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NASA REPORT HIGHLIGHTS NEED FOR PROMPT COMMERCIALIZATION OF CFC ALTERNATIVES; INDUSTRY ALLIANCE SAYS SOLUTIONS ARE AVAILABLE

NASA   REPORT   HIGHLIGHTS   NEED   FOR  PROMPT  COMMERCIALIZATION  OF  CFC
    ALTERNATIVES; INDUSTRY ALLIANCE SAYS SOLUTIONS ARE AVAILABLE
    WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- The Alliance for Responsible CFC Policy announced today that industry has succeeded in reducing emissions of ozone depleting compounds by 50 percent worldwide, well ahead of schedule according to the Clean Air Act and the governing international treaty, and is poised for the elimination of the remaining compounds by the end of 1995.  The announcement is welcomed in light of the report yesterday from NASA that the ozone hole over Antarctica is the largest ever measured.  "This NASA report further highlights the need for continued cooperation by industry and government to achieve the rapid commercialization of alternatives to ozone depleting compounds," said Alliance Chairman James Wolf.
    The Alliance is hosting a conference of 1,700 experts on ozone protecting alternatives this week in Washington.  The conference participants include industry and policy experts from more than 30 countries around the world.
    Industry leaders termed the NASA news as "disturbing, but not unexpected."  "The scientific community has anticipated additional reports of ozone depletion through the next few years because of the lag between emissions of these compounds and the time it takes to reach the stratosphere," said Wolf.  "Additionally, the current meteorological conditions, including volcanic activity and colder than normal temperatures in the southern hemisphere, only serve to aggravate the atmosphere chemistry.  Because of the prompt industry action, the recovery period of the Antarctic ozone hole has been reduced by more than 30 years."
    The technologies being discussed this week, once fully commercialized, will allow the elimination of CFCs and other ozone depleting compounds at a pace not previously believed possible," said Wolf.  "President Bush recognized the tremendous progress made by the CFC using and producing industries when he called earlier this year for an acceleration of the phase-out of ozone depleting compounds. Industry announced at that time that it would support the president's action.  We are here this week to highlight the fact that we are ready, willing and able."
    The world community is expected to formally adopt the president's proposal for an accelerated phaseout scheduled at a meeting of the parties to the Montreal Protocol, scheduled for Nov. 23-25 in Copenhagen, Denmark.
    In keynote remarks yesterday, Jack Krol, vice chairman of the Dupont Company, Krol hailed the rapid introduction of ozone protecting technologies as "one of the most remarkable technological developments in the post-World War II era."  Krol also urged the industry leaders not to rest on their laurels, but to move as rapidly as possible to adopt these technologies, both for new and existing products.
    At lunch, Michael Deland, chairman of the President's Council on Environmental Quality, welcomed the delegates on behalf of President Bush, commended them for their successful initiatives to date and urged the formation of a more formal cooperative relationship among government, industry and environmental groups on these significant environmental issues.  Deland commended the precedent for cooperation established on the ozone depletion issue as a means of rapidly responding to environmental challenges in an economically sensible manner.
    The 1992 International CFC and Halon Alternatives Conference is being held at the Washington Hilton Hotel, 1919 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Washington.  It is co-sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Canada, and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).  The conference runs through Thursday, Oct. 1.  It includes more than 90 exhibits of ozone protecting technologies.
    The Alliance for Responsible CFC Policy is a coalition of companies and trade associations whose products and services rely on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).  It was organized in 1980 to coordinate industry participation in development of reasonable international and U.S. government policies on the regulation of CFCs and their alternatives and protection of the ozone layer.
    -0-             09/30/92
    CONTACT:  Joe Shafran for the Alliance for Responsible CFC Policy, 202-544-1610 CO:  ALLIANCE FOR RESPONSIBLE CFC POLICY IN:  CHM ST:  DC -- DC020 -- X486  09/30/92
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Date:Sep 30, 1992
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