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Left brain/right brain.

Level C

Do you know what your brain looks like? It looks a lot like a walnut. It is divided down the middle into 2 sides. These sides are called the left hemisphere and the right hemisphere.

The 2 sides of your brain are like 2 people living in the same house. They each have different jobs to do. Without both doing their jobs, nothing much would ever get done. Your brain controls everything you do. Each hemisphere of your brain controls one side of your body.

Strange as it may sound, the left hemisphere controls the right side of your body, and the right hemisphere controls the left side of your body.

You use your left brain when you read, speak, and write. It also helps you work with numbers and do things in order. The right side of your brain likes art and music. It helps you when you use your imagination. You use your right brain whenever you recognize faces and put things together, like puzzles.

You do your best thinking when both sides of your brain work as partners.

DID YOU KNOW??

You do not have a single "memory center." Instead, your memories are stored in several areas throughout your brain.

DID YOU KNOW??

Out of every 100 people, about 11 are left-handed.

DID YOU KNOW??

The human brain reaches its full weight by the time a person is 6 years old.

Vocabulary

Here are some words you may not know.

First, use your right brain to imagine what these words mean.

quetzal peduncle curmudgeon spelunker

Now, use your left brain to look them up in a dictionary.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Weekly Lab

Each side of your brain controls the opposite side of your body.
Step 1: Place both of your hands flat on
 your desk. Close your eyes.

Step 2: Have your partner lightly touch
 any finger on your right hand.

Step 3: Now you try to touch the same
 finger on your left hand with
 your right hand.

Step 4: Do this again, but this time have
 your partner touch any finger on
 your left hand first.

Step 5: Try this a few more
 times and then
 switch with your
 partner.


DID YOU KNOW??

95 to 97% of left-brained people are right-handed.

Do this activity last!

Weekly Problem

How well can you remember patterns?

Look at these 2 patterns. Next, cut out the shapes in the box. Now, close your Science Weekly and try to make these patterns out of the shapes.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Writing for Science

Use your right brain to imagine that you're an astronaut on a long space mission. You and your crewmates are getting bored looking out the window and floating around. What's there to do for fun in space? Invent a new game!

While your right brain likes to be creative, your left brain is better at making rules and following steps in order. Use your left brain to write out the rules for your new game. Will there be a game clock? Are there points, goals, or penalties? It's up to you!

DID YOU KNOW??

The average human brain weighs a little more than 3 pounds.

Challenge

Look at these pictures. Do they show a right hand or a left hand? You will be using your right brain here.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Now, try to write your answers using your weaker hand.

DID YOU KNOW??

The brain uses up about 1/5 of the body's oxygen.

Puzzle

Here's a chance to use your right brain again. Your right brain helps you recognize faces.

Do you remember the partner pictures from the front page? Don't look back!

Can you put the pairs together correctly?

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Bonus: Can you put your partners in the same order as they were on the front page? Your left brain helps you put things in order.

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DID YOU KNOW??

The neuron is a nerve cell. They are the most important information handling cells in the brain.

DID YOU KNOW??

The corpus callosum is the bridge that connects both sides of the brain. It contains more than two hundred million nerve fibers.

DID YOU KNOW??

Your memory improves with practice. The more you use it, the better it becomes.

DID YOU KNOW??

The main part of your brain is called the cerebrum. It is about the size of a softball.

Background

Just where in that 3-pound mass of pinkish, jelly-like matter lies the ability to solve complex mathematical equations, paint a picture, or read this very sentence? While the purpose and function of the brain have been debated and researched for centuries, many clues to these bewildering questions have only recently been discovered. Up to the 17th century, many people still believed the heart to be the center of intelligence. We now know that it is our brains that truly distinguish us from all other forms of animal life and give us our distinctive human capabilities and behaviors. Our brains are what make people uniquely themselves.

Although our brains act as a complete system, they are divided into 2 halves known as the right and left hemispheres. The right hemisphere specializes in controlling the movements of the left side of our bodies, while the left hemisphere controls the right side of our bodies. This occurs because the complex nerves that attach our brains to the rest of our bodies cross over as they enter the brain. In addition, research has shown that certain areas in each of the 2 hemispheres are responsible for controlling specific functions. The right side of our brain contains centers that are associated with our creativity, while the left side controls logic and organization. Our right brain is artistic and imaginative. It is visual in nature and sees things as a whole. It likes music, colors, shapes, and helps us with direction and location. It also helps us recognize faces and is the center for our emotions and feelings. Our left brain, on the other hand, controls the centers for our speech, reading, and writing skills. It sees the parts of a problem and categorizes them in an orderly step-by-step manner. It analyzes, reasons, and is responsible for our mathematical abilities. It is our verbal side and our analytical side.

Although both hemispheres are very complex and specialized, they are able to communicate with each other through a mass of nerves called the corpus callosum (KOR pes ka LOH sem). Through these nerve connections, the 2 hemispheres are able to share information and experiences and work together to co-ordinate their different talents and functions. Even though there is constant communication from one side of the brain to the other, it is believed that most of us have either a right-brain or left-brain dominance, or preference.

In the 1960's Dr. Roger Sperry conducted the first major research into discovering the specific characteristics of the right and left hemispheres in human brains. (Earlier experiments with animals had been conducted in the 1950's.) Dr. Sperry worked with "split-brained" patients. These were epileptic patients who had their corpus callosa surgically severed in order to control severe seizures. Once the corpus callosum was severed, the 2 sides of the brain were no longer able to communicate with each other. This enabled Dr. Sperry to study how the separate hemispheres functioned, and to discover the specialized skills and abilities of each. Dr. Sperry won a Nobel Prize for his work and much of today's advanced research is based on his studies. Recent studies have shown that in some patients, when certain control centers have been damaged, other areas of the brain are able to take over the activities normally controlled by the damaged centers.

Today, current research has opened up new vistas into our understanding of the brain and the way it functions. Thanks to advanced brain scanning and imaging procedures, like positron-emission tomography (PET) and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), scientists can now peer into the workings of our brains. Also, surgical procedures using sophisticated equipment can now pinpoint specific control areas, promising new hope for patients affected by stroke, seizures, spinal cord injuries, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other brain-related illnesses. Current research into the biochemical and electrochemical make-up of our brains, and the ways in which messages are transmitted between our neurons, may one day result in better treatment or cures for schizophrenic patients and brain-damaged individuals.

Bring in some additional "Brain-Teasers" and "Mind Boggling" activities for your students to try. There are lots of books and websites available featuring a wide assortment of these challenging activities. Ask them if they are using their left brain, right brain, or both sides to solve these activities and puzzles.

DID YOU KNOW??

The corpus callosum contains more than two hundred million nerve fibers.

Level Pre-A

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 sides. Each side helps us do different things.

Picture Activity

Review left and right by playing a Simon Says game with your students (e.g., raise your right hand, lift your left leg, etc.). Explain that their brains have 2 sides, which work like a house with 2 people living in it. Each one has different jobs to do, but both need to help to get the work done. The left side of our brains helps us talk, write, and count. Have them point to the left picture with the letters and numbers. Next tell them that the right side helps us imagine. It helps us with music and drawing. Have them point to the right picture. Tell them they will be using both sides of their brains to do all the activities in their Science Weekly. Each activity will ask them to do something, and they will need to use their brains to do it.

Vocabulary

Go over all the pictures together first: rain, chain, boat, train, cane. Have your students circle all the ones that rhyme with brain. Ask which one does not rhyme (boat). Have them put an X on it. Tell them that their left brain helps them with rhyming words.

Weekly Lab

Do this activity last. After your students have cut out their animal cards, have them work with partners to play some memory games. Game 1: After putting their cards in a row, one partner will close their eyes while the other partner turns over a card. Then have them ask which card it was. Have them try this again, increasing the number of cards turned over, before trading places. Game 2: One partner will line up the cards in a row and try to memorize them. Then have their partner mix up the cards for them to put back in the order. Tell them that their left brain helps them keep things in order. You can also have them glue the cards to construction paper for a firmer backing.

Weekly Problem

Have your students fill in the missing numbers on the ruler. Tell them they are using their left brains again, because they are working with numbers and putting them in order.

Storytelling

Tell your students WHY-FLY is creating something with his INVENTION MACHINE. What do they think it will be? What will it look like? What will it be able to do? Tell them that they are using the right side of their brains when they use their imaginations. Have them draw WHY-FLY's invention on a separate piece of paper.

Challenge

First, tell your students to color the whole right side of their walnuts. Explain that their right brains are good with art and color. Next, tell them to slide 4 Cheerios[R] (or any ring shaped cereal) onto their pipe cleaners. These represent their neck bones. Then have them attach the pipe cleaner to the walnut with a small piece of clay. Finally, have them write the letter "L" on the left side of their walnut. Tell them their left brain helps them write and count.

Home Base

This activity can be done at home or in class. You may also want to have your students make their thumbprint drawings on index cards, so they can be easily displayed on a bulletin board.

National Science Education Standards

Unifying Concepts and Processes

(K-8)

* Systems, order, and organization

* Evidence, models, and explanation

* Constancy, change, and measurement

* Form and function

Standard A: Science as Inquiry

(K-8)

* Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry

* Understanding about scientific inquiry

Standard C: Life Science

(K-4)

* The characteristics of organisms

* Organisms and environments

(5-8)

* Structure and function in living systems

* Regulation and behavior

Standard F: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives

(5-8)

* Science and technology in society

Standard G: History and Nature of Science

(K-4)

* Science as a human endeavor

(5-8)

* Science as a human endeavor

* History of science

Level A

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 sides. Each side helps us do different things. Many activities require us to use both sides together.

Picture Activity

Review left and right by playing a Simon Says game with your students (e.g., raise your right hand, lift your left leg, etc.). Explain that their brains have 2 sides, which work like a house with 2 people living in it. Each one has different jobs to do, but both need to help to get the work done. The left side of our brains helps us talk, write, and count. Have them point to the left picture with the letters and numbers. Next tell them that the right side helps us imagine. It helps us with music and drawing. Have them point to the right picture. Tell them they will be using both sides of their brains to do all the activities in their Science Weekly. Each activity will ask them to do something, and they will need to use their brains to do it.

Vocabulary

Explain to your students that when they copy words, they are using the left side of their brains, because their left brain helps them read and write. The right side of their brains, on the other hand, helps them with color and art. Tell them they will be using the right side of their brains to color in the pictures.

Weekly Lab

See TN Level Pre-A--WEEKLY LAB. In addition, ask your students which animal pictures rhyme (cat, bat, and possibly rat, depending on whether they identify the rodent as a rat or a mouse). Explain that their left brain helps them with rhyming words.

Weekly Problem

Have them fill in the missing numbers on the ruler. Tell them they are using their left brains again, because they are working with numbers and putting them in order. Answers: 3, 5, 8, 9, 11.

Writing for Science

Tell your students WHY-FLY is creating something with his INVENTION MACHINE. What do they think it will be? What will it look like? What will it be able to do? Tell them that they are using the right side of their brains when they use their imaginations. Have them draw WHY-FLY's invention on a separate piece of paper.

Challenge

First, tell your students to color the whole right side of their walnuts. Explain that their right brains are good with art and color. Next, tell them to slide 4 Cheerios[R] (or any ring shaped cereal) onto their pipe cleaners. These represent their neck bones. Then have them attach the pipe cleaner to the walnut with a small piece of clay. Finally, have them write the letter "L" on the left side of their walnut. Tell them their left brain helps them write and count.

Home Base

This activity can be done at home or in class. You may also want to have your students make their thumbprint drawings on index cards, so they can be easily displayed on a bulletin board.

Level B

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 sides. Each side helps us do different things. Many activities require us to use both sides together. (Draw your students' attention to the partners on the bottom of the front page. Give them some time to study these pictures. They will be used in a memory activity in the Challenge section.

Vocabulary

Tell your students to use their imaginative right brains to think up meanings for these words. Have them attempt to sound out the words for themselves and share their definitions with the class. When they have finished this part of the activity, have them use their left brains to look up the actual meanings in a dictionary. You can either have them draw or write out their answers. Answers: Quetzal--a brightly colored Central American bird--or--Guatemalan currency. Peduncle--a stalk or stem bearing a single flower--or--a bundle of fibers. Curmudgeon--a grumpy, gruff, or miserly person. As an extension, have small groups find other unusual words in the dictionary to present to the whole class. After several guesses, the groups can reveal the exact meaning of their words.

Weekly Lab

Do this activity last. When your students have finished, ask which of the animal cards rhyme (cat, bat, and possibly rat, depending on whether they identify the rodent as a rat or a mouse). Explain that their left brain helps them find rhyming words. It also helps them put their mixed-up cards back in order. Have your students take turns with their partners. You can also have them glue their cards to construction paper for a firmer backing.

Weekly Problem

Sequencing and working with numbers are both functions of our left brain. Answers: 5 6 7, a) 14 15 16, b) 6 5 4, c) 8 10 12.

Writing for Science

Tell your students that we use both sides of our brains in most of the activities we do. We do our best thinking when both sides of our brain work together. They will be using their right brains to imagine a game, and their left brains to make steps and rules.

Challenge

Our right brain helps us recognize faces. Tell your students that the numbers do not have to be in any special order, as long as the pairs are correctly matched. Answers: 1-6, 2-8, 3-5, 4-7. If they have difficulty remembering, give them an opportunity to look back at the front page. Tell them to look for something alike in each pair. Each pair has an associative characteristic to help them (e.g., the 1st pair has stripes, the 2nd has curly hair, the 3rd has long hair and dresses, and the 4th has caps). After looking at the front page again, tell them to close their eyes and count slowly to 30 before trying this activity again.

Home Base

This activity can be done at home or in class. The emotions and inflections we use in our voices can change the entire meaning of what we say, as do body and facial expressions.

DID YOU KNOW??

The human brain reaches its full weight by the time a person is 6 years old.

DID YOU KNOW??

95 to 97% of left-brained people are right-handed.

DID YOU KNOW??

Your memory improves with practice. The more you use it, the better it becomes

DID YOU KNOW??

The main part of your brain is called the cerebrum. It is about the size of a softball.

DID YOU KNOW??

The weight of a human brain is about 1/50 of the total body weight.

DID YOU KNOW??

Out of every 100 people, about 11 are left-handed.

DID YOU KNOW??

The brain Uses up about 1/5 of the body's oxygen.

DID YOU KNOW??

The average human brain weighs a little more than 3 pounds.

DID YOU KNOW??

You do not have a single "memory center." Instead, your memories are stored in several areas throughout your brain.

DID YOU KNOW??

Your brain may look a lot like the wrinkled surface of a walnut, but it is really soft, jelly-like, and pinkish-gray in color.

DID YOU KNOW??

The human brain reaches its full weight by the time a person is 6 years old.

Level C

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 sides, with each side controlling different functions. Explain that they will be using both sides of their brains to do the activities in their Science Weekly. Draw your students' attention to the partners on the bottom of the front page. Give them some time to study these pictures. (They will be used later in a memory activity in the Puzzle section.)

Vocabulary

Encourage your students to use their imaginative right brains to think up meanings for these words. First have them either draw or write out their answers. Then have them attempt to sound out the words for themselves and share their definitions with the class. When they have finished this part of the activity, have them use their left brains to look up the actual meanings in a dictionary. Answers: Quetzal- a brightly colored Central American bird--or--Guatemalan currency. Peduncle--a stalk or stem bearing a single flower--or--a bundle of fibers. Curmudgeon--a grumpy, gruff, or miserly person. Spelunker--someone who explores and studies caves. As an extension, have small groups of students find other unusual words in the dictionary to present to the whole class. After several guesses, they can reveal the exact meanings.

Weekly Lab

Explain that each hemisphere of the brain controls the opposite side of the body. This occurs because the nerves that connect the brain to the rest of our body cross over as they enter the brain.

Weekly Problem

Do this activity last. After your students have tried this activity once, tell them to look back and imagine the patterns as objects (e.g., the first as a person sleeping in a bed and the second as a candle or spaceship). Have them try to recreate the patterns again, keeping these visualizations in mind. Ask them if this makes it easier to remember the pattern shapes. This is called image-association, which draws on the visual strengths of the right brain. As an extension, have a student create a new pattern with these shapes on an overhead projector. Then shut off the overhead and have everyone try to copy the new pattern with their pieces.

Writing for Science

Tell your students that we use both sides of our brains in most of the activities we do. We do our best thinking when both sides of our brain work together. They will be using their right brains to imagine a game, and their left brains to make steps and rules.

Challenge

Answers: a) right b) left c) left d) right.

Puzzle

Our right brain helps us recognize faces. Tell them that the numbers do not have to be in any special order, as long as the pairs are correctly matched. The Bonus activity deals with order, which is a function of our left brain. Answers: (in any order)1-6, 2-8, 3-5, 4-7. Bonus: (in this order only) 2-8, 4-7, 1-6, 3-5. If they have difficulty remembering, give them an opportunity to look back at the front page. Tell them to look for something alike in each pair. Each pair has some associative characteristic to help them (e.g., the 1st pair has stripes, the 2nd has curly hair, the 3rd has long hair and dresses, and the 4th has caps). After looking at the front page again, tell them to close their eyes, count to 30, and try again.

Level D

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 hemispheres, each controlling different functions and different sides of our bodies. Both hemispheres communicate with each other. Many activities in this issue of Science Weekly and in real life require using both sides. Draw your students' attention to the pictures on the bottom of the front page. Give them some time to study these. (They will be used in a memory activity in the Puzzle section later.)

Vocabulary

Encourage your students to use their imaginative right brains to think up meanings for these words. They can either draw or write out their answers. Have them attempt to sound out the words for themselves and share their definitions with the class. When they have finished this part of the activity, have them use their left brains to look up the actual meanings in a dictionary. Answers: Quetzal--a brightly colored Central American bird--or--Guatemalan currency. Peduncle--a stalk or stem bearing a single flower--or--a bundle of fibers. Curmudgeon--a grumpy, gruff, or miserly person. Spelunker--someone who explores and studies caves. Bombazine--a fabric of silk mixed with wool or cotton, often dyed black. As an extension, have small groups find other unusual words in the dictionary to present to the whole class. After several guesses, they can reveal the exact meaning of their words.

Weekly Lab

Explain that each hemisphere of the brain controls the opposite side of the body. This occurs because the nerves that connect the brain to the rest of our body cross over as they enter the brain. Bonus: Your students will either write their names in a scrawl, or their feet will start to mimic the writing movements of their hands. As we grow older, our brain and body get used to performing certain movements in certain ways. It is often difficult to change these patterns (such as trying to write with the other hand).

Weekly Problem

Though most math activities involve the left brain, this type of problem uses the right brain for spatial orientation. It also involves putting parts together to form a whole visual image.

Writing for Science

Tell your students that we use both sides of our brains in most of the activities we do. We do our best thinking when both sides of our brain work together. They will be using their right brains to imagine a game, and their left brains to create steps and rules.

Challenge

Answers: a) right b) left c) left d) right.

Puzzle

Our visually oriented right brain helps us recognize faces, while our verbally adept left brain helps us remember names. Answers: Sam, Pam, Tim, Curtis, Beth, Helen, Ricky, Paul. If they have difficulty remembering, have them look back at the front page and tell them to look for something special about each picture and its name. All of the people have associative characteristics (e.g., Sam starts with S and has stripes, Pam has pig tails, Tim has a tie, Curtis has curly hair, Beth has bangs, Helen has headband, Ricky is wearing red, and Paul has a pocket. They may find other ways to help them remember the faces and names. After looking at the faces again, tell them to close their eyes and count slowly to 30 before trying this activity again.

Level E

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 sides, with each side controlling different functions and different sides of the body. The 2 hemispheres communicate with each other through the corpus callosum. Many activities in this issue of Science Weekly and in real life require using both sides.

Vocabulary

Encourage them to use their imaginative right brains to think up meanings for these words. They can either draw or write out their answers. Have them attempt to sound out the words for themselves and share their definitions with the class. When they have finished this part of the activity, have them use their left brains to look up the actual meanings in a dictionary. Answers: Quetzal--a brightly colored Central American bird--or--Guatemalan currency. Peduncle--a stalk or stem bearing a single flower--or--a bundle of fibers. Curmudgeon--a grumpy, gruff, or miserly person. Spelunker--someone who explores and studies caves. Bombazine--a fabric of silk mixed with wool or cotton, often dyed black. Cryptology--the study and use of secret codes and ciphers. As an extension, have small groups find other unusual words in the dictionary to present to the whole class. After several guesses, they can reveal the exact meaning of their words.

Weekly Lab

Lab A: This activity will help reinforce the concept that each hemisphere controls the opposite side of our bodies. Have your students refer back to the picture on the front page of the nerves crossing as they enter the brain. Lab B: Your students will either write their names in a scrawl, or their feet will start to mimic the writing movements of their hands. As we grow older, our brain and body get used to performing certain movements in certain ways. It is often difficult to change these patterns (such as trying to write with the other hand).

Weekly Problem

Answer: C. Have your students think these out visually before they cut, fold, and form the cubes. Though most math activities involve the left brain, this type of problem uses their right brain for spatial orientation and putting parts together to form a visual whole.

Writing for Science

Right brain activities of this kind encourage your students to use their imaginations and creativity to form a whole from unrelated parts. Their left brains will help them organize this information and write it down as a complete story.

Challenge

Some people have a fairly equal balance of both sides of their brains, but most of us have a dominant hemisphere. Remind your students that we use both sides of our brains in most of the activities we do. Often one side will tend to lead more, depending on the activity, while at other times they may carry an equal share. The concept of a dominant hemisphere may help them better understand their own individual thinking style and the way they solve problems. People who are left-brained tend to handle things verbally. They may analyze problems and prefer to organize details logically. Right-brained people may solve things by looking at the whole picture. They may prefer to look for creative solutions, instead of using more conventional approaches.

Puzzle

Like the Weekly Problem, this puzzle activity uses your students' right brains for spatial orientation and in forming a whole visual image. As an extension, suggest that they try this activity using a left-brained approach, by trying to memorize the locations of all the triangles. They will find this is much more difficult than looking at the puzzle as a whole picture.

Level F

Main Concepts: Our brain is divided into 2 sides, with each side controlling different functions and different sides of the body. The 2 hemispheres of our brain communicate with each other through the corpus callosum. Many activities in this issue of Science Weekly and in real life require using both sides.

Weekly Lab

Labs A and B: See TN Level E--WEEKLY LAB. Lab C: This lab will show how signals can sometimes get mixed up. This may also happen when we attempt a complex or new activity.

Weekly Problem

Answers: D and F. Have them think these out visually before they cut, fold, and form their cubes. Though most math activities involve the left brain, this type of problem uses their right brain for spatial orientation and putting parts together to form a visual whole.

Writing for Science

Right-brain activities of this kind encourage your students to use their imaginations and creativity to form a whole from unrelated parts. Their left brains will help them organize this information and write it down as a complete story. They may not know the meanings of quetzal, which is both a brightly colored Central American bird and the basic unit of currency in Guatemala (they can use either meaning); and spelunker, one who explores and studies caves. Encourage them to look these words up in a dictionary.

