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Letters in the Editor's Mailbag.

Byline: The Register-Guard

Give lawmakers the boot

Shame on Gov. Ted Kulongoski. Shame on Oregon legislators, and shame on all the politicians who continue to be uncreative and nonthinking. They continue to do what their predecessors have done since 1991: cut needed services and the people who deliver them.

It is obvious that the politicians of this state do not care about the safety of its people, as illustrated by the cuts to firefighters and to police officers. There is a continued lack of concern for the health and welfare of our elderly, poor and those least able to take care of themselves. Last, but not least, their tremendous inability to care about the children in this state has been demonstrated by the continued cuts and underfunding to all levels of education and child-care provider programs. They need to take a hard look at those cuts.

Not only have they systematically dismantled the professions that provide these services with their economic cuts, they have gone one step further by attacking the personal lives of these professionals through their pocketbooks. They want to freeze their wages, cut benefits and roll back their retirement plans. These cuts are no longer professional, they are personal.

The legislators say that all these economic cuts are necessary and that the Public Employees Retirement System needs to be changed. I say we need to change our legislators. It is time for public employees to stand together for ourselves and those being hurt by the state cuts.

CURTIS DUNHAM

Eugene

Holman is best qualified

I concur 100 percent with The Register-Guard's strong endorsement of Paul Holman (editorials, May 2) for the Position 1 seat on the Lane Community College Board. Holman was appointed to this position last year by unanimous vote of the LCC Board. He is the best qualified candidate for the job.

TOM HOYT

Eugene

Right punishes differing views

Well, it looks like the right wing is finally embracing political correctness.

They have been fighting limits on speech for years and have been all about being able to say whatever they want, whenever they want to. The right wing has been fighting against the do-gooders who want to do away with degrading labels and language championed by Rush Limbaugh, Michael Savage and others, but now things have changed.

The right is reinventing political correctness by punishing those with differing viewpoints (Tim Robbins, the Dixie Chicks and other dangerous elements) and becoming the elitist group they used to despise. They are the new PC cops.

TODD STOUT

Eugene

Religious left in a funk

After reading Mike Sterling's excellent piece (Register-Guard, April 27), I knew hatred and intolerance would spread through the local liberal community like a virus. The truth hurts - doesn't it, folks? Yeah, that's right, and denial is a river in Egypt.

It's not the war on terrorism that has the religious left in a funk, it's that conservatives are in control of our country. The libs hate that. They hate the moral values that are associated with conservatives. They hate that Sterling is a public school teacher and would rather have their daughters instructed by Bill Clinton.

Liberals scream about rich conservatives, while their presidential poster boy, Sen. John Kerry, banks more personal wealth than all Republican senators combined. They wail over the deaths of a hundred innocent civilians in Iraq and are silent about the genocide of 40 million innocent pre-born humans in America. They know that AIDS is a preventable disease like lung cancer but demand a cure rather than changing their lifestyles. They insist on forcing your children to be pro-homosexuality even if you teach them otherwise.

Well, now you know why "right radio" is so popular in America. I hope Sterling is free to express his opinions in his classroom, and I hope he continues to contribute his thoughts on this page.

DONALD P. RICHEY

Eugene

UO takes risk on SARS

The University of Oregon's apparent shock over University of California at Berkeley's actions in banning incoming students from some Asian countries for fear of SARS is interesting (Register-Guard, May 6). With a huge Asian enrollment, Berkeley can hardly be accused of anti-Asian bias, so the decision obviously reflects a genuine public health concern.

The UO's superior wisdom in dismissing the risk of a SARS outbreak on campus may prove to be an embarrassing misstep should the illness strike here. I only hope the UO is right and Berkeley wrong.

TONY MASSENGILL

Eugene

Most Bush policies failing

The ditto-heads have been well represented in Mailbag. You can recognize their letters by the absence of substantive arguments and the ubiquitous use of the term "liberal" to describe anyone whose opinions differ from their own. "Traitor" is usually thrown in for good measure for opponents of the president's policies.

Though I am not a liberal, I agree with the 10 Nobel prize winning economists who have deemed Bush's economic policies ruinous. I suspect his motives for invading Iraq were neither to bring freedom to Iraqis nor to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction. His actions have more to do with the tens of billions of dollars Bush will contract on a secret, non-competitive basis to campaign contributors.

Nearly all his initiatives have been failures. For example, while we are all looking toward Iraq, we are losing the war in Afghanistan where the Taliban has already regained control of the south.

Most of all, I will not vote for a president who would greatly diminish my civil liberties. For example, the Bush Justice Department is currently pushing the Patriot Act II, which provides for secret arrests (among other reductions of our freedoms).

My calling someone a ditto-head does not make him wrong, nor would my appealing to patriotism make me right. Fortunately, you can go on the Web and visit a variety of sources to reach your own conclusions based on evidence, not name calling. Remember, the price of liberty is eternal vigilance.

PAUL NICHOLSON

Eugene

Keep Iraq sanctions in place

I am appalled that the U.S. government is drafting a resolution to lift sanctions against Iraq. I do not support this and hope that others will not either.

We have lost over a hundred American lives in the conflict with Iraq so we could remove all the weapons of mass destruction and the threat to our security. Now, when we are in a position to freely scour the country and interrogate high level government officials about the locations of weapons, our government is foolishly moving to lift trade restrictions - making it easier for goods to flow into and out of the country.

The Iraqi people have shown a willingness to do whatever necessary to survive, as exemplified by the massive looting in Iraq. Logic suggests that those who have control of the weapons of mass destruction (and it isn't the U.S.) would be more than willing to sell them to terrorists. The former Iraqi government agents who control the weapons would be more than happy to make a profit selling chemical weapons to al-Qaeda, which could then be used with impunity against Americans by the terrorists.

The sanctions should not be lifted until the U.S. government has accounted for every weapon of mass destruction that was missing from the documentation submitted by Iraq, so we know those weapons will be destroyed and they will not be available to harm any of us.

BEN WRIGHT

Eugene

Drivers deadly, not highways

The headline for an article by reporter Rebecca Nolan reads "Oregon highways deadly in April" (Register-Guard, May 7). The first line of the article states that "April was a cruel month." Both of these statements are wrong.

Oregon highways are not deadly, and a month of the year cannot be cruel. It is not the highway that is deadly, but the actions of the drivers. If anything is cruel, it is the inconsiderate driver whose irresponsible actions endanger the lives of his or her passengers and those of other drivers on the road. Most of the accidents recounted in the article can be blamed on speeding and the use of alcohol.

A better headline would read "Oregon drivers deadly in April." And as for the month of April, it may be rainy, but it's not cruel.

JEFF LEVY

Springfield

Tax cuts misunderstood

Many people, especially quite a few Democrats, do not want to admit that President John F. Kennedy proposed massive tax cuts to get our economy flowing again. Many people also do not understand what a tax cut is, or that the 2 percent of the most wealthy in our country contribute more than 57 percent of our tax dollars. Many people also do not understand that one of the things so great about our country is our private sector.

GREG ANSON

Eugene

Bozievich a disciplined thinker

The Register-Guard is on target with its May 2 editorial endorsement of Jay Bozievich for the Zone 2 seat on the LCC Board. Bozievich knows how to work with others and has a special talent for getting things done. He is disciplined in his thinking and has exceptional common sense; and yet is inventive in his approach to problem solving.

Bozievich's educational background and extensive work experience in both the public sector and the private sector qualify him uniquely for the LCC Board. Please cast your ballots for Jay Bozievich.

TED SCHERER

Eugene
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Article Details
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Title Annotation:Letters
Publication:The Register-Guard (Eugene, OR)
Article Type:Letter to the Editor
Geographic Code:1U9OR
Date:May 14, 2003
Words:1562
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