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NEW TECHNOLOGY FROM TI ENABLES NEXT-GENERATION COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT

 DALLAS, Sept. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- The days of "follow-you-anywhere" telephone numbers, interactive television and movies-on-demand are one step closer to home with the introduction of new semiconductor technology from Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN). In the near future, a majority of the phone calls made anywhere in the world will pass through Texas Instruments chips used in telephone switching equipment.
 All seven of the top worldwide communications equipment manufacturers use TI's earlier technology, which has become the industry's de facto standard, for switching their phone calls at current U.S. and European speeds of 155.52 megabits per second. Future communications innovations, however, have prompted TI to work closely with major telecommunications companies to create this new technology enabling data to be transferred at increased rates of 622.08 megabits per second and faster.
 This technology, which will be applied in telecom, networking and multimedia -- across the emerging asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) sector -- reduces power consumption by approximately 60 percent and offers benefits in system size and cost. These factors are important in accommodating the mammoth changes coming to the communications arena.
 Just as office computing started with 2,000-square-foot mainframes, switched to more powerful PCs -- connected primarily by software -- and moved toward internetworking, the interconnection devices of phone lines are becoming more powerful, shrinking in size and moving toward worldwide standards.
 "Recent breakthroughs in the communications industry provide worldwide standards in what was once a very secular, regional market," says Wally Rhines, TI vice president. "In response, our new technology enables companies to compete for the worldwide business of transporting not only voice, but huge amounts of video and computer data through fiber-optic telephone lines at reduced power consumption and lower system cost.
 "The telecommunications companies have told us that if they could design their entire systems based on 622.08 megabits per second, they could eliminate 75 percent of the space used in the typical switchgear system. Our technology makes this possible."
 High-level switching functions normally found on multiple chips have been combined by TI on a single chip. In the past, the large equipment boards found inside telephone switchgear boxes on street corners had to be spaced far apart for cooling. By reducing the numbers of chips on the boards, the boards are smaller, they consume less power and can be moved closer together. In addition, a smart-power manager turns off hip functions not in use at a given time further reducing system power consumption.
 "We were able to meet this challenge by working as a team with the telecommunications companies, sharing employees and desks to everyone's advantage," Rhines says.
 -0- 9/13/93
 /CONTACT: Melody Wolfe of Texas Instruments, 214-997-5470 (please do not publish this number)/
 (TXN) CO: Texas Instruments ST: Texas IN: CPR SU: PDT


TW -- NY018 -- 1147 09/13/93 09:17 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 13, 1993
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