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MUSICAL BONDING SAUGUS HIGH CLUB IS HARMONIZING ON PRODUCTION OF CD.

Byline: Carol Rock Staff Writer

SAUGUS - English teacher Frank Koroshec spends his free time advising students with an ear for music.

On Tuesday, he listed a series of committees on the white board - ``Food'' ``Tickets'' ``CD Sales'' ``Stage Crew.'' His advice? Sign up for the team and help everyone else succeed.

His audience was a gathering of DIA - Developing Independent Artists - a club for students interested in music that was started last year at Saugus High School by Koroshec and fellow instructor Tammy Kornfeld. The club will host its second annual concert March 3 in the school's outdoor amphitheater.

Featured bands include Amarinth in Agony, This Dying Breed, Mic City Sons, Household Discards, Chugga Chugga Nee, Fentruck, The Uprising, Oceans for Urchins and Bringing Back Valentine.

``If you're playing in a band, you're only playing for a half-hour,'' Koroshec told the students perched on desks in his classroom. ``You have plenty of time to work one of these booths. And plan on staying until 10 p.m. to help with cleanup. If everybody helps, we'll be out of there by 9:15.''

``In DIA, you see a side of kids you don't see in class,'' said Kornfeld, who has since transferred to West Ranch High, where she has started another DIA club. ``Kids who normally wouldn't be friends are helping each other record songs or design CD artwork.''

Kornfeld's students have chosen to work on a compilation CD of their favorite music. She is teaching them the ropes of copyright, making them contact the groups for permission before adding their music to the CD.

``We're encouraging them to use local bands,'' she said. ``Obviously if they pick U2 or the Rolling Stones, they might not hear back.''

To Koroshec, DIA is a way to give students hands-on experience without worrying about grades. Club members include musicians as well as students with other talents essential to the big picture - management, money handling, promotion, video, marketing and creative types that make DIA merchandise.

Natalia Sookias, 16, and Brie Pearlman, 15, showed off a pile of iPod ``beanies'' - crocheted holders for the popular music players they are selling at fundraisers.

``This came from our own hobbies,'' said Pearlman, who plays guitar and is learning the harmonica. ``I learned to crochet at church camp.''

``Then we all joined together,'' Sookias said, chiming in. ``We have beanie hats and backpacks too.''

The girls have been selling both kinds of beanies to a few students, but hope to do better at the merchandise booth at the concert, where they will have forms for custom orders.

A rainbow of T-shirts was posted on the back wall of the classroom, imprinted with a simple logo ``iDIA'' - the brainchild of junior Lynne Cook, 16.

``We made 100 shirts and we've sold about seven,'' she said.

``Ten,'' corrected Koroshec, holding out money collected from a recent sale. ``We really haven't pushed them yet; we're planning on doing that next week.''

``I like it because I'm interested in the whole arts spectrum,'' Cook said. ``It's an art club, but it's not just about sketching or painting.''

Andria Crescioni, 17, and Ashley Fye, 17, made customized vintage shirts last year to help raise money for the club's CD. They bought shirts from secondhand stores and embroidered ``DIA'' on the pockets, selling them to interested students for $5 to $10.

The group's goal is to raise $2,500, which would cover the mastering costs, which will be done at Capitol Records. That amount would also allow musicians to include video clips from their performances.

Koroshec said the 2006 CD will be a little less edgy than last year's to reflect changing musical tastes and to reach a broader spectrum of the listening public. He's also seen an attitude shift from school administrators, who were initially cautious, but are now wholehearted groupies.

``Last year, they were a little nervous,'' he said. ``Now they're definitely supportive. They see the departments working together and the teachers helping out and they're completely behind us.''

The concert, which will take place on two outdoor stages in the school quad, will start at 4:30 p.m. and end by 9 p.m. Tickets are $7 per person or $10 with a CD.

Carol Rock, (661) 257-5252

carol.rock(at)dailynews.com

CAPTION(S):

3 photos

Photo:

(1 -- color) Richard Fitzwater, 17, adds to the T-shirt display for the Developing Independent Artists club at Saugus High School.

(2 -- color) Brie Pearlman, 15, knits an iPod ``beanie'' that will be sold by the DIA club for $10.

(3) A selection of the iPod ``beanies'' are displayed.

David Crane/Staff Photographer
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Feb 22, 2006
Words:770
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