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Making a DOS shell program look like a Windows application.

Norton Utilities is one of the handiest utilities for computer users. It includes an array of tools - from file management and virus detection to diagnostic-repair functions and disk optimizing. Now Norton has introduced a version of the program for DOS users that has a Windows-type design, replete with icons representing software functions that can be activated by clicking a mouse.

The program features drop-down menus and dialog boxes so users don't have to remember complex DOS keystrokes to evoke functions. To make launching application programs convenient, Norton Desktop can be customized so a mouse click opens a spreadsheet or a word processor, for example.

Norton Desktop costs $179 and is available at most software retailers.

For more information, write to Symantec Corp., 10201 Torre Avenue, Cupertino, California 95014, or call (800) 411-7234.
COPYRIGHT 1993 American Institute of CPA's
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Publication:Journal of Accountancy
Article Type:Brief Article
Date:May 1, 1993
Words:132
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