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MARKET INCENTIVES ENDORSED AS NEW TOOL FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION DURING CONFERENCE SPONSORED BY CAL/EPA AND CLAREMONT INSTITUTE

 LOS ANGELES, Jan. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- A two-day conference, sponsored by the California Environmental Protection Agency (CAL/EPA) and the Claremont Institute, endorsed using market-based incentives to prevent pollution, ranging from clean vehicle incentives and permitting reform to sensitizing public employees to customer service and restructuring fees.
 "The conference brought together an outstanding collection of business leaders, academicians, environmental groups and government officials, all working together to find innovative solutions to our growing environmental challenges," said James Strock, Cal/EPA secretary.
 "Market incentives are important because they empower people -- giving them more and better choices -- in how to produce products and services to meet our high environmental standards. They also obviously reduce the amount of middlemen and middlewomen involved in activities such as permitting, thereby reducing the cost and time it takes to issue permits," Strock said.
 The conference included several panels of business leaders, environmentalists and academicians dealing with a variety of topics ranging from environmental regulation, tradable permit systems, air quality and new technologies.
 In a luncheon speech, Strock told conference attendees that Gov. Pete Wilson's commitment to high environmental standards and increased economic growth were issues that could be resolved through the use of more market-based incentives systems, rather than command-and-control systems.
 Market-based systems use incentives such as pricing and regulatory reform to allow the market to decide how best to meet environmental standards.
 Command-and-control systems in contrast use regulatory and fee tools to establish goals and mandate achieving those goals.
 "Command-and-control systems, by their very nature, seldom allow for the kind of flexibility and responsiveness that today's business often demands. By providing market incentives, decisions affecting the environmental quality are necessarily achieved more quickly and efficiently ," said Larry P. Arnn, Claremont Institute president.
 Julie Meier Wright, trade and commerce secretary, also spoke to conference participants of the need to move towards market-based systems as a better method of ensuring environmental compliance as well as providing businesses more flexibility in their decision-making and planning.
 Participants concluded the conference by listing ideas for creating market incentives for areas of air and water quality, toxics, solid waste and pesticides.
 Programs for clean vehicles, transportation systems and new environmental technologies were highlighted and targeted for creation.
 Reform of cumbersome permitting processes was also urged as well as shifting more of the emphasis of environmental protection to pollution prevention rather than remediation -- stopping a problem before it becomes a problem.
 The conference was designed to scope out the overall concepts of market incentives and establish goals in achieving them. Cal/EPA will follow-up with a series of one-day workshops over the coming year to expand these concepts into more detailed proposals.
 The Claremont Institute, established in 1979, is a leading public policy research organization that has long studied environmental policy and alternative solutions.
 The private, non-profit institute, supports the Center for Land Use and Environmental Studies, as well as the Sacramento-based Golden State Center for Policy Studies.
 -0- 1/26/93
 /CONTACT: James Lee of Cal EPA, 916-324-9670; or Matt Spalding of the Claremont Institute, 909-621-6825/


CO: Callifornia Environmental Protection Agency; Claremont Institute ST: California IN: SU:

SG-GT -- SF004 -- 9208 01/26/93 15:31 EST
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Date:Jan 26, 1993
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