Challenge

Some people have a fairly equal balance of both sides of their brains, but most of us have a dominant hemisphere. Remind your students that we use both sides of our brains in most of the activities we do. Often one side will tend to lead more, depending on the activity, while at other times they may carry an equal share. The concept of a dominant hemisphere may help them better understand their own individual thinking style and the way they solve problems. People who are left-brained tend to handle things verbally. They may analyze problems and prefer to organize details logically. Right-brained people may solve things by looking at the whole picture. They may prefer to look for creative solutions, instead of using more conventional approaches.

Puzzle

Making and listening to music require the use of both sides of the brain. Some aspects of music, though, rely more heavily on one side, such as rhythm, which is a strength of the right brain. Have your students invent a rhythm. They can tap it out with their hands, pencils, feet, or any instruments available. Then have them try to come up with a way to write down their rhythms, so they and others can reproduce them later. They will be using their left brains to plot out their rhythms and their right brains to devise creative solutions. Encourage your students who can already read music notation to invent an alternative way of writing down their rhythms. Finally, have them trade with a partner and see how well they can interpret each other's rhythms.

Thinking Beyond

Encourage your students to do some right-brain activities that will exercise their creativity and imaginations.

(a) Use some unusual titles to motivate creative writing stories (e.g., What Happened When the Dingrazzalator Switch Broke Off Our Camboblatron, The Turbo-Powered Tuna, or The Substitute Teacher from Saturn, etc.)

(b) Give them a series of figure-8s and have them create totally different pictures or objects from each.

(c) Suggest some open-ended scenarios or story lines and have them finish the stories.

(d) Have them imagine that they are an inanimate object and create 1st person stories (e.g., an ice cube, a basketball hoop, a tire with a nail in it, etc.).

(e) Name some common objects, like a can or rake, and have them think up at least 3 different ways of using them.

Weekly RESOURCES

Helpful Sources for Planning your Science Weekly Classroom Activities

Recommended Resources

* Brynie, Faith Hickman. Physical Brain: Amazing Brain. San Diego: Blackbirch Press, 2001

* Farndon, John. The Big Book of the Brain. New York: Peter Bedrick Books, 2000

* Murphy, Pat, ed. The Brain Explorer (Exploratorium at Home). New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1999

* Parker, Steve. Learning a Lesson: How You See, Think and Remember. New York: Franklin Watts, 1991

* Simon, Seymour. The Brain: Our Nervous System. New York: William Morrow & Co., 1997

* Springer, Sally P. and George Deutsch. Left Brain, Right Brain. New York: W.H. Freeman & Co., 1993

* Stafford, Patricia. Your Two Brains. New York: Atheneum Books, 1986

Internet Resources

Animated cartoon and quiz about the brain--http://www.brainpop.com/health/nervous/brain/index.weml

Hemispheric dominance quiz--http://www.mtsu.edu/~devstud/advisor/hemis.html

A general overview of the brain and weblinks--http: www.biology.about.com/library/weekly/aa100401a.htm

How Stuff Works' brain page--http://www.howstuffworks.com/brain.htm

Neuroscience for kids--http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html

Materials Needed for Issue 11--3 States of Water

Level Pre-A--ice cubes, water, plastic zip-lock bags, plastic cups, 5 oz. paper cups, plastic spoons, measuring spoons, pre-sweetened drink mix (such as Kool-Aid[R]), access to a freezer

Level A--ice cubes, water, plastic zip-lock bags, plastic cups, 5 oz. paper cups, plastic spoons, measuring spoons, sugar, unsweetened drink mix (such as Kool-Aid[R]), access to a freezer

Level B--paper lunch bags, ice cubes, water, plastic zip-lock bags, plastic cups, 5 oz. paper cups, plastic spoons, measuring spoons, sugar, yogurt, unsweetened drink mix (such as Kool-Aid[R]), access to a freezer

Level C--plastic cups, plastic zip-lock bags, ice, water

Level D--plastic cups, plastic zip-lock bags, markers, ice, a clock, access to a freezer

Level E--plastic cups, plastic zip-lock bags, markers, ice, a clock, access to a freezer

Level F--plastic cups, plastic zip-lock bags, markers, paper towels, ice, a clock, access to a freezer
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Publication:Science Weekly
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 24, 2003
Words:5946
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