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MINORITY COMPANIES GET THE BUSINESS

 MCLEAN, Va., July 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Two hundred minority business people got the chance to cut through red tape in search of high-tech contracts today.
 They met directly with technical managers from SAIC (Science Applications International Corp.) at the Washington, D.C. area's first Small Disadvantaged Business Day. The program was designed to foster joint opportunities between the small companies and SAIC, a large high- technology corporation.
 "A lot of companies want to wait until you get a contract to take you on as a sub," said Lurita Doan, president of New Management Computer Specialists of Fairfax County. "This is really one great opportunity to meet people who might throw some business my way."
 Fred Sawyer, president and chief executive officer of FHS, ran back and forth between sessions.
 "I think these guys are serious," said the owner of a three-year-old systems engineering and technical services company.
 The keynote speaker for the event was Henry Wilfong, chairman of NASA's Minority Business Resource Advisory Committee and president of the National Association of Small and Disadvantaged Business.
 "What we're going to do here is massage the system," he said.
 Wilfong's remarks were followed by presentations from SAIC technical managers about their business areas, then a reception for some one-on- one dealing.
 "We decided to sponsor this event because it's good business," said SAIC Small Business Officer Tony Vigo. "The businesses represented today offer services and products that can develop mutually beneficial teaming opportunities."
 The agenda was modeled on last year's successful Small Business Day held by SAIC in Dayton, Ohio. That event resulted in potential business partnerships for the 40 local small businesses that attended.
 The U.S. government definition of "small business" varies according to the type of business conducted, but generally means less than 500 employees in manufacturing, or not more than $5 million to $24 million in annual revenue for various service industries. A "small disadvantaged business" is one that is at least 51 percent owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals.
 With more than 3,500 employees in the national capital area, SAIC provides services and products to government and the private sector. SAIC business areas include national security, health care, energy, environment and systems integration. With annual revenues of $1.5 billion, the company has a total of 15,000 employees in more than 250 locations worldwide.
 -0- 7/29/93
 /CONTACT: Sue Volek of SAIC, 619-535-7286/


CO: Science Applications International Corp. ST: Virginia IN: SU:

JB-MF -- SD006 -- 7454 07/29/93 17:08 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jul 29, 1993
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