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NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION ADOPTS NEW INITIATIVE ON SEEKING COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER JOBS

 WASHINGTON, Feb. 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Chairman Frank W. Garred of the National Newspaper Association today announced that the association has adopted a new initiative designed to encourage journalism school graduates and other interested professionals to seek jobs on community newspapers.
 "Everyone thinks that the way to learn your way around a newspaper is to start with a big metro daily or a wire service," said Garred, "but the way you really learn it is the way most of our publishers did -- by starting on a small community newspaper where you soon learn how to do every job on the paper. Not only is it the best way to learn, it's fun while you're learning. I know. That's how I learned.
 "Today's graduates don't want to be tutored, they're creative, innovative people, anxious for responsibility, and believe me, that's the kind of people we're all looking to hire," he said.
 Garred, who is publisher of the Port Townsend Jefferson County Leader in Port Townsend, Wash., said that the association's board of directors agreed that community newspapers are "the logical entry point for anyone who wants to learn the newspaper business."
 Tonda F. Rush, president and CEO of the association, said that, effective immediately, a special "Situations Wanted" classified section in the National Newspaper Association's biweekly newspaper, Publishers' Auxiliary, will be set up for students to seek summer jobs or entry-level positions.
 "These are the jobs -- including reporter or photographer or ad salesperson -- that lead to management jobs such as editor, advertising manager, circulation manager, or even publisher," she said. "We're not limited to journalism graduates. Business school graduates and talented liberal arts graduates are also successful in this environment.
 "What's really great about starting this way," she said, "is that you're a part of the business itself from day one -- whether the paper makes money or loses money, wins prizes or loses readers, will depend directly on the quality of your contribution."
 That, said Garred, is why publishers are so eager to get these entry-level graduates "when they are most interested in mastering a broad range of skills." He said the association plans a continuing outreach program to colleges and journalism schools, to acquaint the students with the job potential represented by the more than 4,600 community newspapers that belong to the association.
 -0- 2/24/93
 /CONTACT: Mark Sheehan, public affairs director, National Newspaper Association, 202-466-7200/


CO: National Newspaper Association ST: District of Columbia IN: PUB SU:

IH -- DC001 -- 9754 02/24/93 08:58 EST
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Date:Feb 24, 1993
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