Printer Friendly

LIVING: IN THE GARDEN: GET READY FOR SPRING; 20 top tips to help wake up your garden.

Byline: Howard Drury

1 Carefully plan the sowing of seeds over the next few weeks, remembering not to leave them in the propagator too long or let them catch a cold after removing them.

2 Give your lawnmower a check-over, adjusting the blades, oiling and greasing where necessary. Check oil levels and fill with fresh petrol ready for use. Adjust the height of cut to maximum setting and check that the machine starts. Electrical mowers should be checked over for loose connections. Ensure any cables are in good condition.

3 Plant any deciduous trees, shrubs and hedging plants as soon as possible.

4 Have a tidy round the garden, brushing off lawns, sweeping paths and tickling the soil between spring bedding plants with a long-handled hand fork.

5 Hand-pollinate peaches, nectarines and apricots with a camel-hair brush - there are few pollinating insects around when these plants are in flower.

6 Given suitable weather, start to prepare a fine tilth on the vegetable plot - but don't dig deeply, bringing cold soil to the surface.

7 Fuchsias pruned earlier will now be producing young shoots which should be pinched back regularly to encourage bushy growth.

8 Take early-flowering chrysanthemum cuttings and pot on the rooted late-flowering cuttings. 9 Keep your eye on watering because temperatures in greenhouses and on window sills will rocket during sunny weather.

10 Lift and divide snowdrops, replanting as soon as possible.

11 Prune back hard those shrubs that flower on new wood such as hydrangea paniculata, caryopteris clandonensis and buddleia davidii.

12 The first sowings of early vegetables can be made under fleeces, provided the ground isn't too wet or the air too cold.

13 Pinch back fuchsia and geranium cuttings to encourage bushy habit.

14 Make further sowings of bedding plants and keep germinated seedlings in good light to maintain quality in young plants.

15 With a little more power in the sun at this time of the year, it may be necessary to damp down greenhouse floors and give plants generally slightly more water.

16 Finish planting those roses and other deciduous shrubs and fruit trees as soon as possible. They're beginning to break into growth and it must be done before the buds emerge.

17 Tidy up the herbaceous border and put down some slug pellets. Take care not to damage any roots and tidy up wherever possible.

18 If you want to apply a mulch, this is a good time of the year.

19 This is your last opportunity before plants break into growth to repair any broken fence panels and generally treat pergolas, fences and fence posts with a timber treatment. It's much easier to do before the plants spring into life.

20 On the rock garden, there's lots of tidying up and cutting back to be done.
COPYRIGHT 2002 Birmingham Post & Mail Ltd
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England)
Date:Mar 3, 2002
Words:466
Previous Article:LIVING: HEALTH: DOCTOR DAVID: What's causing my bad chest?
Next Article:LIVING: IN THE GARDEN: Plant of the week: Primroses.


Related Articles
Spring in the air at show; OUTBREAK FAILS TO HALT GARDEN EXHIBITION AND CROWDS RESPOND IN THEIR THOUSANDS.
Spring in the air at show; EPIDEMIC FAILS TO STOP THOUSANDS ATTENDING STONELEIGH GARDEN EXHIBITION.
Tired, maybe ... bored, never! (After chores).
WEEKEND: GARDENING: ME & MY GARDEN: Small but colourful plot is just perfect for Mr Thompson.
Seasonal highlights.
Now is the time to prepare your garden for the winter.
A weather eye on your garden; With a little bit of careful planning, your 'outdoor room' can still look great despite climate change.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters