Printer Friendly

Medical biotechnology and Alzheimer's disease: new hopes.

Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia worldwide, is an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive impairment and functional disability (1-3). Devastating nature of AD leads to serious social and economic impacts on the healthcare systems which implies the necessity of its proper management (1-3). It has been demonstrated that patients' quality of life and their overall prognosis has a significant negative correlation with the severity of AD. Patients with severe AD need full-time care and assistance with some basic activities of daily living such as feeding and dressing in addition to severe deterioration in various domains of their cognitive functioning. Progress to a cure for AD has been hampered by the lack of information about the biology of the disease. The therapies currently approved for Alzheimer's disease work by treating the patients' symptoms, improving their cognitive and overall functions (4-8). Increasingly, however, experts are intent on slowing or halting the disease process, before it has ravaged patients' brains. A lot of data is being generated on changes in imaging biomarkers before patients really become clinically significantly impaired. For example, there has been a lot of great work done in identifying patients early based on these biomarkers. The current therapeutic market is valued at $3 to $4 billion, shared among drugs that temporarily delay disease progression or address the symptoms but do not alter the underlying disease. Currently, medical biotechnology has brought new hopes in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. For example one of the ongoing trials is related to bapineuzumab. Bapineuzumab is a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to target and clear [beta]-amyloid. This vaccine is the first new drug aimed at slowing or even halting AD progression.

References

(1.) Akhondzadeh S. Hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognition. J Clin Pharm Ther 1999;24(4):241-248.

(2.) Akhondzadeh S, Noroozian M. Alzheimer's disease: pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy. [Drugs 2002;5(11): 1062-1069.

(3.) Akhondzadeh S, Abbasi SH. Herbal medicine in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen 2006;21 (2): 113-118.

(4.) Akhondzadeh S, Noroozian M, Mohammadi M, Ohadinia S, Jamshidi AH, Khani M. Salvia officinalis extract in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a double blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial. J Clin Pharm Ther 2003 ;28(l):53-59.

(5.) Akhondzadeh S, Noroozian M, Mohammadi M, Ohadinia S, Jamshidi AH, Khani M. Melissa officinalis extract in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2003;74(7):863-866.

(6.) Akhondzadeh S, Shafiee Sabet M, Harirchian MH, Togha M, Cheraghmakani H, Razeghi S, et al. A 22-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of Crocus sativus in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2010;207(4):637-643.

(7.) Akhondzadeh S, Sabet MS, Harirchian MH, Togha M, Cheraghmakani H, Razeghi S, et al. Saffron in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a 16-week, randomized and placebo-controlled trial. J Clin Pharm Ther 2010;35(5):581-588.

(8.) Farokhnia M, Shafiee Sabet M, Iranpour N, Gougol A, Yekehtaz H, Alimardani R, et al. Comparing the efficacy and safety of Crocus sativus L. with memantine in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease: a double-blind randomized clinical trial. Hum Psychopharmacol 2014;29(4) :351-359.

Shahin Akhondzadeh, Ph.D., FBPharmacols

Editor in Chief
COPYRIGHT 2016 Avicenna Research Institute
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2016 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:Akhondzadeh, Shahin
Publication:Avicenna Journal of Medical Biotechnology (AJMB)
Article Type:Editorial
Date:Apr 1, 2016
Words:553
Previous Article:Outer membrane protein C (ompC) gene as the target for diagnosis of Salmonella species isolated from human and animal sources.
Next Article:Role of superoxide dismutase 2 gene ala16Val polymorphism and total antioxidant capacity in diabetes and its complications.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters