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Missiometrics 2006: goals, resources, doctrines of the 350 Christian World Communions.

This 4-page report is the twenty-second in an annual series since 1985. It enumerates the major global goals in world mission, with its human resources, and its core doctrines. These are all as promulgated by today's 350 Christian World Communions. These CWCs are distinct and separate organized ecclesiastical bodies each uniting churches and denominations of one single ecclesiastical-cultural tradition. This report hinges on 4 global statistical tables A,B,C and Z, describing the impact of these CWCs.

Global Table A. 50 Shared Goals

The subtitle of this first Table (see next page) is 'Status of global mission, AD 1900-AD 2025'. It sets out the evolution of 78 factors in global mission over the period 1900 to 2025. (Note also the near-final column, Trends % per year). Of these 78 statistical factors, some 50 can be seen as overall challenges and goals that are shared as such by all 350 CWCs. These range from tackling the negative effects reported in Lines 6,9,10,31,59,76, to supporting the positive effects in Lines 27,47,55,66,78. A surprising discovery has been that, as indicated in Line 29, virtually all CWCs today are openly proclaiming obedience to Christ's Great Commission as narrated 6 times in the Four Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles.

Global Table B. 50 Shared Resources

The subtitle of this second table is 'The world's 350 Christian World Communions (CWCs), with each's own members in AD 2006'. It lists by name all 350 CWCs at work today. These are listed under 10 categories descriptive but nonjudgmental, moving from 1 = maximum involvement, to 10 = minimal or zero involvement. All CWCs utilize a parallel list of 50 global resources. First is their own committed memberships, listed here after each CWC's name. Each's share of the world's 695 million Great Commission Christians can be approximately calculated by multiplying each's membership by 34%--another startling discovery indeed. Next is each's parallel share of the rapidly increasing annual global giving to Christian causes--from US$270 billion in AD 2000 to $360 billion by AD 2006 (see Table A's Lines 55 to 57). The other 48 major resources, all listed here in Table A, cover human resources (5.4 million full-time church workers, 38,000 denominations), 460 million computers, literature, periodicals, radio/TV broadcasting, audiovisual ministries, scripture distribution, evangelism strategies. Each CWC's share of these massive resources is roughly in proportion to its number of members as listed here. These resources are however not entirely controlled within their CWCs; in practice men, money and machines work across boundaries wherever they wish. Overall, nevertheless, today's resources for global mission are entirely adequate in virtually every detail.

Global Table C. 50 Shared Doctrines

The subtitle of this third Table is '50 core beliefs or essential elements held by 350 Christian World Communions.' Yet another surprising discovery has sprung from a detailed analysis of each CWC's reports, news releases, literature, histories, statistics, and other documentation. This shows that virtually all CWCs today promulgate not only shared goals and shared resources: they also share the major doctrines and beliefs of Christianity in its global mission. In fact, they are found to share 10 basic or major theological or missiological keywords--God, Christ, Mission, Disciples, Church, Outreach (i.e. living for others), Beneficiaries (the poor, the marginalized), Strategies (world evangelization plans), Tribulation (suffering, persecution, martyrdom), Futures (Parousia, Advent, Christ's Return). These 10 keywords are shown in the lefthand column in this Table C. They are then further divided into 50 essential elements or lesser doctrines or beliefs openly acknowledged by all.

Global Table Z. 50 Unshared Operations

This final Table is meant to be read after the reader has digested Global Tables A,B, and C. It deals with the question: Where do the CWCs' enormous energies actually go? The short answer is: they go mainly on internal standalone administrative operations. Each CWC controls the following unshared in detail by the other 349 CWCs:

* own administration

* own agendas

* own archives

* own budget

* own computers

* own constitution

* own currency policies

* own decision-making

* own discipline

* own documentation

* own emphases

* own field structure

* own finances

* own funding churches

* own funds

* own fund-raising

* own headquarters

* own hierarchy

* own history

* own identity

* own information base

* own initials/acronym

* own jargon

* own language use

* own legal documents

* own legal identity

* own library

* own literature

* own local goals

* own magazines

* own methods

* own missionaries

* own names and titles

* own office staff

* own online networ

* own personnel

* own plant

* own premises

* own priorities

* own processes

* own programs

* own propaganda

* own publications

* own publicity

* own recruiting

* own terminology

* own salary scales

* own standards

* own training

* own websites

Every CWC thus operates its own 50 or so major internal operations, privately and under its own control, and in most cases without consulting or deferring to or even referring to the other 349 CWCs. This syndrome may be termed 'the monolithic standalone mode'. It results in several problematic attitudes. (1) Most leaders consider their own CWC to be probably the best and most enlightened of all 350. (2) This superiority justifies a world-embracing title (50 CWCs title themselves 'Universal', or 'Global', or 'World', or 'International'). (3) This assumed primacy allows a new CWC executive to boldly announce new plans while ignoring such colossal megaproblems as how to reach the world's 4.3 billion non-Christians, or the 1,680 million urban poor (as with Global Table A's Lines 9,10,23). And (4) this justifies the situation in which in all CWCs the vast expenditure of energy, time, money, and human resources goes to maintain each's 50 unshared internal operations. This final Table Z above highlights this dilemma.

Some Proposals

What actually divide CWCs from each other, and prevent concerted collaboration, are significant subjects but of much less importance than those global goals, global resources, and global doctrines described in Global Tables A,B, and C. What divides CWCs are: language, culture, geopolitics, ethnicity, dress, historical controversies, and a host of similar problems. One solution for CWCs to think over would be to force their own goals/resources/doctrines to come to the fore with all their enormous significance. A second proposal would be to confront the de facto situation represented by the 50 unshared operations usurping the bulk of CWC energy. And a third would be for all CWCs to deliberately get to know a dozen other CWCs and even to collaborate with them on specific projects.

Global Table C. 50 Shared Doctrines: 50 core beliefs or essential elements held by 350 Christian World Communions

The world in AD 2000 has followers promoting over 9,900 different religions, and a billion nonreligionists trying to end all religion. It therefore becomes essential to clarify precisely the exact meaning or definition of the terms 'Christian' and 'Christianity'. In the early church and later this was done by ecumenical councils (such as 1962's Vatican II, shown at left) through condensed statements--the Apostles' Creed, Nicene Creed, and numerous subsequent creeds, articles, confessions, and many modern catechisms.

Below are listed 50 distinct items, topics, or elements covering the whole range of subjects widely agreed to be essential to any thorough depicting of Christianity. For convenience, the 50 elements are listed in approximately chronological order of their emergence in the world's understanding. The list may be regarded as a provisional updated creed or catechism for the 21st century.

The diagram attempts to define mainstream Christianity and all related statistical categories enumerated in the present analysis.

Chronological sequence of the 50 essential elements

GOD

1. God the All-Powerful Creator of heaven and earth.

2. God the Sustainer continuously involved in all ongoing creation.

3. God the Father of all peoples, loving every individual.

4. Evil, sin, and the Fall of Man destroying close relationship with God.

5. The Old Testament as salvation history (Heilsgeschichte).

6. God's revelation, and science's worldview, as non-overlapping magisteria.

CHRIST

7. The incarnation of God the Son, the Messiah, born of the Virgin Mary.

8. The historicity of Jesus of Nazareth, his ministry, healings, and miracles.

9. Jesus' Crucifixion, death, burial, as recorded in the Four Gospels.

10. Jesus' Resurrection as witnessed by Apostles, disciples, the whole church.

11. The deity, as well as full humanity, of Jesus Christ as unique Son of God.

MISSION

12. Christ's Great Commission: 'Receive! Go! Witness! Proclaim! Disciple! Baptize! Train!'

13. Christ's Ascension into heaven and his Session at the Father's right hand.

14. God the Holy Spirit revealed at Pentecost as the empowering Evangelizer.

15. The 6-fold Gospel (Good News, Evangel) as kerygma preached by the Apostles.

16. The Mission of God (Missie Dei) to the whole world, and human involvement in it.

17. The Bible (Old & New Testaments) as the unique inspired spoken and written Word of God.

18. The Atonement through the Cross, overcoming death, evil, and all human sin.

19. God's grace and forgiveness of sins by faith, for all those who repent and believe.

20. The Holy Trinity: the mystery of Three Persons in One God.

DISCIPLES

21. Discipleship as personal experience of Christ with commitment to him as Savior and Lord.

22. The pentecostal/charismatic experience of gifts of the Holy Spirit.

23. Holiness of life: morality, ethics, behavior, sanctification, discipline, devotion, love, prayer, intercession.

24. Stewardship of time, money, resources, nature, species, environment.

25. The significant role of committed human leadership in church and mission, by women as well as men.

CHURCH

26. The Church as God's instrument throughout history; a community existing not for itself but to serve the world.

27. Regular public worship of God with ministries/sacraments/eucharists/liturgies/hymnodies/choirs/music old and new.

28. Summaries: Ten Commandments, Apostles' Creed, Nicene Creed, Athanasian Creed, modern catechisms.

29. Continual renewal and continuous reformation of Christianity, church, and agencies at every level via spiritual gifts.

OUTREACH

30. Collective and personal human witness to Christ as Risen Lord, the Light of the World.

31. Evangelism as proclamation of the Good News of salvation in Christ via all media ancient or modern.

32. Foreign mission as the Church's organized outreach, at the global level, to the non-Christian world.

33. The aim of evangelism: conversion of non-Christians, then catechumenate, baptism, discipleship, church membership.

34. Public confession or profession of faith in Christ and Christianity by individuals, churches, denominations.

BENEFICIARIES

35. Solidarity with the world's human need: the poor, the unprivileged, the exploited, the sick, the disabled, the blind.

36. Social justice, peace, nonviolence, and development for all as the church's daily concern.

37. The struggle for universal declaration of human rights, and their implementation.

38. Ministry among and to the world's 3,800 unevangelized ethnolinguistic peoples (known as World A).

39. Contact and dialogue with all the world's 6,500 non-Christian religions.

STRATEGIES

40. Mission as organized plans, strategies, and goals linked to and obeying the Great Commission.

41. Monitoring of the church's 2,056 instruments measuring and enumerating global mission.

42. Accountability in all contemporary spheres of the church's activities via publishing its detailed statistics.

43. God's plan for world mission and global evangelization, and human commitment to both.

44. Scripture distribution controlled by clearly-stated numerical goals and global spreading of resources.

TRIBULATION

45. Religious persecution and suffering as a direct and indispensible completing or fulfilling of Christ's sufferings.

46. Martyrdom's unsought daily toll seen as playing an essential role in 20 centuries of world mission and evangelization.

FUTURES

47. The church's future trends, future scenarios, and futuristics reflecting God's purposes for humanity.

48. The Advent, Eschaton, Millennium, Parousia, or Second Coming of the Returning Christ as King and Judge.

49. The Last Judgment: final accountability for all human activity on Earth.

50. God creates the New Heavens and New Earth and the future life.

Key to circles, names, letters, numbers above

(A) Arrowhead points to any outer boundary line

(B) Blob refers only to its surrounding space

25 Numbers state which of the 50 elements best describe major emphases or differentia

ORAPIm = The 6 ecclesiastico-cultural megablocs (PAC) = Letters in parentheses after each grouping give its database code (see GeoCodebook)

Defining the boundaries of 'Christian'

* A Christian = a professing/confessing believer in Christ confronts the Yes/No veracity of the 50 items at left which collectively are unique to Christianity and which thus define the boundary between what is and what is not Christianity.

* A Christian = anyone who answers Yes to all 50 items, each in question form as: 'De you accept or believe in this item as true?'

Minimum definition

* A Christian = anyone who answers Yes to 6 non-negotiable core items: 8, 9, 15, 16, 20, 21.

* A Christian = anyone who answers Yes to a Top Ten = 21, 12, 15, 16, 30, 31, 35, 38, 43, 48.

Varieties of Christian

* A mainstream Christian = anyone within the heavy black circle (above), either O, R, A, P, I church members, or unaffiliated.

* An Evangelical = a Christian believer emphasizing as essential 7 items in particular: 11, 15, 16, 17, 30, 31, 48.

* A pentecostal/charismatic = a Christian believer emphasizing as essential 6 items in particular: 14, 21, 22, 23, 27, 29.

* A Great Commission Christian = a Christian believer emphasizing 9 items in particular: 12, 15, 16, 21, 23, 30, 33, 38, 40.

* A marginal Christian = a believer who rejects mainstream Christianity especially one or more of items 1, 5, 7, 11, 17, 20, or 26, displacing the Bible as unique by adding an additional source of divine revelation.
Global Table A. 50 Shared Goals: status of global mission, AD 1900
to AD 2025

 Year: 1900 1970

GLOBAL POPULATION
 1. Total population 1,619,625,000 3,692,495,000
 2. Urban dwellers (urbanites) 232,695,000 1,362,295,000
 3. Rural dwellers 1,386,930,000 2,330,200,000
 4. Adult population (over 15s) 1,073,621,000 2,313,053,000
 5. Literates 296,146,000 1,476,797,000
 6. Nonliterates 777,475,000 836,256,000
WORLDWIDE EXPANSION OF CITIES
 7. Metropolises (over 100,000
 population) 300 2,400
 8. Megacities (over 1 million
 population) 20 161
 9. Urban poor 100 million 650 million
10. Urban slum-dwellers 20 million 260 million
GLOBAL POPULATION BY RELIGION
11. Total of all distinct organized
 religions 1,000 6,000
12. Christians (total all kinds)
 (=World C) 558,131,000 1,234,339,000
13. Muslims 199,914,000 549,226,000
14. Hindus 203,003,000 462,379,000
15. Nonreligious 3,024,000 532,339,000
16. Chinese universists 380,006,000 231,866,000
17. Buddhists 127,077,000 232,667,000
18. Ethnoreligionists 117,558,000 163,477,000
19. Atheists 226,000 165,391,000
20. New-Religionists
 (Neoreligionists) 5,951,000 78,324,000
21. Sikhs 2,962,000 10,618,000
22. Jews 12,292,000 15,097,000
23. Non-Christians (=Worlds A and B) 1,061,494,000 2,458,156,000
GLOBAL CHRISTIANITY
24. Total Christians as % of world
 (=World C) 34.5 33.4
25. Unaffiliated Christians 36,489,000 105,626,000
26. Affiliated Christians (church
 members) 521,642,000 1,128,713,000
27. Church attenders 469,303,000 885,777,000
28. Evangelicals 71,726,000 98,358,000
29. Great Commission Christians 77,931,000 277,153,000
30. Pentecostals/Charismatics/
 Neocharismatics 981,000 72,223,000
31. Average Christian martyrs per
 year 34,400 377,000
MEMBERSHIP BY 6 CONTINENTS, 21 UN REGIONS
32. Roman Catholics 266,546,000 665,475,000
33. Independents 7,931,000 96,926,000
34. Protestants 103,024,000 211,052,000
35. Orthodox 115,844,000 139,646,000
36. Anglicans 30,571,000 47,409,000
37. Marginal Christians 928,000 11,100,000
MEMBERSHIP BY 6 CONTINENTS, 21 UN REGIONS
38. Africa (5 regions) 8,756,000 117,227,000
39. Asia (4 regions) 20,759,000 96,460,000
40. Europe (including Russia; 4
 regions) 368,209,000 467,935,000
41. Latin America (3 regions) 60,027,000 263,561,000
42. Northern America (1 region) 59,570,000 168,943,000
43. Oceania (4 regions) 4,322,000 14,587,000
CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATIONS
44. Denominations 1,900 18,800
45. Congregations (worship centers) 400,000 1,450,000
46. Service agencies 1,500 14,100
47. Foreign-mission sending agencies 600 2,200
CONCILIARISM: ONGOING COUNCILS OF CHURCHES
48. Confessional councils (CWCs, at
 world level) 40 150
49. International councils of
 churches 10 36
50. National councils of churches 19 283
51. Local councils of churches 70 2,600
CHRISTIAN WORKERS (clergy, laypersons)
52. Nationals (citizens; all
 denominations) 1,050,000 2,350,000
53. Aliens (Foreign missionaries) 62,000 240,000
CHRISTIAN FINANCE (in US$, per year)
54. Personal income of church
 members, $ 270 billion 4,100 billion
55. Giving to Christian causes, $ 8 billion 70 billion
56. Churches' income, $ 7 billion 50 billion
57. Parachurch and institutional
 income, $ 1 billion 20 billion
58. Cost-effectiveness (cost per
 baptism, $) 17,500 128,000
59. Ecclesiastical crime, $ 300,000 5,000,000
60. Income of global foreign
 missions, $ 200,000,000 3.0 billion
61. Computers in Christian use
 (numbers) 0 1,000
CHRISTIAN LITERATURE (titles, not copies)
62. Books about Christianity 300,000 1,800,000
63. Christian periodicals 3,500 23,000
SCRIPTURE DISTRIBUTION (all sources, per year/p.a.)
64. Bibles, p.a. 5,452,600 25,000,000
65. Scriptures including gospels,
 selections, p.a. 20 million 281 million
66. Bible density (copies 1n place) 108 million 443 million
CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING
67. Total monthly listeners/ viewers 0 750,000,000
68. over Christian stations 0 150,000,000
69. over secular stations 0 650,000,000
CHRISTIAN URBAN MISSION
70. Non-Christian megacities 5 65
71. New non-Christian urban dwellers
 per day 5,200 51,100
72. Urban Christians 159,600,000 660,800,000
CHRISTIAN EVANGELISM
73. Evangelism-hours per year 5 billion 25 billion
74. Hearer-hours (offers) per year 10 billion 99 billion
75. Disciple-opportunities (offers)
 per capita per year 6 27
WORLDS EVANGELIZATION
76. Unevangelized population
 (=World A) 879,672,000 1,641,300,000
77. Unevangelized as % of world 54.3 44.4
78. World evangelization plans since
 AD 30 250 510

 Year: mid-2000 Trend
 % p.a.

GLOBAL POPULATION
 1. Total population 6,070,581,000 1.22
 2. Urban dwellers (urbanites) 2,878,861,000 2.05
 3. Rural dwellers 3,191,720,000 0.44
 4. Adult population (over 15s) 4,241,871,000 1.66
 5. Literates 3,251,554,000 1.65
 6. Nonliterates 990,317,000 1.70
WORLDWIDE EXPANSION OF CITIES
 7. Metropolises (over 100,000
 population) 4,050 1.77
 8. Megacities (over 1 million
 population) 402 1.90
 9. Urban poor 1,400 million 3.09
10. Urban slum-dwellers 700 million 3.29
GLOBAL POPULATION BY RELIGION
11. Total of all distinct organized
 religions 9,900 1.62
12. Christians (total all kinds)
 (=World C) 2,000,909,000 1.25
13. Muslims 1,196,451,000 1.90
14. Hindus 808,175,000 1.38
15. Nonreligious 762,099,000 0.23
16. Chinese universists 390,850,000 0.65
17. Buddhists 362,374,000 0.90
18. Ethnoreligionists 239,103,000 1.21
19. Atheists 147,223,000 0.49
20. New-Religionists
 (Neoreligionists) 103,847,000 0.78
21. Sikhs 23,512,000 1.48
22. Jews 14,528,000 0.92
23. Non-Christians (=Worlds A and B) 4,069,672,000 1.21
GLOBAL CHRISTIANITY
24. Total Christians as % of world
 (=World C) 33.0 0.03
25. Unaffiliated Christians 105,387,000 1.35
26. Affiliated Christians (church
 members) 1,895,522,000 1.25
27. Church attenders 1,359,420,000 1.04
28. Evangelicals 224,791,000 2.11
29. Great Commission Christians 650,094,000 1.13
30. Pentecostals/Charismatics/
 Neocharismatics 526,916,000 2.08
31. Average Christian martyrs per
 year 160,000 1.11
MEMBERSHIP BY 6 CONTINENTS, 21 UN REGIONS
32. Roman Catholics 1,055,651,000 1.12
33. Independents 379,085,000 2.23
34. Protestants 347,764,000 1.52
35. Orthodox 214,436,000 0.45
36. Anglicans 75,164,000 1.24
37. Marginal Christians 29,501,000 2.79
MEMBERSHIP BY 6 CONTINENTS, 21 UN REGIONS
38. Africa (5 regions) 346,415,000 2.33
39. Asia (4 regions) 302,651,000 2.51
40. Europe (including Russia; 4
 regions) 532,107,000 -0.06
41. Latin America (3 regions) 477,149,000 1.35
42. Northern America (1 region) 216,221,000 0.46
43. Oceania (4 regions) 20,976,000 1.15
CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATIONS
44. Denominations 33,800 1.97
45. Congregations (worship centers) 3,448,000 1.50
46. Service agencies 23,000 2.06
47. Foreign-mission sending agencies 4,000 1.64
CONCILIARISM: ONGOING COUNCILS OF CHURCHES
48. Confessional councils (CWCs, at
 world level) 310 2.04
49. International councils of
 churches 59 1.10
50. National councils of churches 598 1.50
51. Local councils of churches 9,000 2.20
CHRISTIAN WORKERS (clergy, laypersons)
52. Nationals (citizens; all
 denominations) 5,104,000 0.97
53. Aliens (Foreign missionaries) 420,000 1.08
CHRISTIAN FINANCE (in US$, per year)
54. Personal income of church
 members, $ 15,230 billion 0.44
55. Giving to Christian causes, $ 270 billion 4.91
56. Churches' income, $ 108 billion 4.42
57. Parachurch and institutional
 income, $ 162 billion 5.23
58. Cost-effectiveness (cost per
 baptism, $) 330,000 2.80
59. Ecclesiastical crime, $ 16 billion 5.77
60. Income of global foreign
 missions, $ 15 billion 5.70
61. Computers in Christian use
 (numbers) 328 million 5.80
CHRISTIAN LITERATURE (titles, not copies)
62. Books about Christianity 4,800,000 3.08
63. Christian periodicals 35,000 4.28
SCRIPTURE DISTRIBUTION (all sources, per year/p.a.)
64. Bibles, p.a. 53,700,000 4.96
65. Scriptures including gospels,
 selections, p.a. 4,600 million 2.24
66. Bible density (copies 1n place) 1,400 million 1.97
CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING
67. Total monthly listeners/ viewers 2,150,000,000 2.30
68. over Christian stations 600,000,000 3.13
69. over secular stations 1,810,000,000 1.76
CHRISTIAN URBAN MISSION
70. Non-Christian megacities 226 1.14
71. New non-Christian urban dwellers
 per day 129,000 1.73
72. Urban Christians 1,160,000,000 1.59
CHRISTIAN EVANGELISM
73. Evangelism-hours per year 165 billion 3.86
74. Hearer-hours (offers) per year 938 billion 6.23
75. Disciple-opportunities (offers)
 per capita per year 155 4.97
WORLDS EVANGELIZATION
76. Unevangelized population
 (=World A) 1,718,072,000 0.84
77. Unevangelized as % of world 28.3 -0.38
78. World evangelization plans since
 AD 30 1,500 2.80

