Printer Friendly

Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, Hernan Galperin, and Manuel Castells (Dirs.). Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina/ Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, Hernan Galperin, y Manuel Castells (Dirs.). Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina.

Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, Hernan Galperin, and Manuel Castells (Dirs.). Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina. Barcelona, Spain: Ariel/Fundacion Telefonica, 2011, 392 pp., ISBN 978-8408-09969-7, 16.50 [euro] (paperback).

It is commonly acknowledged that the adoption of information and communication technologies (ICTs) began to proliferate in the mid-1990s. The creation of the first graphical Web browsers--Mosaic and Netscape Navigator--and, especially, the commercialization of the Internet made it possible for the general public to begin appropriating technologies and tools that would change their lives. Though relegated to the background, another factor that would alter people's lives was the 1995 implementation of the GSM network, the first digital network for mobile communications to enable mobile phones to send SMS, faxes, and general data without wires.

The different deployment of communication infrastructures around the globe since the Industrial Revolution, along with greater device and service affordability, implies that the paths of adoption of the Internet and the mobile phone have not run on parallel tracks. Fixed-broadband subscriptions were 5.6 times greater in higher-income countries than in lower-income ones, with the latter growing at a very low rate. Meanwhile, the difference in mobile-cellular subscriptions was "only" 1.6 times higher for richer countries, but the trend indicated a quick closing of the gap (ITU, 2011), even though mobile broadband followed the path of fixed broadband.

Statements describing the potential of mobile phones for development--or "M4D" in the jargon--have ranged from being just optimistic to promising to end poverty around the globe. Communications, papers, even a full series of conferences--Karlstad (Sweden), 2008; Kampala (Uganda), 2012; Dehli (India), 2012--have been devoted to the topic. (2) It is in this framework that Comunicacion Movil yDesarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina [Mobile Communication and Economic and Social Development in Latin America] appears to provide a thorough and well-structured analysis of mobile phones for development, from theory to practice, from quantitative aggregate analysis to qualitative case studies.

This work, not coincidentally, shares two authors with another book, Mobile Communication and Society, by Castells, Fernandez-Ardevol, Linchuan Qiu, and Sey (2006). In that earlier work's 8th chapter, titled "Wireless Communication and Global Development," the authors briefly reviewed impacts that mobile phones were already having on the lives of the poorest. Both works, then, could be viewed as a pair: the first (2006) presenting a general approach to the adoption and impact of mobile communications (mostly from a sociological point of view) and the second (2011) continuing the former's thrust, but framed in Latin America and with a development studies approach.

Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina begins with three powerful statements: (a) Mobile communications are not about mobility, but about permanent connectedness; (b) this permanent connectedness enables the pervasiveness of networks in all matters of life; and (c) pervasiveness of access to information and communications usually means autonomy and thus empowerment. Besides health (the most basic of human needs), all others, from education to governance, can be understood or defined in terms of information and communication.

The three first chapters provide a broader explanation to those issues, heavily relying on data from different sources. These chapters offer quantitative evidence on mobile phones' impact on livelihoods and the economy, going beyond the purview of other (valuable) works like Wicander's (2010) M4D Overview 1.0: The 2009 Introduction to Mobile for Development, which purposefully limits itself to the revision of the main literature on the topic.

What the authors succeed in proving, statistically, and with significant results, is that mobile phones have a positive impact upon economic growth. This impact is strongly related to market efficiency due to more (and better) access to and management of information. Others, such as Donner and Escobari (2010), have also suggested this impact, and it is the seed of Duncombe's (2012) interesting research framework.

More important, though, than the relationship of causality to mobile telephony and economic growth is how it works. The authors do not find the usual direct impact on the economy, but instead the result of network effects (Torrent-Sellens, 2009). So, the more established the network is, the smaller the effects of mobile phones on economic growth. The poorer the country is, the higher the impact on economic growth of mobile phones. As a country's economy becomes healthier and richer, mobile phones play a lesser role, yielding increasing returns but decreasing marginal returns.

Network effects on inequality are unexpected: They show no effect on either reducing or increasing inequality. Adoption rates of mobile telephony are already very high in the region, with an average coverage of 90% of the population. Practically any strata of society already has access to mobile telephony; thus, there is no significant difference in being able to access mobile infrastructures and devices. So, while mobile phones do decrease poverty, it is a global shift in the economy that they enable, while maintaining the inner relationships of economic power and thus also maintaining the existing inequalities.

