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NEW MOVIE COULD HURT JOB CHANCES OF DEFENSE DOWNSIZING VICTIMS

 Stereotype in Falling Down' Could Stigmatize 1.5 Million Seeking


Civilian Re-employment; Expert Encourages Warner Brothers to Signal
 That Defense Professional in Film is Not Typical
 WALNUT CREEK, Calif., March 1 /PRNewswire/ -- The new Warner Brothers film "Falling Down," which opened across America Friday, presents a "grossly unfair and inaccurate stereotype" of defense professionals that "may well do serious and lasting damage to the re-employment prospects of the 1.5 million individuals who will lose their jobs as a result of defense downsizing over the next few years," according to William Souveroff, executive director of the National Center for Career Change (NCCC).
 Souveroff expressed his concerns about "Falling Down" in a letter sent last week to the advertising and public relations department at Warner Brothers, which is distributing the movie starring actor Michael Douglas. The film centers around a laid-off defense professional who goes on a violent rampage after losing his job. Douglas portrays the main character, who is identified only by his vanity license plate letters: D-FENS. NCCC is dedicated to assisting defense industry, military and related government professionals with the often difficult transition to the commercial job market. Souveroff is the author of "The Defense Professional's Survival Guide for the 1990s."
 In his letter to Warner Brothers, Souveroff notes: "In my view, Falling Down' kicks defense workers while they are down and are going through their darkest hours. Given that these are the Americans who made the greatest contribution in recent years to guaranteeing America's security and making possible the end of the Cold War, your insensitivity and willingness to exploit their situation is regrettable. Even if Falling Down' is an important movie with important things to say, it would have been better if it had done so without imposing such a potentially devastating burden on the future of defense professionals, who constitute a valuable pool of educated and skilled talent that our nation will need if it is to master the economic and technological challenges of the 1990s."
 The Souveroff letter calls on Warner Brothers to take steps to minimize the extent to which the new film may "poison the minds of the civilian job market employers who will be the decision-makers about the re-employment" of those "now trying to deal constructively with the downsizing of their industry."
 -0- 3/1/93
 /NOTE: A facsimile copy of the Souveroff letter to Warner Brothers, background information about NCCC and the text of the Survival Guide are available by contacting Scott Staph at the numbers below./
 /CONTACT: William Souveroff, 510-837-6233, or Scott Staph, 703-276-1116, or after hours, 703-534-5348, both for the National Center for Career Change/


CO: National Center for Career Change ST: California IN: SU:

DS -- DC006 -- 1255 03/01/93 09:21 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 1, 1993
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