 Year: mid-2006 2025

GLOBAL POPULATION
 1. Total population 6,529,426,000 7,851,455,000
 2. Urban dwellers (urbanites) 3,252,255,000 4,572,885,000
 3. Rural dwellers 3,277,171,000 3,278,570,000
 4. Adult population (over 15s) 4,682,974,000 5,950,587,000
 5. Literates 3,587,095,000 5,015,884,000
 6. Nonliterates 1,095,879,000 934,703,000
WORLDWIDE EXPANSION OF CITIES
 7. Metropolises (over 100,000
 population) 4,500 6,500
 8. Megacities (over 1 million
 population) 450 650
 9. Urban poor 1,680 million 3,000 million
10. Urban slum-dwellers 850 million 1,600 million
GLOBAL POPULATION BY RELIGION
11. Total of all distinct organized
 religions 10,900 15,000
12. Christians (total all kinds)
 (=World C) 2,156,350,000 2,630,559,000
13. Muslims 1,339,392,000 1,861,360,000
14. Hindus 877,552,000 1,031,168,000
15. Nonreligious 772,497,000 817,091,000
16. Chinese universists 406,233,000 431,956,000
17. Buddhists 382,482,000 459,448,000
18. Ethnoreligionists 257,009,000 270,210,000
19. Atheists 151,628,000 151,742,000
20. New-Religionists
 (Neoreligionists) 108,794,000 122,188,000
21. Sikhs 25,673,000 31,985,000
22. Jews 15,351,000 16,895,000
23. Non-Christians (=Worlds A and B) 4,373,076,000 5,220,896,000
GLOBAL CHRISTIANITY
24. Total Christians as % of world
 (=World C) 33.0 33.5
25. Unaffiliated Christians 114,200,000 122,673,000
26. Affiliated Christians (church
 members) 2,042,150,000 2,507,886,000
27. Church attenders 1,446,457,000 1,760,568,000
28. Evangelicals 254,797,000 348,648,000
29. Great Commission Christians 695,229,000 853,179,000
30. Pentecostals/Charismatics/
 Neocharismatics 596,096,000 798,320,000
31. Average Christian martyrs per
 year 171,000 210,000
MEMBERSHIP BY 6 CONTINENTS, 21 UN REGIONS
32. Roman Catholics 1,128,883,000 1,334,338,000
33. Independents 432,832,000 607,670,000
34. Protestants 380,799,000 489,084,000
35. Orthodox 220,290,000 235,834,000
36. Anglicans 80,922,000 107,557,000
37. Marginal Christians 34,799,000 49,768,000
MEMBERSHIP BY 6 CONTINENTS, 21 UN REGIONS
38. Africa (5 regions) 397,676,000 595,821,000
39. Asia (4 regions) 351,234,000 498,120,000
40. Europe (including Russia; 4
 regions) 530,090,000 513,706,000
41. Latin America (3 regions) 516,974,000 623,355,000
42. Northern America (1 region) 222,292,000 250,186,000
43. Oceania (4 regions) 22,461,000 26,691,000
CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATIONS
44. Denominations 38,000 55,000
45. Congregations (worship centers) 3,770,000 5,000,000
46. Service agencies 26,000 36,000
47. Foreign-mission sending agencies 4,410 6,000
CONCILIARISM: ONGOING COUNCILS OF CHURCHES
48. Confessional councils (CWCs, at
 world level) 350 600
49. International councils of
 churches 63 80
50. National councils of churches 650 870
51. Local councils of churches 10,300 15,500
CHRISTIAN WORKERS (clergy, laypersons)
52. Nationals (citizens; all
 denominations) 5,409,000 6,500,000
53. Aliens (Foreign missionaries) 448,000 550,000
CHRISTIAN FINANCE (in US$, per year)
54. Personal income of church
 members, $ 15,930 billion 26,000 billion
55. Giving to Christian causes, $ 360 billion 870 billion
56. Churches' income, $ 140 billion 300 billion
57. Parachurch and institutional
 income, $ 220 billion 570 billion
58. Cost-effectiveness (cost per
 baptism, $) 349,000 650,000
59. Ecclesiastical crime, $ 22 billion 65 billion
60. Income of global foreign
 missions, $ 21 billion 60 billion
61. Computers in Christian use
 (numbers) 460 million 1,200 million
CHRISTIAN LITERATURE (titles, not copies)
62. Books about Christianity 5,957,000 11,800,000
63. Christian periodicals 45,000 100,000
SCRIPTURE DISTRIBUTION (all sources, per year/p.a.)
64. Bibles, p.a. 71,787,000 180,000,000
65. Scriptures including gospels,
 selections, p.a. 5,250 million 8,000 million
66. Bible density (copies 1n place) 1,570 million 2,280 million
CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING
67. Total monthly listeners/ viewers 2,465,000,000 3,800,000,000
68. over Christian stations 722,000,000 1,300,000,000
69. over secular stations 2,010,000,000 2,800,000,000
CHRISTIAN URBAN MISSION
70. Non-Christian megacities 242 300
71. New non-Christian urban dwellers
 per day 143,000 200,000
72. Urban Christians 1,275,000,000 1,720,000,000
CHRISTIAN EVANGELISM
73. Evangelism-hours per year 210 billion 425 billion
74. Hearer-hours (offers) per year 1,350 billion 4,250 billion
75. Disciple-opportunities (offers)
 per capita per year 207 541
WORLDS EVANGELIZATION
76. Unevangelized population
 (=World A) 1,806,065,000 2,039,813,000
77. Unevangelized as % of world 27.7 26.0
78. World evangelization plans since
 AD 30 1,770 3,000

Global Table B. 50 Shared Resources: the world's 350 Christian
World Communions (CWCs), with each's own members in AD 2006

A Christian World Communion (CWC) is defined as an ongoing body
uniting only churches and denominations with one similar ecclesiastical
tradition or characteristic. All names in this listing are given in
English with vernacular titles added only where necessary to establish
identity. This 10-category ranking is by attitude to ecumenical
confessionalism (1 = maximum involvement, 10 = minimum or zero
involvement).

Titles Members

1. Conference of Secretaries of Christian World Communions (CSCWC,
1957-2006
Anglican Consultative Council (ACC)/Anglican Communion 79,739,000
Baptist World Alliance (BWA) 101,000,000
Church of the Brethren (German Pietists/Dunkers) 346,000
Disciples Ecumenical Committee for Consultation (DECC) 1,500,000
Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople 17,594,000
Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC) 507,000
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) 25,000,000
International Moravian Church in Unity of Brethren 1,042,000
International Old Catholic Bishops Conference (IOCBC) 910,000
Lutheran World Federation (LWF) 80,000,000
Mennonite World Conference (MWC) 2,883,000
Orthodox Patriarchate of Moscow 111,404,000
Pentecostal World Fellowship (PWF) 29,821,000
Reformed Ecumenical Council (REC) 7,347,000
Roman Catholic Church (RCC) (13 Patriarchates) 1,129,685,000
Salvation Army (SA) 2,214,000
World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) 60,000,000
World Convention of Churches of Christ (WCCC) 10,000,000
World Council of Churches (WCC/COE/ORK) 486,000,000
World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) 335,000,000
World Methodist Council (WMC) 70,226,000

2. Not in CSCWC directly but related through a member participant
Bulgarian Orthodox Patriarchate of Sofia 11,769,000
Catholic Charismatic Renewal (CCR, ICCRS) 120,000,000
Council of Catholic Patriarchs in the East (10
 Patriarchates) 5,400,000
Global Forum of Christian Churches and Ecumenical
 Organizations 900,000,000
Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria 889,000
Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch 1,026,000
Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem 115,000
International Pentecostal Holiness Church (IPHC) 1,052,000
Orthodox Apostolic Catholicate of Georgia 2,536,000
Romanian Orthodox Patriarchate of Bucharest 19,780,000
Sacred Congregation for Bishops (3 Patriarchates) 884,875,000
Sacred Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples
 (SCEP) 220,304,000
Sacred Congregation for the Oriental Churches (6
 Patriarchal Synods) 15,312,000
Serbian Orthodox Patriarchate of Belgrade 7,642,000
Synod of Bishops (Synodus Episcoporum) 300,000,000
Waldensian Evangelical Church 54,000

3. WCC-related bodies not members of CSCWC because never invited
Ancient Assyrian Patriarchate of the East 500,000
Armenian Apostolic Catholicossate of Cilicia 852,000
Armenian Apostolic Patriarchate of Constantinople 66,000
Armenian Apostolic Patriarchate of Echmiadzin 5,593,000
Armenian Apostolic Patriarchate of Jerusalem 18,100
Brazil for Christ Evangelical Pentecostal Church
 (OBPC) 2,000,000
Consultation on Uniting and United Churches (CUUC) 54,205,000
Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria 10,354,000
Czechoslovak Hussite Church (CCH/CHC) 221,000
Eritrean Orthodox Patriarchate of Asmara 1,904,000
Ethiopian Orthodox Patriarchate of Addis Ababa 26,093,000
Great and Holy Council of the Orthodox Church (9
 Patriarchates) 185,000,000
International Charismatic Consultation on World
 Evangelization 5,100,000
Mar Thoma Syrian Church of Malabar 1,115,000
Organization of African Instituted Churches (OAIC) 33,002,000
Oriental Orthodox Churches Conference (10
 Patriarchates) 49,974,000
Orthodox Syrian Catholicate of the East (OSCE) 2,575,000
Philippine Independent Church (IFI/PIC) 3,425,000
Syriac Orthodox Catholicossate of India 1,300,000
Universal Syriac Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch 1,219,000

4. Monoconfessional Anglican minicommunions
Anglican Communion Network (ACN) 1,000,000
International Communion of the Charismatic Episcopal
 Church (ICCEC) 950,000
Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) 280,000
14 other schismatic communions ex Anglicanism/
 Episcopahanism, including: Anglican Church
 International Communion, Anglican Orthodox
 Communion (ACC), Communion of the Evangelical
 Episcopal Church (CEEC), Reformed Episcopal Church
 (REC), et alia 7,600,000

