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Kodak Donates Camera Used by John Glenn to National Air and Space Museum as Tribute to Glenn.

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Dec. 3, 1998--Eastman Kodak Company has arranged for the donation to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum the Kodak DCS 460 digital camera used by Senator John Glenn and fellow astronauts during Glenn's historic return to space.

In presenting the camera to Senator Glenn and Director Admiral Donald Engen, Kodak's Chief Executive Officer George Fisher said, "Senator Glenn's personal courage and dedication to the U.S. space program serves as an example for everyone. Kodak was honored to be part of Senator Glenn's recent space flight, as we were during his Friendship 7 mission 36 years ago. I am pleased to present this camera to the Air and Space Museum on behalf of some 90,000 Kodak men and women around the world."

Fisher made the presentation before approximately 400 guests at a private dinner recognizing the Senator's accomplishments here tonight at the Museum and concurrently announcing the formation of the John Glenn Institution for Public Service and Public Policy at Ohio State. "It is our hope that this camera will eventually become part of the museum's public display alongside the photographic products used on earlier space missions," Fisher said.

Fisher pointed out that Kodak has played a key role in the exploration of space with a variety of photographic and digital imaging products -- still and motion -- that have enabled scientists and astronauts to document space exploration.

For example, the company produced a special roll of film used to record how then Astronaut John Glenn reacted to the rigors of space flight during his 1962 mission in Friendship 7. Kodak made a special stereo camera used by Apollo astronauts on the surface of the moon in 1969.

In more recent years, Kodak technology has taken to space in the form of digital imaging. The company's Kodak DCS 460 digital still cameras are used on all space shuttle missions to capture and transmit back to Earth high-resolution images in real time. And, Kodak made the digital imaging sensors that enabled the Sojourner rover to navigate and move about on the surface of Mars last year.

Next year, NASA will launch the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the last of three space telescopes. Kodak scientists and technicians played a major role in that project, assembling and aligning the AXAF's complex optical bench. When in orbit, the AXAF will be able to gather X-ray images from distant stars and galaxies and focus them with the precision equivalent to a golfer sinking a hole-in-one on a 75-year drive.

Editor's Note: For additional information about Kodak, visit our web site on the Internet at: www.kodak.com/
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Publication:Business Wire
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Dec 3, 1998
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