Part of this upward shift in the economy can also be seen in the positive impact on employment. Mobile phones make possible higher degrees of dis-intermediation of the job market, as well as the opportunity to move freely within market-rigid structures. Access to more and better information enables autonomous workers to get jobs or to identify where work needs to be done.

The authors also stress the fact that this autonomy does not only happen in the economic sphere: Outside of the economy, autonomy equals security and the feeling of security, as distant communication reduces the exposure to different kinds of violence and hazards.

The increase of autonomy should not be misunderstood as leading to an increase of the levels of isolation of citizens or firms. As the authors have explained, related to the creation of networks and their effects on the economy, autonomy is accompanied by closer bonds with peers, both at the personal and professional levels. Connectivity among people is increased, along with the feeling of community and the sense of shared identity.

This sense of connectivity leads the authors to note that their "research confirms that in Latin America communication is organized around the mobile phone, the latter being presented as an alternative to services that never became massive in the region" (p. 323). Despite barriers associated with the affordability of services and devices, people in Latin America have been creative in the adoption of the new technology--due to the lack of most restraints--and employ it in ways that were unthinkable in richer countries.

Chapters 4, 5, and 6 of Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina provide analysis of cases that help to add context and real-life experiences to what cold and raw data reveal on the spreadsheet. This is where the reader can find the answer to the $1 million-dollar question: Why would people spend such a relatively high amount of their income on communications rather than on food. The short answer, though obvious, is seldom answered by academic literature in such a straightforward manner--because it is worth doing so. The cases analyzed provide personal interviews and aggregated data on how important mobile phones are for socialization, employability, and inclusion in general.

Indeed, a tacit point is made in the cases where communications are not considered a driver of inclusion, but of nonexclusion. While the results might seem similar at the end--communications equals inclusion--the points of departure totally differ and considering the mobile phone as a way to fight exclusion is more coherent with what evidence also tells about the nonreduction of inequality. These facts strengthen the hypothesis that mobile phones increasingly are a general purpose technology, which is often easier to identify, not by its positive impact but by its negative impact when it is not generally adopted.

Chapter 7, even if it speaks about youth culture and mobile telephony, can be interpreted differently--how institutions in general, particularly the educational system, are lagging behind the evolution of technology. The analysis of youth culture and its relationship to mobile phones perfectly depicts how educators and policy makers should definitely rethink their teaching strategies and leverage the power of mobile technology and mobile (read here "ubiquitous") access to knowledge. The transcripts of some interviews that the authors conducted with youth do not speak about a digital divide between different generations but about a sheer "mind-set divide."

This mind-set divide does not belong to the usual gender discussion. The work here showcases how the so-called gender divide (i.e., women are less prone to be technically proficient than are men) is a result of other more basic differences in the offline world. When women have the chance to use ICTs for their benefit--as in the case of Peruvian women in rural markets--not only do they do so eagerly but the mobile devices reinforce their important role on their local economies. Hilbert (2011) also demonstrates this for the same region; it is likely that forthcoming scholarly literature will take this into account.

There are two topics that some readers would expect to see treated in deeper detail--the knowledge gap hypothesis and the leapfrog hypothesis. Not that these issues are not constantly present in this work, but an explicit mention would be welcome.

Regarding the knowledge gap hypothesis (Tichenor, Donohue, & Olien, 1970) the book tacitly confirms the findings of others (Schradie, 2011; Warschauer & Matuchniak, 2010; Yang & Zhiyong Lan, 2010): Technology adoption does not affect inequality, but social inequality does affect unequal technology adoption. Thus, even if the rates of penetration are very high, those in the poorest strata of society are not accessing mobile telephony or broadband. Even when there is a general adoption, socioeconomic inequalities are replicated as inequalities in mobile adoption or inequalities in communications, especially at the usage level (i.e., what for and how).

The leapfrog hypothesis is directly addressed by Castells et al. (2006) in Chapter 8 of Mobile Communication and Society when they note that "there is no overwhelming evidence to support the leapfrog hypothesis in terms of eliminating stages of economic development" (p. 216)--only evidence of closing the gap between the richest and the poorest. Thus, the "observations document the excessive optimism that surrounds this new magic bullet of development" (p. 243). This lack of evidence to support the leapfrogging hypothesis has already been identified (Howard, 2007; Pena-Lopez, 2009; Wang, Wei, & Wong, 2010) and is again supported by Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina. But a more explicit statement would be desirable.

In fact, this is probably the book's strength and its weakness--its neutral, objective, academic approach to the topic of mobiles for development. This approach is a strength, as the work is rich in data, well-measured statements, and detailed examples that provide the reader with sufficient information to draw one's own conclusions. But, on the other hand, the work keeps a safe distance from entering into providing explicit advice to policy makers, even if there are plenty of conclusions that are undeniably addressed to them. One would have nevertheless expected a last part--or chapter--that decision makers could use as an easy and understandable takeaway they could staple to their walls. Providing solid advice should not be at odds with academic rigor.

References

Castells, M., Fernandez-Ardevol, M., Linchuan Qiu, J., & Sey, A. (2006). Mobile Communication and Society. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Donner, J. (2008). Research approaches to mobile use in the developing world: A review of the literature. Abingdon, VA: Taylor & Francis.

Donner, J., & Escobari, M. X. (2010). A review of evidence on mobile use by micro and small enterprises in developing countries. Journal of International Development, 22(5), 641-658.

Duncombe, R. (2012). Understanding mobile phone impact on livelihoods in developing countries: A new research framework. (Development Informatics Working Paper Series, No.48/2012.) Manchester, UK: Institute for Development Policy and Management. Retrieved from http://www.sed .manchester.ac.uk/idpm/research/publications/wp/ di/di_wp48.htm

Fernandez-Ardevol, M., & Ros, A. (2009). Communication technologies in Latin America and Africa: A multidisciplinary perspective. Barcelona, Spain: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.

Fernandez-Ardevol, M., Galperin, H., & Castells, M. (Dirs.). (2011). Comunicacion movil y desarrollo economico y social en America Latina. Barcelona, Spain: Ariel, Fundacion Telefonica.

Hilbert, M. R. (2011). Digital gender divide or technologically empowered women in developing countries? A typical case of lies, damned lies, and statistics. Women's Studies International Forum, 34(6), 479-489.

Howard, P. N. (2007). Testing the leap-frog hypothesis. The impact of existing infrastructure and telecommunications policy on the global digital divide. Information, Communication & Society, 10(2), 133-157.

International Telecommunication Union. (2011). Measuring the information society 2011. Geneva, Switzerland: ITU. Retrieved from http:// www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/publications/idi/2011/ Material/MIS_2011_without_annex_5.pdf

Pena-Lopez, I. (2009). Measuring digital development for policy-making: Models, stages, characteristics and causes. Barcelona, Spain: ICTlogy. Retrieved from http://phd.ictlogy.net

Schradie, J. (2011). The digital production gap: The digital divide and Web 2.0 collide. Poetics, 39(2), 145-168.

Tichenor, P. J., Donohue, G. A., & Olien, C. N. (1970). Mass media flow and differential growth in knowledge. Public Opinion Quarterly, 34(2), 159-170.

Torrent-Sellens, J. (2009). Knowledge, networks and economic activity: An analysis of the effects of the network on the knowledge-based economy. UOC Papers, 8. Barcelona, Spain: UOC. Retrieved from http://www.uoc.edu/uocpapers/8/dt/eng/ torrent.pdf

Wang, Z., Wei, S., & Wong, A. (2010). Does a leapfrogging growth strategy raise growth rate? Some international evidence. (NBER Working Paper No. 16390.) Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

Warschauer, M., & Matuchniak, T. (2010). New technology and digital worlds: Analyzing evidence of equity in access, use, and outcomes. Review of Research in Education, 34(1), 179-225.

Wicander, G. (2010). M4D Overview 1.0: the 2009 introduction to mobile for development. Karlstad, Sweden: Karlstad University. Retrieved from http://kau.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2 :320676/FULLTEXT02

Yang, L., & Zhiyong Lan, G. (2010). Internet's impact on expert-citizen interactions in public policymaking--A meta analysis. Government Information Quarterly, 27(4), 431-441.

Ismael Pena-Lopez

ismael@ictlogy.net

Researcher

Information Society & ICT4D

Internet Interdisciplinary Institute

Lecturer, Law & Political Science

Open University of Catalonia

Spain

(1.) Managing Editor's Note: ITID Editor-in-Chief Francois Bar and Guest Editor Hernan Galperin have recused themselves from the editorial process of this review as they are co-authors of this book.

(2.) For a quick update, please see also Donner (2008) and Fernandez-Ardevol & Ros (2009). @@ Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, Hernan Galperin, y Manuel Castells (Dirs.). Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina. Barcelona: Ariel/Fundacion Telefonica, 2011, 392 pp., ISBN 978-84-0809969-7, [euro]16.50 (tapa blanda).

Esta comunmente aceptado que la adopcion de las tecnologias de la informacion y la comunicacion (TIC) empezo a proliferar a mediados de la decada de 1990. La creacion de los primeros navegadores graficos--Mosaic y Netscape Navigator--asi como, especialmente, la comercializacion de Internet hicieron posible para el publico en general la apropiacion de tecnologias y herramientas que cambiarian sus vidas. Aunque relegado a un segundo plano, otro factor que alteraria la vida de las personas fue la implementacion, en 1995, de la red GSM, la primera red digital para comunicaciones moviles que permitio que los telefonos celulares mandasen SMS, faxes y, en general, datos sin cables.

El diferente despliegue de infraestructuras de comunicaciones alrededor del globo desde la Revolucion Industrial, a la vez que una mayor asequibilidad de dispositivos y servicios, ha comportado que las sendas de adopcion de Internet y de la telefonia movil hayan discurrido por caminos paralelos. Las suscripciones de banda ancha fija eran 5,6 veces mayores en los paises de rentas altas que en los de rentas bajas, creciendo estos ultimos a tasas muy bajas. Sin embargo, la diferencia entre las suscripciones a telefonia movil era "solamente" 1,6 veces mayor en los paises mas ricos, y la tendencia indica, ademas, que la distancia se va acortando (ITU, 2011), aunque la banda ancha movil sigue el mismo camino que la banda ancha fija.

Las declaraciones que describen el potencial de la telefonia movil para el desarrollo--o "M4D" en la jerga, de sus siglas en ingles "mobiles for development"--han ido desde las apenas optimistas hasta prometer el fin de la pobreza en todo el globo. Comunicaciones, articulos, y hasta toda una serie de conferencias--Karlstad (Suecia), 2008; Kampala (Uganda), 2012; Dehli (India), 2012--se han dedicado a la cuestion. (2) Es en este marco que Comunicacion Movil yDesarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina aparece para aportar un analisis concienzudo y bien estructurado sobre los telefonos moviles para el desarrollo, de la teoria a la practica, del analisis cuantitativo agregado a los estudios de caso cualitativos.

No es casualidad que esta obra comparta dos autores con un libro anterior, Comunicacion Movil ySociedad, de Castells, Fernandez-Ardevol, Linchuan Qiu y Sey (2006). En el capitulo 8 de esa obra, titulado "Comunicacion inalambrica y desarrollo global: nuevas cuestiones, nuevas estrategias," los autores revisaban brevemente el impacto que los telefonos moviles estaban ya teniendo en las vidas de los mas pobres. Es asi que ambas obras pueden verse como un conjunto: La primera (2006) presenta una aproximacion general a la adopcion e impacto de las comunicaciones moviles (sobre todo desde un punto de vista sociologico) y la segunda (2011) continua la idea central del primero, pero enmarcado en America Latina y con su enfoque en el desarrollo.

Comunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina empieza con tres poderosas afirmaciones: (1) La clave de las comunicaciones moviles no es la movilidad, sino la conexion permanente; (2) esta conexion permanente permite la omnipresencia de las redes en todos los aspectos de la vida; y (3) la omnipresencia del acceso a la informacion y las comunicaciones normalmente comporta autonomia y empoderamiento. Mas alla de la salud (la necesidad humana mas basica), todas las demas, de la educacion a la gobernanza, pueden interpretarse en terminos de informacion y comunicacion.

Los tres primeros capitulos aportan una amplia explicacion a estas cuestiones, apoyandose firmemente en datos de distintas fuentes. Estos capitulos ofrecen pruebas de corte cuantitativo sobre el impacto de los telefonos moviles en los medios de subsistencia y la economia, mas alla del ambito de otras (valiosas) obras como la de Wicander (2010) M4D Overview 1.0: The 2009 Introduction to Mobile for Development, que deliberadamente se limita a la revision de la principal literatura sobre el tema.

Lo que los autores consiguen probar, estadisticamente, y con resultados significativos, es que los telefonos moviles tienen un impacto positivo en el crecimiento economico. Este impacto esta fuertemente relacionado con la eficiencia de los mercados debida a un mayor (y mejor) acceso y gestion de la informacion. Otros, como Donner y Escobari (2010), ya habian sugerido este impacto, y es tambien la semilla del interesante marco de investigacion de Duncombe (2012).

Mas importante incluso que la relacion de causalidad entre telefonia movil y crecimiento economico es como funciona. Los autores no encuentran el habitual impacto directo en la economia, sino el resultado de efectos de red (Torrent-Sellens, 2009).

De esta forma, cuanto mas establecida esta la red, menores seran los efectos de los telefonos moviles en el crecimiento economico. Cuanto mas pobre sea un pais, mas alto el impacto de los telefonos moviles en el crecimiento economico. Y a medida que la economia de un pais se torna mas sana y rica, los telefonos moviles jugaran un menor papel, arrojando rendimientos crecientes pero decrecientes en terminos marginales.

Los efectos de red sobre la desigualdad son inesperados: No presentan ningun efecto ni en la reduccion ni en el incremento de la desigualdad. Las tasas de adopcion de la telefonia movil son ya muy altas en la region, con una cobertura media del 90%. Practicamente todos los estratos de la sociedad tienen acceso a la telefonia movil; de esta forma, no hay una diferencia significativa debida a la posibilidad de acceder a las infraestructuras moviles. Asi, mientras los telefonos moviles si reducen la pobreza, se trata de un movimiento en bloque de toda la economia, manteniendose las relaciones internas de poder asi como las desigualdades existentes.

Parte de este desplazamiento hacia arriba de la economia en bloque puede verse tambien en el impacto en la ocupacion. Los telefonos moviles hacen posible mayores grados de desintermediacion en el mercado de trabajo, asi como la oportunidad de moverse mas libremente dentro de las rigidas estructuras del mismo. El acceso a mas y mejor informacion hace posible que los trabajadores autonomos consigan trabajos o identifiquen donde hay mas demanda de trabajadores.

Los autores tambien ponen enfasis en el hecho de que esta autonomia no solamente se da en el plano economico: fuera de la economia, la autonomia se traduce en mayor seguridad o mayor percepcion de seguridad, dado que las comunicaciones a distancia contribuyen a reducir la exposicion a distintos tipos de violencia y peligros.

El incremento de autonomia no deberia confundirse con un incremento de los niveles de aislamiento de ciudadanos y empresas. Como los autores explican, relacionado con la creacion de redes y sus efectos en la economia, la autonomia se acompana de lazos mas estrechos con los demas, tanto en el plano personal como en el profesional. La conectividad entre personas se incrementa, asi como el sentimiento de comunidad y de una identidad compartida.

Este sentido de conectividad lleva a los autores a afirmar que su "investigacion confirma que en America Latina la comunicacion se organiza en torno al telefono movil, al presentarse este como alternativa a servicios que nunca han alcanzado a masificarse en la region" (p. 323). A pesar de las barreras asociadas a la asequibilidad de servicios y dispositivos, las personas en America Latina han sido creativas en la adopcion de la nueva tecnologia--debido a la falta de muchas restricciones--y la utilizan en formas que serian impensables en paises mas ricos.

Los capitulos 4,5y6deComunicacion Movil y Desarrollo Economico y Social en America Latina proporcionan analisis de casos que contribuyen a anadir contexto y experiencias de la vida real a lo que los frios y crudos datos revelan en la hoja de calculo. Es en estos capitulos donde el lector puede encontrar la respuesta a la pregunta del millon: ?Por que gastaria nadie una relativamente alta proporcion de sus ingresos en comunicaciones en lugar de comida? La respuesta sencilla, aunque parezca obvia, es raramente abordada por la literatura academica de una forma tan directa--porque vale la pena. Los casos analizados presentan entrevistas personales asi como datos agregados de cuan importantes son los telefonos moviles para la socializacion, la empleabilidad y la inclusion en general.

De hecho, hay una cuestion implicita en los casos donde las comunicaciones no se consideran un vector de inclusion, sino de no exclusion. Aunque los resultados puedan acabar siendo parecidos al final--las comunicaciones van asociadas a la inclusion--los puntos de partida son totalmente diferentes, y considerar el telefono movil como una forma de luchar contra la exclusion es mas coherente con lo que nos dicen los datos sobre la no reduccion de la desigualdad. Los hechos refuerzan la hipotesis que los telefonos moviles son cada vez mas una tecnologia de utilidad general, que son a menudo mas faciles de identificar no por sus impactos positivos, sino por el impacto negativo debido a la no adopcion de dicha tecnologia.

El capitulo 7, aunque trata de cultura juvenil y telefonia movil, puede interpretarse de una forma totalmente distinta--como las instituciones en general, y en particular el sistema educativo, se estan quedando atras en la evolucion de la tecnologia. El analisis de la cultura juvenil y su relacion con los telefonos moviles describe perfectamente como los educadores y los tomadores de decisiones deberian repensar completamente sus estrategias de ensenanza, y aprovechar el potencial de la tecnologia movil y el acceso al conocimiento movil (lease aqui "ubicuo"). Las transcripciones de algunas entrevistas que los autores realizaron a algunos jovenes no hablan tanto de una brecha digital entre distintas generaciones, sino de una pura "brecha de mentalidad."

Esta brecha de mentalidad no pertenece a la discusion habitual sobre genero. La obra nos muestra como la llamada brecha de genero (que las mujeres son menos propensas a ser tecnologicamente competentes) es en realidad el resultado de otras diferencias mas basicas del mundo offline. Cuando las mujeres tienen la oportunidad de utilizar las TIC en su propio beneficio--como el caso de las mujeres peruanas en los mercados rurales--no solamente lo hacen con entusiasmo sino que los telefonos moviles refuerzan su ya importante papel en sus economias locales. Hilbert (2011) tambien demuestra esta cuestion para la misma region; seria logico que la futura literatura cientifica empiece a tener este aspecto en cuenta.

Hay dos cuestiones que algunos lectores esperarian ver tratadas en mayor detalle--la hipotesis del knowledge gap y la hipotesis del leapfrog (o saltos de etapas). No es que estos temas no esten constantemente presentes en la obra, pero una mencion explicita seria de agradecer.

Respecto de la hipotesis del knowledge gap (Tichenor, Donohue, & Olien, 1970), el libro confirma tacitamente los hallazgos de otros (Schradie, 2011; Warschauer & Matuchniak, 2010; Yang & Zhiyong Lan, 2010): la adopcion de tecnologia no afecta la desigualdad, pero la desigualdad social si afecta una adopcion desigual de la tecnologia. Asi, incluso ante ratios de penetracion muy altos, quienes se encuentran en los estratos mas pobres de la sociedad no acceden a la telefonia movil o la banda ancha. Hasta en los casos donde hay una adopcion general, las desigualdades socioeconomicas se replican como desigualdades en la adopcion de los moviles o desigualdades en las comunicaciones, especialmente a nivel de uso (es decir, el para que y el como).

La hipotesis del leapfrog es tratada directamente por Castells et al. (2006) en el capitulo 8 de Comunicacion movil y sociedad cuando "no existe suficiente informacion como para sustentar la hipotesis de los saltos de etapas, es decir, la eliminacion de los estadios hacia el desarrollo economico" (p. 332)--solamente pruebas de que la distancia entre ricos y pobres se esta cerrando. Asi, las "observaciones documentan el excesivo optimismo que rodea a esta nueva panacea del desarrollo" (p. 374). Esta falta de pruebas para apoyar la hipotesis del salto de etapas ha sido ya identificada (Howard, 2007; Pena-Lopez, 2009; Wang, Wei, & Wong, 2010) y es de nuevo refutada por Comunicacion movil y desarrollo economico y social en America Latina. Aunque hubiese sido deseable encontrar una declaracion mas explicita.

De hecho, esta es problablemente la principal fortaleza y debilidad del libro--su aproximacion estrictamente neutral, objetiva y academica al tema de los moviles para el desarrollo. La aproximacion es una fortaleza en el sentido de que el trabajo es rico en datos, afirmaciones bien medidas y ejemplos detallados que proporcionan al lector suficiente informacion para que este saque sus propias conclusiones. Pero, por otra parte, la obra mantiene una distancia de seguridad al no entrar en dar consejos explicitos a los disenadores de politicas, incluso cuando hay muchas conclusiones que estan indudablemente dirigidas a ellos. Cabria haber esperado una ultima parte--o capitulo--que las autoridades pudiesen utilizar como referencia facil y comprensible que poder grapar en sus paredes. Aportar solidos consejos de politica no deberia estar renido con el rigor academico.

Bibliografia

Castells, M., Fernandez-Ardevol, M., Linchuan Qiu, J., & Sey, A. (2006). Comunicacion movil ysociedad: una perspectiva global. Barcelona: Ariel, Fundacion Telefonica.

Donner, J. (2008). Research approaches to mobile use in the developing world: A review of the literature. Abingdon, VA: Taylor & Francis.

Donner, J., & Escobari, M. X. (2010). A review of evidence on mobile use by micro and small enterprises in developing countries. Journal of International Development, 22(5), 641-658.

Duncombe, R. (2012). Understanding mobile phone impact on livelihoods in developing countries: A new research framework. (Development Informatics Working Paper Series, No.48/2012.) Manchester, UK: Institute for Development Policy and Management. Disponible en http://www.sed .manchester.ac.uk/idpm/research/publications/wp/ di/di_wp48.htm

Fernandez-Ardevol, M., & Ros, A. (2009). Communication Technologies in Latin America and Africa: A multidisciplinary perspective. Barcelona, Spain: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.

Fernandez-Ardevol, M., Galperin, H., & Castells, M. (Dirs.). (2011). Comunicacion movil y desarrollo economico y social en America Latina. Barcelona, Spain: Ariel, Fundacion Telefonica.

Hilbert, M. R. (2011). Digital gender divide or technologically empowered women in developing countries? A typical case of lies, damned lies, and statistics. Women's Studies International Forum, 34(6), 479-489.

Howard, P. N. (2007). Testing the leap-frog hypothesis. The impact of existing infrastructure and telecommunications policy on the global digital divide. Information, Communication & Society, 10(2), 133-157.

International Telecommunication Union. (2011). Measuring the information society 2011. Geneva, Switzerland: ITU. Disponible en http:// www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/publications/idi/2011/ Material/MIS_2011_without_annex_5.pdf

Pena-Lopez, I. (2009). Measuring digital development for policy-making: Models, stages, characteristics and causes. Barcelona, Spain: ICTlogy. Disponible en http://phd.ictlogy.net

Schradie, J. (2011). The digital production gap: The digital divide and Web 2.0 collide. Poetics, 39(2), 145-168.

Tichenor, P. J., Donohue, G. A., & Olien, C. N. (1970). Mass media flow and differential growth in knowledge. Public Opinion Quarterly, 34(2), 159-170.

Torrent-Sellens, J. (2009). Conocimiento, redes y actividad economica: Un analisis de los efectos de red en la economia del conocimiento. UOC Papers, 8. Barcelona: UOC. Disponible en http:// www.uoc.edu/uocpapers/8/dt/esp/torrent.pdf

Wang, Z., Wei, S., & Wong, A. (2010). Does a leapfrogging growth strategy raise growth rate? Some international evidence. (NBER Working Paper No. 16390.) Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

Warschauer, M., & Matuchniak, T. (2010). New technology and digital worlds: Analyzing evidence of equity in access, use, and outcomes. Review of Research in Education, 34(1), 179-225.

Wicander, G. (2010). M4D Overview 1.0: the 2009 introduction to mobile for development. Karlstad, Sweden: Karlstad University. Disponible en http:// kau.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:320676/ FULLTEXT02

Yang, L., & Zhiyong Lan, G. (2010). Internet's impact on expert-citizen interactions in public policymaking--A meta analysis. Government Information Quarterly, 27(4), 431-441.

Ismael Pena-Lopez

ismael@ictlogy.net

Investigador

Sociedad de la Informacion & ICT4D

Internet Interdisciplinary Institute

Profesor, Derecho y Ciencia Politica

Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

(1.) Nota del editor: El co-director del ITID Francois Bar y el editor invitado Hernan Galperin han declinado participar en el proceso editorial de esta resena dado que son coautores del libro.

(2.) Para una breve puesta al dia, recomendamos al lector la consulta de Donner (2008) yFernandez-Ardevol yRos (2009).
COPYRIGHT 2012 University of Southern California, Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, Annenberg Press
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2012 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:Pena-Lopez, Ismael
Publication:Information Technologies & International Development
Article Type:Book review
Date:Dec 22, 2012
Words:5031
Previous Article:Toward a conceptual framework for ICT for development: lessons learned from the Latin American "cube framework"/ Hacia un marco conceptual para las...
Next Article:From the editors.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |