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MOTOROLA ADDS NEW HIGH-PERFORMANCE, LOW-COST MICROPROCESSORS TO 68000 FAMILY; AND UNVEILS 3.3-VOLT INTEGRATED MICROPROCESSOR

     MOTOROLA ADDS NEW HIGH-PERFORMANCE, LOW-COST MICROPROCESSORS
    TO 68000 FAMILY; AND UNVEILS 3.3-VOLT INTEGRATED MICROPROCESSOR
    AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The Microprocessor and Memory Technologies Group of Motorola, Inc. (NYSE: MOT) today introduced the 68LC040, a new low-cost version of the 68040 microprocessor.  In addition, Motorola announced first silicon of both the 68LC040 and the 68EC040, and the availability of samples in the fourth quarter.  The 68LC040 is intended to power high-performance personal computers and operating system-based embedded-control designs.  The 68EC040, unveiled in April of this year, is targeted at high-performance embedded-control applications.
    Also, the group introduced a low-voltage version of the 68340 integrated processor with DMA (direct memory access) suitable for powering handheld and battery-powered equipment, such as computers, instruments, data-entry and communications terminals, games, weapons guidance systems, CD-ROM and CD-I systems.  And finally, the company lowered the price of the year-old 5-volt 68340 microprocessor.
    "The new products demonstrate Motorola's commitment to provide system designers with the widest choice of compatible computing engines in the industry," said Jim Reinhart, manager, M68000 family marketing and applications.  "As markets for all types of microprocessor-based products become more competitive, price/performance and time-to-market have become major factors in making a CPU choice.  These product options expand OEM's design options for speed, functionality and cost, while retaining compatibility with their existing 68000-family code," he added.
    Motorola optimized the 68LC040 for low-cost personal computer and embedded control applications by streamlining the 68040 microprocessor of non-essential features.  The new 68LC040 retains the 68040's pipelined integer-processing unit, Harvard architecture, dual 4-Kbyte caches, separate instruction and data memory-management units (MMUs). The floating-point processing unit has been removed and new low-power buffers added, preserving the 68040's high integer performance while enabling significant reduction in production costs.  Without the extra circuits, the 25-MHz 68LC040 still executes 22 MIPS (million instructions per second), yet is priced at only $185 each.
    The 68LC040 is targeted for price-sensitive personal computers and operating system-dependent embedded-control applications.  Examples of these applications include high-end network devices such as routers and concentrators, telecommunication switches and cellular network systems.
    The 68EC040 also retains the 68040's pipelined integer-processing unit, Harvard architecture, dual 4-Kbyte caches and also adds the 68LC040's low-power buffers.  Its streamlined design excludes the 68040's floating point unit and the MMUs of the 68040 and 68LC040. Consequently, the 68EC040 is less expensive to manufacture.  The result is a device that can match the 68040's high integer performance, yet is aggressively priced for the cost-sensitive embedded control market.
    Delivering 22 MIPs at 25-MHz for $104, the 68EC040 provides an attractive solution for new embedded-control applications and a migration path for existing designs.  It is targeted at graphic- intensive laser printers and scanners, video special effects systems, X-terminals, robotics, industrial controller systems, and other processing-intensive embedded applications.
    The 20-MHz and 25-MHz versions of the 68LC040 are priced at $158 and $185, respectively.  The 20-MHz and 25-MHz versions of the 68EC040 are priced at $90 and $104 each.  The parts are priced in quantities of 10,000.  Both the 68LC040 and 68EC040 will be in volume production during the first quarter of 1992.
    The 3.3-volt 68340V provides object-code compatibility with other 68000 family members, which will appeal to OEMs seeking to design 68000-powered products quickly. The 3.3-volt 68340V is identical to the original 5-volt 68340 except for the electrical specifications. Both devices are fabricated using the same masks.  The new 68340V dissipates just 140 milliwatts (mW) from a power supply of 3.3 volts, when clocked at 8.3 MHz.  By contrast, the 5-volt 68340 dissipates 650 mW when clocked at 16.78 MHz.  In standby mode, both chips consume less than half a milliwatt.  All inputs and outputs are still rated at standard TTL levels, up to the supply voltage.  Both 68340's feature additional power management enhancements such as the Low Power STOP instruction, which shuts power down to idle peripherals, and implementat ion in low-power HCMOS.  (Motorola also has hundreds of 3.3-volt CMOS an d BiCMOS logic and interface circuits which mate well with the 68340V.)
    Fabricated in 1-micron HCMOS, Motorola's low-power, high-performance process technology, the 68340V is packaged in 144-pin ceramic quad flat packs for surface-mounting in small portable devices, and 145-pin plastic pin-grid arrays.  Development support for the 68340 is available in the form of a $500 evaluation board from Motorola (M68340EVS), and real-time emulators, real-time operating systems, logic analyzers and compilers from many third-party hardware and software vendors.
    The 3.3-volt 68340V is available now in limited quantities, with production quantities available in the second quarter of 1992.  Samples of the 3.3-volt 68340V are priced at $30.60.  Where standard power supplies are still acceptable, the 5-volt 68340 remains an optimal solution -- and is now available at a lower price.  The 5-volt 68340 now costs $22.20 each in quantities of 10,000 -- a 35 percent reduction of the price announced in September 1990.
    Motorola is one of the world's leading providers of electronic equipment, systems, components and services for worldwide markets. Products include two-way radios, pagers, cellular telephone systems, semiconductors, defense and aerospace electronics, automotive and industrial electronic equipment, computers, data communications and information processing and handling equipment.  Motorola was a winner of the U.S. Department of Commerce's first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, in recognition of its superior company-wide quality management process.
    -0-                      11/4/91
    /CONTACT: Kristen Hausman or Tom Starnes of Motorola, Inc., 512-891-2386 or 512-891-2125; or Patty Kachmer of Cunningham Communication, Inc., 617-494-8202, for Motorola/
    (MOT) CO:  Motorola, Inc. ST:  Texas IN:  CPR SU:  PDT DD -- NE001 -- 0583 11/04/91 09:04 EST
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Date:Nov 4, 1991
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