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Less precipitation over land areas.

Following three relatively wet decades, precipitation over Earth's land areas declined by some 5 percent during the 1980s, according to rain and snowfall records. The downward trend appears strongest in the tropics of the northern and southern hemisphers, says Henry F. Diaz of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Boulder, Colo. He and his colleagues compiled the precipitation record from information collected at more than 5,300 land stations scattered around the globe.

Because the record shows strong natural variations over the last several decades, Diaz says it will be difficult to use rain and snow amounts to detect signs of human-induced climate change.
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Title Annotation:rain and snowfall declined in the 1980s
Publication:Science News
Date:Jul 13, 1991
Words:105
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