Printer Friendly

NEW RESEARCH INDICATES LENGTH OF AIDS VIRUS SURVIVAL AFTER PATIENT'S DEATH

    EVERGREEN PARK, Ill., Nov. 16 ~PRNewswire~ -- Of vital importance to health care workers and funeral industry technicians is the survival period of the infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) after a patient's death.  Risk of contamination from infected blood or body fluids has been an extremely important consideration for those who work with deceased AIDS patients.
    To find answers to the question of HIV-1 life span, the Funeral Directors Services Association of Greater Chicago supplied blood samples and funded the testing required to initiate this research program.  They contacted researchers in the Department of Medicine (Section of Infectious Disease) and the Department of Immunology~Microbiology at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago who conducted the two-year-long research.
    Harold Kessler, M.D., Section of Infectious Disease, and director of the Coordinated AIDS Resource Center at Rush, presented the findings at the fall meeting of the American Society for Microbiology on Oct. 12, 1992.  "For unknown reasons, the viability of the virus appears to be time-dependent following death.  We were still able to isolate the virus up to 21.25 hours after a patient's death," said Dr. Kessler.
    The father-and-son team of Chicago Funeral Directors William and Joseph Herdegen, along with assistance from brother Funeral Directors Thomas and Jack Adams, were mainly responsible for providing the samples and time statistics from 41 deceased AIDS patients and delivering them to the medical center.  Researchers were able to recover HIV-1 from the blood of 21 of the 41 deceased patients up to 21.25 hours postmortem. None was found after that time period.  Refrigeration or non- refrigeration of the deceased did not significantly affect survival of the virus.
    To the best of researcher's knowledge, this study is the largest and most detailed analysis of the isolation and survival of HIV-1 from postmortem blood from AIDS patients.  The study was approved by the Human Investigation Committee of Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago.
    Researchers concluded that results of the study should be useful for health care workers and others exposed to postmortem blood from HIV- infected individuals and should lead to changes in processing practices of pathologists and funeral directors.  It proved that neither death nor refrigeration eliminated live virus from the blood, so care should be taken.  Only after a time period of approximately 22 hours was no virus found.
    "The implications of this data may prompt funeral directors to hold bodies of AIDS patients for at least 24 hours before their routine processing," says Dr. Kessler.  Kenneth P. Hein, president of the Funeral Directors Services Association of Greater Chicago, stated, "It's an area of AIDS study that none of the public health agencies had done any formal research on, so we felt it important knowledge that funeral directors and thousands of other health care workers needed to know."
    REFERENCE: Reported in the November 1992 issue of
               The American Medical Association's
               "Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine"
    -0-             11~16~92
    CONTACT:  Tom Moriarty of Funeral Directors Services Association, 708-423-6570 CO:  FUNERAL DIRECTORS SERVICES ASSOCIATION IN:  HEA ST:  IL


-- NY086 -- X384 11~16~92
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 16, 1992
Words:508
Previous Article:CALIFORNIA INDEMNITY CLAIMS-PAYING ABILITY LOWERED TO 'BBB-' BY FITCH -- FITCH FINANCIAL WIRE --
Next Article:THE READING TERMINAL MARKET CELEBRATES THANKSGIVING WITH TURKEY EXTRAVAGANZA
Topics:


Related Articles
AIDS: even in vivo, evolution persists.
HIV-2: a less virulent cousin of HIV-1.
AIDS update '96: new drugs, new tests, new optimism mark recent AIDS research.
Iowa VA hospital ignores federal ban, considers HIV-positive vet for liver transplant.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters