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Make Tuning Adjustments One at a Time.

SHOOTING TIP With RANDY ULMER

TUNING A NEW BOW can be frustrating. You have a plethora of variables: arrow spine, arrow length, arrow point weight, draw weight, draw length, nock point position, arrow rest vertical position, arrow rest horizontal position, arrow rest spring tension, nock rotation, nock point position, etc. You get the picture. And that's just the equipment, before you throw in the most variable variable -- you.

It's no wonder bowhunters feel frustrated. I've watched many a grown man nearly reduced to tears by the process of tuning his bow. I've noticed one similarity in most of these frustrated people. When tuning their bows, they consistently changed several variables at once, leaving them unsure what change had what effect.

Let me use an example: when paper tuning a bow with a nock-high-left tear, most archers would try to correct it all at once by making several changes, like raising their nocking point, moving the arrow rest laterally, and changing the spring tension of the arrow rest.

A more reliable method would be to separate the tear into its vertical and horizontal components and then work on correcting one component at a time, by making one change at a time. My suggestion would be to try to correct the vertical component of the tear first. I would do this by adjusting one thing at a time, starting with the most simple - the nocking point. If moving the nocking point doesn't do the trick, I would try adjusting the rest's vertical spring tension (if it's adjustable). If still unsuccessful, I would try adjusting the bow's cam timing.

Once the vertical component of the tear has been corrected, I would focus on the horizontal component of the tear. By changing one variable at a time, you can see, without a doubt, what effect the change had on the tune, without muddying the water with other changes to other variables.

By making changes one at a time you'll move quickly and confidently towards your goal, which is a perfectly tuned bow.
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Publication:Bowhunter
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Feb 1, 2000
Words:338
Previous Article:Keeping On.
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