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LITTLE CHANGE IN THE CONFERENCE BOARD MEASURE OF CONSUMER CONFIDENCE

 NEW YORK, Jan. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board's Measure of Consumer Confidence, which had chalked up impressive gains late last year, leveled off in January. The present index reading (1985 equals 100) is 77.0, representing a moderate decline of about one point for the month. This follows a gain of more than 23 points, over the two preceding months.
 In the latest survey, consumers are more positive than last month in their assessment of prevailing business conditions, but somewhat less optimistic in their expectations for the months ahead. The January decline in confidence is almost entirely accounted for by the South Central and Pacific states.
 Buying plans in January are less positive now than in December.
 The Consumer Confidence Survey is based on a representative sample of 5,000 households. The monthly survey is conducted for The Conference Board by National Family Opinion, Inc. (NFO) of Greenwich, Conn.
 More Optimism About Current Job Picture
 "Given the imposing improvement in the measure of consumer confidence registered in the final months of 1992, the slight decline in January -- one point -- is of faint consequence," says Fabian Linden, executive director of The Conference Board's Consumer Research Center. "In the latest probe, consumer expectations, which had registered an imposing gain late last year, gave back moderate ground in January. More important is the public's increasingly favorable assessment of prevailing conditions. This component of the survey has now registered smart gains for three consecutive months. The consumer's assessment of current conditions is now more positive than it has been in more than a year and a half."
 Compared with December, significantly fewer people now say that prevailing business conditions are "bad," while more than previously say they are "good." However, negative views still outnumber positive responses by a very large margin. On the issue of present employment opportunities, there is a fairly large decline in the number of people reporting jobs are "hard to get." The reading is now lower than it has been in a long time.
 Source: Consumer Confidence Survey, January 1993, The Conference Board.
 -0- 1/26/93
 /CONTACT: Fabian Linden, executive director-Consumer Research Center of The Conference Board, 212-339-0303/


CO: Conference Board ST: New York IN: SU: ECO

TS-LD -- NY003 -- 8968 01/26/93 09:59 EST
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Date:Jan 26, 1993
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