5. African/Amerindian/Asian/Black/Latino/Oceanic minicommunions
Catholic Apostolic Church of Brazil (ICAB) 3,000,000
Celestial Church of Christ (CCC/ECC) 4,436,000
Christian Congregation of Brazil (Congregagao Crista
 do Brasil) 3,120,000
Church of Christ/Iglesia ni Cristo (Manalista) 4,324,000
Church of God in Christ (CoGiC) 10,000,000
Church of Jesus Christ through Simon Kimbangu (Eglise
 Kimbanguiste) 8,990,000
Cornerstone Gospel Church (Igreja Pedra Fundamental,
 IPF) 3,200,000
Deeper Life Bible Church (DLBC) 9,000,000
Indian Pentecostal Church of God (IPCG) 977,000
International Evangelical Gypsy Social Association
 (ASNITE) 390,000
Jesus is Lord Fellowship (JILF) 2,277,000
Pentecostal Methodist Church of Chile (IMPC) 720,000
Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG/IURD) 5,431,000
Zion Christian Church (ZCC) 9,100,000
50 other Neocharismatic or Independent Non-White
 minicommunions each with under a million members
 worldwide who maintain or function as a separate
 communion: AACJM, AIPCA, CGMI, IFDA, IPDA, NMBCA,
 et alia 40,000,000

6. European/North American monodenominational Protestant minicommunions
70 major Protestant global denominations each linked
 with its worldwide daughter churches to form a
 separate communion: AEF, AIM, ARPC, AWM, CAM, CBI,
 Christian Brethren (CMML), EPC, LAM, CD, OM, OMF,
 OMS, SBC (IMB), SIM, TEAM, WEC, Worldwide Church of 17,084,000
 God (WCG), et alia

7. White-led Neocharismatic communions uninterested in CSCWC
Chaplaincy of Full Gospel Churches (CFGC) 8,385,000
Coalition of Spirit-filled Churches (CSC) 500,000
International Communion of Charismatic Churches (ICCC) 6,000,000
International Fellowship of Charismatic Churches
 (IFCC) 2,000,000
Manna Church International (Mana Igreja Crista) 200,000
Morning Star International 1,100,000
Union of Messianic Jewish Congregations (UMJC) 142,000
Willow Creek Association of Churches (WCAC) 804,000
30 other White-led Neo-Apostolic meganetworks each
 globally >50,000, plus a handful of smaller but
 significant bodies: AFMA, AIMS, EFICC, ICF, SACOC,
 UICC, et alia 22,815,000

8. Conservative communions hostile to ecumenism, to WCC, to CSCWC
Alliance World Fellowship (AWF) 4,366,000
Apostolic World Christian Fellowship (AWCF) 6,639,000
Assembly Hall Churches (Local Churches, Little Flock) 2,323,000
Baptist Bible Fellowship International (BBFI) 2,500,000
Christian Holiness Association (CHA) 5,000,000
Global Network of Mission Structures (GNMS) 24,000,000
International Conference of Reformed Churches (ICRC) 132,000
International Federation of Free Evangelical Churches
 (IFFEC) 846,000
International Lutheran Council (ILC) 3,546,000
International Spiritual Baptist Ministerial Council 20,000
New Apostolic Church (Neuapostolische Kirche: NAC/NAK) 11,098,000
Old Ritualist Churches (Old Believers, Old Orthodox) 1,899,000
True Jesus Church (TIC) 1,833,000
Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community
 Churches (UFMCC) 171,000
World Assemblies of God Fellowship (WAGF) 52,220,000
World Council of Biblical Churches (WCBC) 8,400
World Evangelical Congregational Fellowship (WECF) 53,900
World Fellowship of Reformed Churches (WFRC) 1,109,000
40 other Conservative networks hostile to historic
 confessions: ABWE, BMM, EFMA, IARPC, IFMA, NTM, UFM,
 UPC, et alia 12,212,000

9. Worldwide communions with heterodox christologies
Church of Christ, Scientist 2,500,000
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (CJCLdS) 12,291,000
International Alliance of Churches of the Truth 800,000
International Council of Unitarians and Universalists
 (ICUU) 282,000
Jehovah's Christian Witnesses (Watch Tower, IBRA, JWs) 16,541,000
Unification Church (Holy Spirit Association for World
 Christianity) 839,000
40 other non- or antitrinitarian heterodox communions:
 IACT, IARF, IGAS, INTA, et alia 2,000,000

10. Unattached denominations with no CWC, no
 minicommunion, no claim to be one, no wider
 communion nor formal relations with other
 denominations of similar ecclesiastical tradition 206,353,000

Total combined memberships in 350 CWCs 5,766,542,000
Doubly-affiliated members (counted in 2 or more CWCs) -3,901,042,000
Total individual members in 350 CWCs throughout
 Christian world 1,865,500,000


This four-page report, which is also available as a separate off print, was prepared by David B. Barrett, a contributing editor, Todd M. Johnson, and Peter F. Crossing, who publish widely in the field of missiometrics. Most subjects mentioned in this report are expanded in detail in their World Christian Encyclopedia (1982, 2001) and World Christian Trends (2001) and in www. WorldChristianDatabase.org.
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Date:Jan 1, 2006
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