps found on the interior of vein walls. This is a major advance in that it eliminates the need for further surgery.
 -- Aneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta. Use of new endovascular prosthetic devices (stents and a Dacron graft) permit the nonsurgical repair of an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta.
 -- Stenosis of the Abdominal Aorta. Major abdominal operations to correct narrowing of the aorta will soon be a procedure of the past. Patients with blockages in this one-inch diameter artery can now receive a Palmaz stent, thereby assuring high blood flow to the lower extremities.
 Commenting on a major randomized study on the use of stents in the pelvic arteries, Richard Heuser, M.D., director of research and education at AHI&F, explained, "The difference in renarrowing of the arteries in patients who had balloon angioplasty versus those who received a stent in addition to balloon angioplasty was dramatic. Clearly the stent was superior, even four years post-op."
 According to Diethrich, "While some the presentations at the Congress represented evolving treatments for cardiovascular disease, we are still concentrating on the use of such less invasive devices as balloon angioplasty, lasers, atherectomy devices and stents. However, our focus now is to maximize our results for patients by using combinations of techniques, such as lasers with stents, or balloons with clot-dissolving medication."
 Nearly 70 scientific papers and studies were presented at the four- day Congress, updating physicians on advances in the treatment arsenal for heart and blood vessel disease, which most attendees agreed are promising options, as they are less traumatic and allow rapid recovery and return to normal activity.
 Of the live, interactive exchange which hallmarks the AHI&F Congress, Diethrich said, "The important factor of the Congress is that it enables us to share our expertise with other physicians around the world who do not have access to the new technologies and to provide a real working forum for the advancement of new approaches to treating heart disease."
 -0- 2/19/92
 /CONTACT: Ellen French or Marcie Klein, of Robert Marston and Associates, 212-371-2200, for Arizona Heart Institute & Foundation/ CO: Arizona Heart Institute & Foundation ST: Arizona IN: MTC SU:


TS-KW -- NY022 -- 0371 02/19/92 11:00 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 19, 1992
Words:683
Previous Article:AMERICAN BUSINESS INFORMATION INITIAL PUBLIC OFFERING
Next Article:ROGER STAUBACH ELECTED TO BOARD OF LIFE PARTNERS GROUP
Topics:


Related Articles
POSITRON 'PET' SCANNERS PLAY MAJOR ROLE IN HEART DISEASE TREATMENT STUDY
STUDY SHOWS NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT HELPS ANGINA PATIENTS WHEN MEDICAL AND SURGICAL TREATMENTS FAIL
Target Therapeutics Receives CE Certification From European Community
Allegheny General Hospital Performs City's First Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Replacement Surgery
Medtronic Unveils Newest Product to Facilitate the Practice of Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: The Medtronic Octopus2.
Boston Scientific Announces Issuance of Key Gene Therapy Patent for Angiogenesis.
Boston Scientific announces issuance of key gene therapy patent for angiogenesis.
Clinical Data on New Eclipse Minimally-Invasive Laser Heart Procedure Published in Peer-Reviewed Journal.
Cordis Announces Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) Launch of Breakthrough Devices to Treat Artery Blockages in Leg.
FDA APPROVES BOSTON SCIENTIFIC'S CAROTID ARTERY STENT.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters