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NATION'S FIRST LOOK AT DYNAMICS OF "ONE NUMBER, ONE PHONE" REVEALS HOW AMERICA REALLY FEELS ABOUT PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES

 BELL ATLANTIC MOBILE, CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY TODAY UNVEIL
 FINDINGS OF GROUND-BREAKING "INSTANT ACCESSIBILITY" STUDY
 PITTSBURGH, Pa., Nov. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Bell Atlantic Mobile (BAM) today unveiled initial findings of a ground-breaking study designed to gauge how Americans really feel about "round-the-clock" personal communications.
 In conjunction with Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) research, BAM reports that the initial findings of its nine-month Personal Line trial demonstrate that personal and business life can and will remain separate -- by user choice. The findings have far-reaching implications for all companies now involved in developing Personal Communications Services (PCS) throughout the United States.
 BAM and CMU announced their findings on the heels of the Federal Communications Commission's much-anticipated decision to broaden the PCS landscape by defining who can bid on new radio spectrum allocation.
 Just how "in touch" do Americans want to be?
 According to BAM findings, consumers and businesses want "24-hour reachability" for three key reasons:
 PERSONAL
 -- Peace-of-Mind. (The ability to reach friends and family
 members at a moment's notice.)
 -- Flexibility. (The ability to communicate across home,
 mobile, and office environments using just one phone
 number.)
 -- Accessibility. (The ability to control exactly how much
 access users want and need.)
 BUSINESS
 -- Increased Productivity. (The ability to turn "down-time"
 into "useful time.")
 -- Customer Service. (The ability to handle consumer requests
 instantly.)
 -- Flexibility. (The ability to "never be out of touch.")
 MANY FIRSTS
 CMU's studies are the first to explore the human impact of "person- focused rather than location-focused" communications -- essentially, the ability to reach and be reached anytime, anywhere.
 BAM's Personal Line trial is the nation's first to use an existing cellular
network to provide Personal Communications Services. The trial was so successful during its initial nine-month run that BAM sought and received FCC approval for a 12-month extension, with an eye towards commercial rollout of Personal Line in regions throughout the country.
 According to Dennis F. Strigl, president and chief executive officer of Bell Atlantic Mobile, "PCS services hold forth the promise that Americans will have the power to design exactly how, when, and where they want to communicate -- both for personal and business reasons. Today, as we look at these important findings, we have learned that Americans want mobility and accessibility -- but perhaps even more importantly, they want the ability to design and define their own unique phone features.
 "We are thrilled with the Personal Line findings," said Strigl. "Now, more than ever, we know that the much heralded `new era of personal communications' is truly in the hands of the customer -- because it is the end user who will determine just what a `Personal Communicator' will be," said Strigl.
 PERSONAL LINE TRIAL SUBJECTS AND CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY
 Bell Atlantic Mobile launched its Personal Line trial during January 1993 to study both the marketing and technical aspects of "one number, one phone" personal communications services. For instance, BAM studied the types of users most likely to benefit from Personal Line, how personal communications services would work on existing cellular networks, and what prices the market would bear for this type of service.
 Sara Kiesler, a professor of social sciences and social psychology at CMU, oversaw studies into issues such as work group communication, personal privacy concerns and spectrum allocation.
 Some 500 trial participants came from a variety of backgrounds, ranging from "Yellow Pages Entrepreneurs," who would lose business if they missed a call, to trades and craftsmen, sales, health care and corporate executives. About 100 of the participants were graduate students, faculty and staff members from CMU.
 PERSONAL LINE TRIAL IMPACT
 "The Personal Line trial is helping to identify personal communications features that are of greatest importance to users," said Jerry Fountain, Bell Atlantic Mobile regional vice president in Pittsburgh.
 "From a technical perspective, we learned that one of the biggest attributes of Personal Line is that the system does all the work. Autonomous registration is the key," Fountain said.
 Personal Line users simply turn on pocket-sized phones, and Bell of Pennsylvania's Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) automatically routes calls via the lowest-cost option, either by:
 -- landlines (through a special base station designed by
 Motorola);
 -- low-powered microcells (installed for the trial in such
 Pittsburgh locations as Three Rivers Stadium and PPG Place;
 -- macrocells (the "regular" cellular network).
 SELECTIVE CALL ACCESS
 In addition to ease of use, CMU found that another important feature was the ability to "selectively control communication access -- that is, the ability to block out or accept only certain calls.
 Those calls might be related to times when:
 -- Users want to have a quiet, uninterrupted dinner with a
 spouse, child or client;
 -- Users want a family, child or client to "get through, no
 matter what;" for instance, for news on the birth of a
 child, or for last-minute data that might be useful for a
 client presentation.
 "Blocking and screening features were not used as extensively as has been anticipated, because more time may have been needed for participants to become comfortable with the features," said Fountain.
 "Participants also said they would have given out their Personal Line number more freely had they been certain that number would not change at the end of nine months," he further explained.
 Bell Atlantic Mobile's cellular operations constitute the largest carrier on the East Coast and one of the largest carriers in North America, serving a total population of 35 million. Bell Atlantic Mobile provides cellular service and equipment in Washington, D.C., and 15 states in New England, the mid-Atlantic, the Carolinas, and the Southwest. Headquartered in Bedminster, N.J., the cellular communications divisions are subsidiaries of Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic Corporation.
 For information related to Carnegie Mellon University's study, please contact Lisa Lightner at 412-268-3580.
 -0- 11/16/93
 /CONTACT: Steve Fleischer, 908-306-7539, or Pat Quolke, 412-563-0367, both of BAM; or Mary McPartland of Hill and Knowlton, Inc., 212-697-5600/


CO: Bell Atlantic Mobile; Carnegie Mellon University ST: Pennsylvania IN: TLS SU:

SH-JG -- NY024 -- 5046 11/16/93 11:44 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 16, 1993
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