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NEW INSTRUMENTATION TO LOCATE AND IDENTIFY BURIED EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE AND DETECT HAZARDOUS WASTE

 WASHINGTON, Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Scientists from the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the Navy Explosives Ordnance Disposal Technology Center have developed and demonstrated a prototype towed- away magnetic anomaly detection system to locate and identify unexploded ordnance at Department of Defense (DoD) target and bombing ranges and to detect and characterize buried materials at toxic/hazardous waste sites.
 According to Dr. Jimmie McDonald, NRL's principal investigator, the Surface Towed Ordnance Locator System (STOLS), which was developed in 1990 and tested at several DoD sites, has demonstrated detection confidence levels of between 90 and 95 percent for a wide range of ordnance items at up to 15-foot depths. McDonald reports that hand-held magnetometer surveys at the same sites, conducted by trained explosive ordnance disposal personnel, found less than 35 percent of the targets.
 More recently, the ability of STOLS to locate and characterize buried hazardous waste was successfully evaluated at a number of Department of Energy hazardous waste sites.
 McDonald reports that the survey system uses an array of seven cesium full-field magnetometers on a platform towed by a low magnetic signature all-terrain vehicle. An eighth, fixed-site reference magnetometer is used to measure background data and the diurnal changes in the earth's magnetic field. A compass and a microwave navigation system interact with the tow vehicle computer during a survey to guide the operator and provide target locations. A computer analysis system (located at the field command center) is used to process and interpolate the raw field data and produce magnetic anomaly images and target analyses and logs of the survey site.
 As a result of the success of the STOLS system, NRL has begun a more ambitious developmental program, which will address additional contaminants requiring new sensors, such as chemical and radioactivity sensors.
 -0- 2/17/93
 /CONTACT: Dick Baturin, public affairs branch, Naval Research Laboratory, 202-767-2541 or, fax, 202-767-6991/


CO: Naval Research Laboratory ST: District of Columbia IN: ARO SU:

KD -- DC002 -- 7467 02/17/93 15:44 EST
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Date:Feb 17, 1993
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