Printer Friendly

NEW HHS GUIDELINES ON PRESSURE ULCERS FOCUS ATTENTION ON PATIENT CARE AND COST MANAGEMENT

 NEW HHS GUIDELINES ON PRESSURE ULCERS FOCUS ATTENTION
 ON PATIENT CARE AND COST MANAGEMENT
 PRINCETON, N.J., May 18 /PRNewswire/ -- New guidelines on the prevention of pressure ulcers announced today by the federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research will help health care professionals and administrators effectively address a very painful and costly problem, according to Joseph Walker, vice president and general manager of ConvaTec, U.S., a division of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (NYSE: BMY). The company is the largest manufacturer of hydrocolloid dressings which are used to manage pressure ulcers.
 "Pressure ulcers are a major problem in the care of long-term patients," said Walker. "They can interfere, complicate, even take precedence over conditions that hospitalize patients. Ineffective management of pressure ulcers can, and often does lead to extended hospitalization for patients who would otherwise be discharged. Unfortunately, many health care professionals and administrators do not yet realize how costly pressure ulcers are to institutions."
 "HHS has recognized the impact pressure ulcers have on the quality and cost of acute and long-term care," Walker said. "These new guidelines make it imperative for health care professionals and administrators to team-up and look for more effective ways to prevent and manage pressure ulcers."
 1991 Study Cites Economic Impact
 Pressure ulcers cost the American hospital industry up to $6.4 billion each year, according to data cited in an economic impact analysis performed last year by a major consulting firm for ConvaTec. This projection may represent a conservative estimate since it excludes nursing home and home-based health care data, ConvaTec officials note. Some professional and industry experts believe that the cost of pressure ulcers could easily be in excess of $10 billion per year.
 The analysis cited prevalence estimates of pressure ulcers of up to 14 percent of any hospital's patient population. Another source cited in the analysis indicates that up to 25 percent of the patients in skilled nursing centers suffer from pressure sores at any given time. The study estimates that one pressure ulcer can cost an institution between $14,000 and $25,000.
 Cost Effective Treatment Options
 A recent clinical study conducted at the University of Chicago Medical Center examined the relative cost effectiveness of two treatments for pressure ulcers: hydrocolloid dressings and moist saline gauze dressings. Hydrocolloid dressings are advanced, high technology bandages which create a moist healing environment that encourages healing. Hydrocolloids are replacing traditional saline- treated gauze bandages in the treatment of pressure ulcers.
 The University of Chicago study found that hydrocolloids, specifically ConvaTec's DuoDERM CGF, were much more cost effective than the traditional gauze treatment because it dramatically reduced nursing time spent on numerous dressing changes. Gauze dressings need to be reapplied several times a day. Hydrocolloid dressings usually are changed once every three days, which enables the healing process to progress more efficiently and without frequent interruption, which can delay healing.
 Over the course of treatment, DuoDERM CGF was three times less expensive to use than saline-soaked gauze dressings. That would translate into a savings of more than $500,000 per year for a 500-bed hospital, according to the independent consulting firm.
 Clinical Effectiveness
 Since 1982, numerous studies have been conducted to compare the safety and effectiveness of hydrocolloid dressings in the treatment of pressure ulcers, according to Walker. "The overwhelming body of clinical evidence indicates that hydrocolloid dressings are more effective than gauze dressings, even among patients with severe nutritional problems. There also is documentation that hydrocolloids can help reduce the risk of infection during treatment."
 "Approximately 1.8 million patients suffer from pressure ulcers each year," said Walker. "The cost of their suffering is something that can and should be addressed. We are pleased the federal government has moved pressure sores to the center of the cost- effectiveness debate."
 ConvaTec markets a full range of DuoDERM CGF products worldwide for the management of pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, burns, donor sites and abrasions.
 Bristol-Myers Squibb is a research-based, diversified health care company with principle businesses in pharmaceuticals, consumer products, nutritionals, and medical devices.
 -0- 5/18/92
 /NOTE: DuoDERM and CGF are registered trademarks./
 /CONTACT: Sally Benjamin Young or Mike Grossman of Porter/Novelli, 312-856-8888, for ConvaTec, U.S./
 (BMY) CO: ConvaTec, U.S.; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company; Agency for Health
 Care Policy and Research ST: New Jersey IN: HEA SU:


DC -- DC023 -- 1385 05/18/92 13:46 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 18, 1992
Words:727
Previous Article:CHICAGO TRIBUNE NAMES JIM JACKSON AND MACHELLE JOSEPH BIG TEN MVPS
Next Article:BELL CANADA ANNOUNCES U.S. DEBENTURE ISSUE AND REDEMPTION OF 8-3/4 PERCENT DEBENTURES, SERIES DA, DUE 2006
Topics:


Related Articles
Saving residents, money - and facilities - with improved skin care.
High acuity can mean high risk of pressure ulcers.
Coping with the Pressure of Wound Care.
American Heart Association Healthcare Quality Improvement Program Recognized By U.S. Health and Human Services.
Removing bottlenecks: how the HIPAA privacy rule may impact care coordination and healthcare quality--and steps HHS can take to protect them. (HIPAA...
Implementing the new CMS guidelines for wound care: areas for potential citations are explained by Jeffrey M. Levine, MD, AGSF, CMD; Marilyn...
Technological Improvement Stimulates the U.S. Specialty Bed and Support Surface Market.
Medicare and Medicaid Service announced that as of: October 2008, it will no longer reimburse hospitals for treating preventable pressure ulcers.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters