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LONG-RANGE TWINJET SERVICE GROWING, BOEING SAYS

 SINGAPORE, Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Use of twin-engine airliners on long overwater service is now commonplace and growing, a Boeing executive said here today.
 Gordon Bethune, vice president of Boeing's Customer Services Division and a pilot, said the three- and four-engine airliners that were once the mainstay of long-distance flights are increasingly being replaced by twinjets.
 Bethune told a forum hosted by Singapore-based Aerospace Magazine that twinjets such as the Boeing 767 have proven so safe, reliable and economical they now outnumber L1011s, DC-10s and 747s on many sectors. For example, he said, North American carriers now carry out more twinjet flights across the Atlantic than the combined total of three- and four- engine flights.
 As well, twin-engine crossings have become commonplace between the United States and Hawaii, Australia/New Zealand and Hawaii, and Australia and Mauritius.
 "Twin-engine operations offer from 5 to 9 percent lower operating costs than three- or four-engine aircraft," Bethune said. "Lower operating costs will translate into lower ticket prices for passengers."
 In the piston engine era of the 1950s, regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration mandated that two-engine passenger planes had to fly routes within one hour of a suitable alternate airport in case of engine failure. Modern jet engines have proven to be far more reliable than their piston predecessors, and certain airliners and engine combinations gradually were approved to operate two, and in some cases three, hours from alternate airports.
 The availability of economical long-range twinjets such as the Boeing 767 has given airlines an alternative to the 747, which simply is too big for some routes, Bethune said. "Right now, operators are conducting more than 10,000 extended-range flights every month with Boeing twins. In all, 19 operators of the 757 and 38 airlines and charter services with the 767 carry out these flights."
 In the entire history of twinjet over-ocean service, there has never been an accident as a result of an airliner's two engines failing due to unrelated causes.
 When Boeing engineers began designing an airliner smaller than the 747 but larger than the 767, a three-engine configuration was considered. But the reliability and efficiency of twins like the 767 gave them the confidence to introduce the new 777 as a twinjet. That airplane, to enter service in May 1995, will carry nearly as many passengers as early 747s.
 -0- 2/17/93
 /CONTACT: Jack Gamble of Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, 206-237-1715/
 (BA)


CO: Boeing Commercial Airplane Group ST: Washington IN: AIR SU:

SW -- SE001 -- 7316 02/17/93 12:01 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 17, 1993
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