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Multigenerational effcts of polychlorinated biphenyls on the reproduction, estrous cycles and organ weights of Sprague-Dawley rats. (Medicine 09:00 AM, Saturday, April 5, 2003 Brewer/Frost Science 141 Dr. Nancy J. Swails-Presiding).

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Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are synthetic chemicals with hundreds of industrial applications because of their stability. Because of bioaccumulation, they have been found to cause many health problems in animals. In this study, we examined multigenerational effects of PCB on Sprague-Dawley rats fed a diet containing one of three types of PCB (PCB 77, PCB 47, or AROCLOR 1254) in one of two concentrations (1.25ppm or 12.5ppm), mated to the F2 generation. The FDA allows foodstuffs to contain no more than 3ppm. Therefore the concentrations used reflect an accepted amount and an elevated amount. Estrous cycles were monitored in female rats. Animals were euthanized and liver, thyroid gland, testes, uterus and ovaries were removed and weighed. Blood serum was collected for thyroid hormone assay. Data were analyzed using a one way ANOVA. PCB significantly extended the length of estrous cycles (P=<0.0001) and delayed mating in cohabitating pairs of rats. Exposure to PCB variably influenced organ weights compared to those of unexposed rats. With few exceptions, although not significant, treatment groups experienced an increase in ovarian weights. High and low doses of each PCB type caused a general increase in the uterine weight in F2 females. A general, but not significant decrease in testis weight was observed in most treatment groups. A significant increase in thyroid weight was seen in female rats for high and low doses of all congeners studied, with a similar trend of a general increase in thyroid weight, PCB exposed males. Overall, a trend toward depression in liver weight occurred in F2 females, while the liver weights of males were variable. Thyroid hormone levels were altered in treatment animals. These results suggest that PCB effects over two generations differ from those in the first generation.

CHRISTINA M. CARRUTHERS SMILNAK@BGNET.BGSU.EDU, LEE A. MESERVE LMESERV@BGNET.BGSU.EDU, DEPT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY, BOWLING GREEN OH 43403-0212
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Author:Carruthers, Christina M.; Meserve, Lee A.
Publication:The Ohio Journal of Science
Article Type:Abstract
Geographic Code:1U3OH
Date:Mar 1, 2003
Words:319
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