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METHANE GAS FROM LANDFILL USED TO HEAT AT&T PLANT

 METHANE GAS FROM LANDFILL USED TO HEAT AT&T PLANT
 COLUMBUS, Ohio, June 25 /PRNewswire/ -- For the next 30 or so years,


AT&T (NYSE: T) will rely on methane gas from a local landfill to heat its two-million-square-foot manufacturing facility here.
 Methane -- a naturally occurring by-product of landfills -- is produced as materials decompose. Untapped, it migrates into the atmosphere. Methane gas has been cited as a contributing factor to global warming.
 The methane gas -- enough to heat 2,000 homes for a year -- travels through a 1.5-mile pipeline from a now-closed landfill in Gahanna to AT&T's 50-acre facility, where it's used as boiler fuel. The company estimates it will save about $60,000 in fuel costs in the system's first year of operation. The supply from the Gahanna site is expected to last 30 years.
 "The positive environmental impact of this project will be enormous," said Bill Robinson, manufacturing vice president of AT&T's Columbus facility, which produces telephone switching systems, wireless telephone cell site equipment and network operations systems. "It will greatly reduce methane gas emissions at the landfill, thus mitigating the potential emissions at the landfill, thus mitigating the potential 'greenhouse effect' of that gas. It will save us energy costs, and it will contribute to AT&T's overall environmental program." It will also reduce consumption of a corresponding amount of non-renewable fossil fuel.
 AT&T worked with SBM Inc., a company that specializes in methane gas recovery projects, to install the system, which includes a special burner that can utilize methane.
 "SBM harnessed a waste product that otherwise would have been released into the atmosphere," said Steve Teets, an engineer at AT&T who headed the project. "Now, our primary burner can burn methane gas and natural gas in any combination, and the remaining boilers can burn natural gas or fuel oil. As we make our final adjustments, our intent is to burn as much methane as we can, and supplement with natural gas only as needed."
 The methane gas recovery industry started in the 1970s in California, in response to smog problems and the rapid escalation in energy prices and shortages. There are about 20 methane gas recovery projects in the United States that use the gas in boiler operations.
 "The AT&T installation is a very high quality system," said Jeff Blanton, executive vice president, SBM. "The new type of burner and controls provide both efficient combustion and convenience for the operators, and there are additional safety features installed in the system." A brick manufacturing company near the Columbus area landfill uses methane gas from the same landfill to power its kiln.
 AT&T's corporate wide environmental program includes reducing ozone- depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), eliminating toxic air emissions, and recycling. The company has reduced CFCs by 76 percent, cut reportable toxic air emissions by 74 percent, and recycles 45 percent of its waste paper.
 -0- 6/24/92
 /CONTACT: Barbara Baklarz, 908-204-8264, or home, 201-857-4397, or Ron Fisher, 614-860-5052, or home, 614-890-9029, both of AT&T/
 (T) CO: AT&T ST: Ohio, New Jersey IN: OIL SU:


PS -- NY004 -- 3665 06/25/92 10:00 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 25, 1992
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