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Mum sells dresses for lesbian caresses; Dear Eve; Should I tell my friend about sex shocker?

Dear Eve

My mother owns and runs an exclusive fashion and design salon and she has a good clientele. I am in my final year of a course in design so I can follow her wishes and help run the business.

Mother has records on every client she has ever had, including a number which she filed under ""Personal". I asked about these - they spent a lot of money with her - but she was evasive.

In the end she admitted that these ladies called on her for fittings and sex. She said that when she first began the shop after father's death, one of her first clients was a girl with whom she had an affair while at boarding school. Mother provided the ball gown and the sex and others became clients by recommendation.

Mother simply said she loves dress design and she loves sex and this way she gets the best of both worlds. She said what she does is not illegal, nor does she solicit.

But my problem is that I find that the mother of my best friend at university is one of mother's enthusiastic clients. I just do not know how to handle the knowledge.

I Can understand that you were very shocked when you found out that not only was your mother making dresses for her clients, she was also making love to them.

Now you say you don't know what to do with the knowledge that your best friend's mother has a great enthusiasm for lesbian sex with your mother.

Ask yourself will anyone be helped if you share this information? Will any harm come to anyone if you keep this to yourself?

I think not. In fact, I imagine you wish your mother hadn't been so frank with you. If you really are a friend you will stay silent.

DEAR EVE

I Am in the midst of the most fantastic affair but I don't know what to do - I can't bear to let my husband touch me but I'd die if he found out. I have three children I love dearly and I know he would take them away from me.

I met my lover four months ago and see him once a week. Those hours, spent in his house when his girlfriend is out, are the best I have ever had in my life. We talk about being together forever but I know it can't happen.

I try to be normal around the house but I can't help remembering his touch, the things he says to me, the way I caress him and the way I am so bold with him and his delight in it. I can't get this out of my mind. In fact, I don't want to. What should I do?

Pull yourself together. It won't be the three hours a week that will lose you everything. It's for the mooning lust-filled hours that you spend thinking about them that you will be caught. So when you have left your lover you have to put yourself back on track. In your private moments you may enjoy thinking about him but these must be when no-one can tell that your mind has wandered off. If you don't, not only will your husband guess something is wrong, but your children will feel neglected - or even worse they or you might have an accident.

Your lover, too, sounds tied up. Take a tip from me, men compartmentalise their lives. If you are going to continue this relationship from now on, so should you.

DEAR EVE

The death of Princess Diana has made me think about my mother's death two years ago. I cannot get it out of my head and I keep crying and feeling awful. What can I do?

I Think the shock of the sudden death of the princess woke up memories that many of us had hidden from ourselves.

Any new bereavement is likely to remind us of earlier ones. Sometimes these feelings have been buried for years because nowadays we are so bad at dealing with death. Unlike the Victorians, who would publicly mourn for months, now there are no rules and little in the way of ritual.

Unless you are religious, the most frequent suggestion for dealing with the pain and sadness is getting back to work and normality. In a way it is, but keeping our minds off things by being busy doesn't make them go away. The sad emotions just get pushed back further into the backwater of our brains.

But they are still there nevertheless. Eventually they may evaporate, but a sudden shock can bring them rushing into the forefront of our thoughts. It sounds like this has happened to you.

Don't bottle them up. You loved and still miss your mother. There is nothing to be ashamed of. Be honest with yourself and don't try to banish your tears. The crying and the misery will pass but use this as a lesson. Your feelings are every bit as important as anyone else's. Only you can own up to them and deal with them, happy or sad, in your own unique way.

DEAR EVE

I Am single and attractive - at least my friends say I am. But I can't seem to pull a fella. Yes, they come over to me at discos but something I do puts them off. My friends say I'm too serious and I should be more jokey but that isn't me. What should I do?

Maybe being serious does put some blokes off. Not that they're the ones for you. But it would be good to ease up a little. No-one wants to be lectured or to feel they aren't clever when you meet. Learn one or two lines from your mates or the telly. Or go to places where the sort of men you will meet might be a little older or a little more like you. You may also like to listen to my tape How Women Find Love 0891 252839.

IN BED WITH EVE

Have a last fling with the natural look just before autumn really settles in. Get your man in the mood by going to your next party with some of your clothes off. A dress with a tight bodice means that an uplifting bra isn't necessary. The last lot of your fake tan can be all the leg covering you need. And a barely-there tanga leaves virtually no panty line.

My worry over sexy husband

Dear Eve

My husband will be working in another town three nights a week for the next month or two until we buy a house nearby. He is a highly sexed man. We make love every night and I wonder what he will do without me. He is very good looking and always charms the ladies. What can I do?

Keep him hot for you with sexy letters and phone calls. Whispered words and emotions will turn him on to you.

Get into the habit of speaking to him last thing at night and imagine that instead of being separated by miles you are in bed together. Tell him what you are wearing, what you'd like to be doing and how the sound of his voice still turns you on. 'The absences might even make your marriage better.

YOU DECIDE

Here's a problem for YOU to solve. Read it...and then call the relevant vote line (below) to give YOUR verdict. We'll reveal how you voted next week.

I'm sure child is not my brother's

My sister-in-law and brother have three children. The first two are very alike, both dark like their parents. The last, a surprise addition, is absolutely the opposite, a pale-skinned blonde boy. On our side we are all brown or black-haired and my sister-in-law always says this third child looks like her father, a man who we've never met - until now.

Apparently he left my sister-in-law's mother years ago and none of the children have seen him for years. But by accident I met him at a friend's funeral. He is darker haired than the rest of us, apart from a touch of grey.

I have always suspected this child is not my brother's. Now that I've met his supposed look-alike grandfather, who incidentally says he wants to return to the family fold, I am even more suspicious.

WHAT WOULD

YOU ADVISE?

TELL HIM

Should I tell my brother that by accident I have met his father- in-law and not only does he want to return to his family but he looks nothing like this third child?

WARN HER

Or should I warn my sister-in-law so she makes sure her father doesn't come back into their life? My brother would be heart-broken if he even suspected that his wife had been unfaithful.

LAST WEEK

Three-Quarters of you in last week's poll advised our teenage girl reader to confront her mother over banishing her boyfriend from their home after finding they had spent the night there together.
COPYRIGHT 1997 MGN LTD
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Copyright 1997 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 
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Title Annotation:Features
Author:Pollard, Eve
Publication:Sunday Mirror (London, England)
Date:Sep 28, 1997
Words:1501
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