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Loom rooms with a view.

Loom rooms with a view

When you spend hours sitting in one spot, you want something diverting to look at. When you work with thousands of tiny threads, you want plenty of light and a simple system to help organize the potentially maddening minutiae. That's why the two weavers shown here commissioned architects to design loom rooms. Their solutions are remarkably similar.

Pictured above in the upper-story weaving room of her Manzanita, Oregon, beach house, designed by Portland architect Robert Oringdulph, is Rachael McConnell. Facing the Pacific coast, her two looms stand near a bank of shelves, where cones of thread and yarn stand upright, weaving books are ready for reference, and bins hold skeins grouped by color.

In the streamlined Portland studio at left, Vera Rockwood weaves her tapestries on a high warp loom, watching traffic on the Columbia River. She has space for a drawing board for working out patterns before threading the steel loom. Designed by architect David Rockwood, the room has floor-to-ceiling glass; it faces north, providing a soft, even light but no direct blast of sun.

In both rooms, the weavers wanted wall-to-wall carpet for warmth and comfort, but chose a low pile--a surface that has less clinging power--so a vacuum cleaner can pull up most of the snipped and fallen threads.

Photo: Facing a panoramic view, weaver begins work on jack loom. White walls reflect light, while lofty ceiling dispels confinement. Below, closet-deep shelves hold books and supplies; pull-out wire bins keep yarn and thread visible

Photo: Comfortable in office chair, she works beside a north-facing window wall. Stacking bins (right) hold her supplies
COPYRIGHT 1987 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1987 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sunset
Date:Nov 1, 1987
Words:270
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