Printer Friendly

My son has had reactions to bee stings in the past. I am worried that he may have a more severe reaction sometime when I am not around, such as at school. What can be done if this occurs?

Dear Dr. Cory:

My son has had reactions to bee stings in the past. I am worried that he may have a more severe reaction sometime when I am not around, such as at school. What can be done if this occurs?

Marissa Weiberger

Trenton, New Jersey

Dear Ms. Weiberger:

Discuss your son's reactions with his doctor. Depending on the type of reaction, the doctor may prescribe an emergency kit for your son. This kit may contain anti-histamine medication, injectable epinephrine, or both. If your son's reaction has involved more than swelling at the site of the bee sting, then the doctor may refer your son to an allergist for allergy shots to desensitize him to insect venom.

Anaphylaxis is rare. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAI), it occurs in only one to two percent of the general population for insect stings and food allergies. The AAAI reports, however, that it occurs more often than is generally believed. And when it does occur, it progresses rapidly.

People commonly believe that a person will first have a mild reaction to bee stings, food, etc., as a sort of warning before a severe reaction. This is not always the case, however. Anaphylactic shock can begin minutes after a person comes in contact with the allergen. A delay in treatment can be disastrous.

Therefore, the AAAI recommends that it would be in the best interest of students and staff if schools kept epinephrine on hand. A nurse or other school personnel trained in the proper recognition and management of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, then would have the proper medication available to administer in an emergency. The AAAI, in their position statement for "The Use of Epinephrine in the Treatment of Anaphylaxis," also recommends that "school nurses and other supervisory personnel should receive periodic in-service training concerning anaphylaxis, the proper use of epinephrine, the importance of emergency procedures and physician notification after the injection, and proper record keeping."

Sincerely,

Cory SerVaas, M.D.
COPYRIGHT 1996 Benjamin Franklin Literary & Medical Society, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1996 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 
Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Ask Dr. Cory
Author:SerVaas, Cory
Publication:Humpty Dumpty's Magazine
Date:Sep 1, 1996
Words:334
Previous Article:My six year old will be attending public school this year. She is very excited about buying her lunch at school. I have heard that school lunches are...
Next Article:School bus safety.
Topics:


Related Articles
Can you tell me more about the so-called "killer bees"?
Getting the bite out of a bee sting.
What is the correct way to remove a stinger from a bee sting?
What are chiggers and what is the best way to treat chigger bites?
I heard that if you pour vinegar on a jellyfish that the vinegar will kill its stinger. Is that true?
Ask Doctor Cory.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters