Printer Friendly

Mississippi drops legal blood-alcohol level to 0.08 percent. (Policy and Legislation).

Mississippi law enforcement officers can expect to make more drunken driving arrests and to respond to fewer alcohol-related crashes as a result of a new State law lowering the legal blood-alcohol limit from 0.10 percent to 0.08 percent.

Mississippi Gov. Ronnie Musgrove signed the 0.08 blood alcohol content legislation into law on March 18, 2002, making Mississippi the 31st State to lower the driving-under-the-influence offense from 0.10 blood alcohol content to 0.08. The law goes into effect July 1, 2002, nearly two years after former President Clinton signed a bill setting the national standard for driving under the influence at 0.08 and linking State compliance with Federal highway funding.
COPYRIGHT 2002 Superintendent of Documents
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Public Roads
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:May 1, 2002
Words:115
Previous Article:Benefitting from LTPP--a state's perspective: Pennsylvania catalogs the successes of the Long Term Pavement Performance Program in helping to improve...
Next Article:Now available: a benefit-cost analysis for using ITS technology for traffic management in temporary construction zones. (Management and...
Topics:


Related Articles
California committee approves lower blood alcohol level.
N.H. governor-elect pushes lower B.A.C..
NABR opposes law for 0.08% B.A.C..
Will lower BAC limits make a difference?
Tennessee baffle on .08 BAC content set to begin in earnest.
Lower BAC becomes law in Missouri.
Louisiana legislature passes .08 BAC.
LOWERING THE LIMIT, STATE BY STATE.
Some states resisting drive for .08 BAC.
National drunk driving standard set at .08.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters