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MARTIN MARIETTA UPPER STAGE TO LAUNCH PAYLOAD FROM SHUTTLE

 DENVER, July 14 /PRNewswire/ -- A Martin Marietta (NYSE: ML)-built Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) will boost NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) from Space Shuttle Discovery following its scheduled Saturday morning launch from Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
 This will be the second mission for the Denver-built TOS, and the first time it has flown on a space shuttle. The first TOS was used in September 1992 when it boosted NASA's Mars Observer on its way to the Red Planet after launch on a Titan III rocket. Martin Marietta builds the TOS for Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.
 Eight hours after the 7:22 a.m. MDT launch Saturday, ACTS/TOS will be gently nudged out of Discovery's payload bay. The satellite and TOS upper stage will coast for 45 minutes while the shuttle maneuvers to a safe distance, 11.7 miles away. Once the TOS has positioned the satellite in the proper attitude, the TOS solid rocket motor will fire for 110 seconds, accelerating to the 22,800-mph velocity necessary to boost the satellite into its orbit, 21,519 miles above the Earth. Later, thrusters and a solid rocket motor on the satellite will fire to position the satellite into its final orbit 22,300 high.
 The ACTS satellite boosted into orbit by the TOS will serve as an orbiting testbed that will demonstrate a variety of advanced satellite communications technology, which, according to NASA, will keep the United States competitive in the world marketplace into the next century.
 "We are proud to once again have a major role in a NASA mission, a heritage which goes back to NASA's Gemini, Viking and Voyager programs and continues today with Magellan and Mars Observer," James W. McAnally, president of Martin Marietta Astronautics, said.
 The shuttle mission will be the first combined mission for Martin Marietta's new Space Group which was formed following the merger with GE Aerospace this year. Besides Astronautics' role building the TOS, Martin Marietta Astro Space, East Windsor, N.J., built the ACTS satellite, and Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems, New Orleans, built the shuttle's External Tank.
 Martin Marietta Astronautics is one of three operating elements of Martin Marietta's Space Group headquartered in Bethesda, Md. Astronautics designs, develops, tests and manufactures a variety of advanced technology systems for space and defense. Chief products include space systems, space launch systems and ground systems.
 FACT SHEET
 TRANSFER ORBIT STAGE
 PROGRAM Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS)
 CUSTOMER Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC), McLean, Va;
 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
 (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center.
 CONTRACT VALUE $155 million, including flight activation,
 development and production contracts.
 COMPANY ROLE Martin Marietta and Orbital Sciences Corporation
 developed and built upper stages for commercial
 or government use to boost satellites from low-
 Earth orbits to higher orbits and planetary
 trajectories. Martin Marietta is under contract
 to OSC for the TOS design, development,
 manufacture, test and launch operations for
 NASA's Mars Observer (launched Sept. 25, 1992)
 and Advanced Communications Technology Satellite
 (ACTS). The Transfer Orbit Stage is built at
 Martin Marietta's Denver facility.
 CONTRACT STATUS In September 1986, NASA awarded OSC a contract
 to supply a TOS vehicle and related technical
 services for the Mars Observer mission. In
 January 1987, NASA contracted with OSC for a TOS
 to boost the Advanced Communications Technology
 Satellite into geosynchronous transfer orbit
 after launch by the Space Shuttle.
 PURPOSE The TOS is a medium-capacity upper stage
 designed to place 6,000- to 13,000-pound
 payloads into geosynchronous transfer orbit or
 fly spacecraft into deep space trajectories.
 DESCRIPTION The Transfer Orbit Stage weights 24,041 pounds
 (with its solid rocket motor) and is about
 10.8 ft. in length and 90.6 inches in diameter.
 TOS is an inertially guided, three-axis
 stabilized solid propellant single stage
 vehicle. To provide high performance, low
 technical risk and affordability, the TOS uses
 flight-proven hardware with selective
 application of current avionics technologies.
 It uses the flight-proven Orbis 21 SRM-1 solid
 rocket motor manufactured by United Technologies
 Corp.'s Chemical Systems Division; a laser
 inertial guidance system developed by Honeywell
 Inc.; and reaction control system rocket engine
 modules produced by UTC's Hamilton Standard
 Division.
 OPERATION The first TOS launched NASA's Mars Observer on
 Sept. 25, 1992. After separation from the Titan
 III launch vehicle, the Transfer Orbit Stage's
 solid rocket motor fired, sending the spacecraft
 into its planetary transfer trajectory. The TOS
 separated from the spacecraft after it boosted
 Mars Observer on its course to Mars.
 BACKGROUND The TOS was developed commercially as a low-cost
 alternative for government and commercial
 applications, with development costs paid by
 private enterprise. It was designed to fill the
 performance gap between the Payload Assist
 Module and Centaur upper stages. Its heritage
 includes components from other flight programs,
 including Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) built by
 Boeing. The TOS has been designed and qualified
 under the full technical oversight of NASA's
 Marshall Space Flight Center. Martin Marietta
 has extensive background and experience in upper
 stage integration, including building and
 integration of the Transtage on Titan III in the
 late 1960s. The company also integrated
 spacecraft on the Space Shuttle under a mission
 integration and support contract for several
 years, and has IUS and Centaur integration
 experience on Titan.
 STATUS The second TOS was shipped to NASA in March 1992
 for NASA's Advanced Communications Technology
 Satellite launch on the Space Shuttle Discovery
 (STS-51) in July 1993.
 -0- 7/14/93
 /CONTACT: Terry Monrad of Martin Marietta, 303-977-5364/
 (ML)


CO: Martin Marietta ST: Colorado IN: ARO SU:

MP-PS -- NY011 -- 1275 07/14/93 10:05 EDT
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Date:Jul 14, 1993
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