Printer Friendly

NEW INVESTIGATIONAL DRUG TESTED IN PATIENTS WITH BRAIN ANEURYSMS

 ACAPULCO, Mexico, Oct. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- A new drug therapy has been tested in patients with ruptured brain aneurysms, a leading cause of stroke, according to a report presented today at the Tenth International Congress of the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons by Dr. Neal Kassell, professor of neurosurgery at the University of Virginia.
 Results of the study, conducted by prominent neurosurgical centers in Australia, Western Europe and New Zealand, indicated that tirilazad mesylate at 6 milligrams per kilogram per day (mg/kg/day) compared to the placebo group decreased total mortality by 43 percent and improved "good recovery" by approximately 21 percent by Glasgow Outcome Score, assessed three months after the ruptured aneurysm. The drug also decreased vasospasm by 28 percent and reduced the need for expensive and hazardous hypervolemic hypertensive rescue therapy by 44 percent.
 Vasospasm is the narrowing of blood vessels at the base of the brain, which cuts off the supply of blood to brain cells. It often occurs as an after-effect of a ruptured aneurysm, in which the wall of a vessel swells into a balloon-like pocket filled with blood, then bursts. A patient who survives a brain hemorrhage from a ruptured aneurysm with no serious damage still may be stricken days later with vasospasm. The mortality associated with vasospasm can be as high as 20 percent in the first 24 hours.
 Tirilazad mesylate is the first member of a new class of drugs being developed for the treatment of acute neurological injury such as ruptured aneurysm. These drugs arose from efforts to develop compounds to inhibit lipid peroxidation, a key mechanism to reduce vasospasm and provide neuronal protection.
 In the study reported today more than 1,000 patients underwent up to 10 days of therapy and follow-up through three months, at 41 neurosurgical centers. Patients were randomized in approximately equal size groups to receive either placebo, 0.6, 2.0 or 6 mg/kg/day doses of tirilazad mesylatc. In addition, all patients received concomitant therapy with intravenous nimodipine. The study was coordinated by the Neuroclinical Trials Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia and supported by The Upjohn Company (NYSE: UPJ).
 "We're encouraged by these results," Kassell said. "This is the first generation of a new class of compounds to reduce the damage from these debilitating events."
 There are an estimated 70,000 cases of ruptured intracranial aneurysms annually in the United States and Western Europe.
 -0- 10/20/93
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Kassell is available for interviews between 10 a.m. to midnight EDT today, Oct. 20 at 011-52-746-91000./
 /CONTACT: Bill Ballas of the University of Virginia, 804-924-2204/
 (UPJ)


CO: University of Virginia; The Upjohn Company ST: IN: MTC SU:

DC-KD -- DC007 -- 4364 10/20/93 08:12 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 20, 1993
Words:457
Previous Article:NEW ANALYSIS DEMONSTRATES THAT CHLORINE DIOXIDE IS THE ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARD FOR PAPERMAKING
Next Article:FAMCICLOVIR SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES PAIN FOR 'SHINGLES' SUFFERERS, NEW STUDY SHOWS
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters