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Kickshaws.

~ WHAT'S IN THOSE GINGER SNAPS?

Jim Puder found a brave new word recently. As he puts it, "I was perusing the list of ingredients on a bag of ginger snaps when I came to this item: 'palm oil and/or interesterified soybean oil.' Whoa! Interesterified soybean oil? Really? They can do that? I have no idea what this 'interesterification' process or makeover might consist of, but imagine if it it could be tweaked to work on stuff besides soybean oil--cauliflower, say, or light beer, or books, or movies, or jobs, or this copy, or even some presidential candidates!"

~ POP GOES THE PRESIDENT

Jim wonders, "Is it time yet to uncork Kickshaws' quadrennial spate of presidential election palindromes? I ask because the problem of palindromizing candidate Donald Trump's surname has been nagging at me. The only useful partial reversal word for 'Trump' that I can find is 'murther,'which M-W defines as a dialectal variety of'murder.' Given The Donald's generally dismal press notices, it seems a little unfair that his surname should, in addition, forever necessarily have to be associated with homicide in palindromes, e.g.,
      He was, I saw, sad. 'I'm a 'red, damp murtherer,
' eh?' 'Trump,
     madder, a 'Midas' was,
 I saw. "Eh?" 


As for the surname of his Republican rival Ted Cruz, "urceolate" is a possible (and not unapt) partial reversal word for it, but no worthwhile palindrome occurs to me. Moving on to the Democratic candidates, the familiar palindrome "NOT NIL: CLINTON!", tepid endorsement though it may be, is at any rate a slogan readymade for campaign buttons. As for Bemie, the palindromic campaign slogan "HO, DEM! IT'S RED, NASAL LEFT-FELLA SANDERS' TIME! D'OH!" may need a little more work yet, but at least it's enthusiastic and worded to resonate with its target demographic."

~MORE TRUMPAGRAMS

The comedians and talk-show hosts are having a blast with Donald Trump, the man who would be insane as president. Anil provided some more anagrams of the P.T. Bamum of Politics. Wherever Trump goes somewhere, he brings his circus with him. Here are more anagrams provided by Anil.
 MAD OLD PR NUT AD-MOLD PR NUT 


RAM UNTOLD DP (DP = displaced persons; also disabled persons, Democratic Party, Directions of the President, all from Cassell's Dict, of Abbrvs.)
 ODD LUMP RANT 'N ODD RAT LUMP NAD-RUMP DOLT (Nads = gonads,
Cassell Dict, of Slang) PROUD DAMN LT. DUMP-LAND ROD--'ND LOUD
TRAMP RUN, DAMP DOLT! or DAMP DOLT RUN (not a political "wet",
just the opposite, wet like a dishcloth) RUN DAM'D PLOT DUD R.-PLOT
MAN (R = Right or Republican) RUM ODD PLANT RUMPLAND DOT (slang for a
tight ass hole) MAD-PLOD RUNT DO RUM DT PLAN (delirium tremens, ie
delirious) D*M*NT*D ORAL-UP--or OUR D*M*NT*D "PAL" 


~ TALK ABOUT POLITICS!

Bill Brandt explains the secret of communication in politics: "This is the political season and the TV and radio programs are overflowing with political speeches. Many of them contain one or more cliches. Cliches are so common that it is sometimes hard for people to speak with out using at least one cliche. I thought it would be interesting to create a political speech that was nothing but cliches. After reading it for a few times it almost starts to sound like a real speech."
                     POLITICAL CLICHE SPEECH 


When I talked to them I tried to bend over backwards but as luck would have it I got hit below the belt. They drove me up a wall and got under my skin. I was in a world of hurt. I was fit to be tied and bent all out of shape. It blew my mind and burned me up. In a New York minute I went ballistic. Been there, done that. I hate it when that happens. We're all in the same boat and it's a rough road and a can of worms. What it boils down to is that it's a rat race pure and simple, and you can take that to the bank. At the end of the day it's a foregone conclusion that we're between a rock and a hard place. When all is said and done things are going down the tubes, and that takes the cake. What's wrong with this picture? I don't want to make a mountain out of a mole hill but I can put two and two together. I don't have an axe to grind and I do not want to make waves, but this is the real world. The bottom line is, now more then ever, we don't have time to stop and smell the roses. It's nothing to sneeze at. We have to get our ducks in a row if we want to have even a glimmer of hope. We can't just shoot the breeze waiting for the dust to settle. We have to stop horsing around and can't be asleep at the switch. We have to wake up and smell the coffee. Let's stop walking on egg shells and cut to the chase. It's better late than never. It's not rocket science. It's a slam dunk no brainer. We have to get back to the basics and nip it in the bud. We have to knuckle down and cut the mustard, but we can't knuckle under. It's easy as pie and a piece of cake. From the get-go, there's no ifs, ands, or buts about it. For all intents and purposes we have to start from scratch and go for broke. It's a long shot now or never. Last but not least we have to up the ante and give them the whole nine yards, the whole ball of wax, lock stock and barrel. It's a last ditch effort. It's do or die. The sky's the limit. No guts no glory. You are not being taken for a ride, this is not a snow job, it's the real deal. Now that's what I'm talking about. Sounds like a plan, lean and mean. It works for me. Check it out. It's humongous, it's the real McCoy. I think we are on the same page. You gotta love it. You know the drill, you know what's up, and you know the ropes. Stop feeling down and out and get with the program. Step on it, stick with it, and spread the word. Sit tight, hang in there, stay on your toes and don't get cold feet. It may be a close call but I think it will be a clean sweep. It's their last hurrah. Soon they will throw in the towel, signed, sealed, and delivered. We will be out of the woods and it will be all over but the shouting. All's well that ends well.

~ AUTOMOTIVE NAMEPLAY

Alan Mandel of Framingham, Mass., found an amazing set of automobile names, as shown below, and he explains how they are linked together through the magic of wordplay:

Think of a series of four well-known makes and models of cars that have the following property: You can change one letter in the first name and rearrange the result to get the second name. Then change one letter in that and rearrange the result to get the third name. Then do the same to get the fourth name. Here is the completed chain of names:
        SUBARU--> TAURUS--> SATURN --> SENTRA 


Now that you've got the idea, the challenge can be continued. By enlarging the category slightly to include SUV names and bygone car names, the series can be extended to five names. Can you figure out the names in this expanded chain? Note that one of the names in the chain above will have to be excluded to make the chain work. If the challenge is driving you crazy, then slam on the brakes and turn to Answers and Solutions at the end.

~ ALL VOWEL INTERCHANGE

Jeff Grant has discovered a possibly unique word that shows how English works with great freedom in its breezy spelling habits: "Lori Cooper's 75,000 Baby Names (2009) lists the male given name Nevan, which is Irish for 'holy'. The only variant spellings shown are the palindromic Neven, and Nevin, Nevon, Nevun and Nevyn. This means that the name can be spelt with any of the vowels (including 'y') in second last position. Presumably it is pronounced the same no matter which variant is used. Are there other names like this?"

~ EXPLORING THE BADLANDS

Recent editions of Kickshaws have featured lists of geographical names ending in--land. Jim Puder searched for more names, and he found many more, including the great grand-daddy, in terms of both size and seniority, verlooked so far has been the great-granddaddy, in terms of both size and seniority, of all such "lands." Can you identify that land? See Answers and Solutions.

According to Jim, "Annother collectible cohort of geographical names sharing a common ending might be municipal names terminating in--abad. This ending is found in the names of a number of cities and towns located in Islamic or Islam-influenced areas of central, south and southwest Asia, and evidently means something like 'city' or 'town' in one or more of the languages of the region. It is scarcely the fault of the namers of these places if some Anglophones find such names faintly amusing.

As attested by such names as Abbottabad and Leninabad, many--abad names seem to be of fairly recent historical origin; nonetheless, some of them, such as Leninabad (now Khujand), have already gone the way of Constantinople. The following list, which was entirely compiled by scrutinizing maps in several atlases, is unlikely to be exhaustive. Where I have noticed that a name was spelled differently in different atlases, I have listed both spellings. Country abbreviations:: Afg--Afghanistan; Azer--Azerbaijan; Kyr--Kyrgyzstan; Pak--Pakistan; Tai--Tajikistan; Uzb--Uzbekistan." Here is Jim's surprisingly long list.

ABBOTTABAD (Pak)

ADILABAD (India)

AHMADABAD AHMEDABAD (India)

ALIABAD (Iran)

ALLAHABAD (India)

AMIRABAD (Iran)

ASADABAD (Iran)

ASHKABAD ASCHABAD ASHGABAT (Turkmenistan)

ASTERABAD (Iran)

AURANGABAD (Iindia)

BAHRAMABAD (Iran)

BEKABAD (Uzb)

CALILABAD (Azer)

DAULATABAD (Afg)

DOWLAMABAD (Iran)

DZHALAL-ABAD (Kyr)

EDALABAD (India)

EMINABAD (Pak)

ESLAMABAD (Iran)

FAISAL ABAD (Pak)

FAIZABAD (India, Afg, China) FEYZABAD (Afg)

FARID ABAD (India)

FARUKHABAD FARRUKHABAD (India)

FATEHABAD (India)

FIROZABAD (India)

FIRUZABAD (Iran)

GHAZIABAD (India)

GONABAD GUNABAD (Iran)

HAFIZABAD (Pak)

HOSEYNABAD (Iran)

HOSHANGABAD HUS AIN ABAD (India)

HYDERABAD (India, Pak) HAIDARABAD (Pak)

ISLAMABAD (Pak, China)

JACOBABAD (Pak)

JAFARABAD (India)

JATARABAD (Iran)

JAHANABAD (India)

JAHANGIRABAD (India)

JALALABAD (Afg, India) JELALABAD (Afg)

KARIRABAD (India)

KHAIRABAD (India)

KHALIL ABAD (India)

KHANABAD (Afg)

KHORRAMABAD KHURRAMABAD (Iran)

KIROVABAD (Azer)

LENINABAD (Taj)

MAHABAD (Iran)

MAHMUD ABAD (Iran)

MEHRABAD (Iran)

MIRABAD (Afg)

MOMINABAD (India)

MORADABAD MURADABAD (India)

MUHAMMADABAD (India)

MURSHIDABAD (India)

MUZZAFARABAD (India or Pak--on the border, atlases disagree as to

which side)

NAJABABAD NAJIBABAD (India)

NAJAFABAD NEJAFABAD (Iran)

NASRABAD (Iran)

NASRATABAD (Iran)

NAZIMABAD (Pak)

NIZAMABAD (India)

NOSIRABAD (India, Bangladesh)

NOVABAD (Taj)

ORDZENIKIDZEABAD (Taj)

OSMANABAD (India)

QADERABAD (Iran)

QADIRABAD (Pak)

SA'ABAD ABAD Iran)

SABIRABAD (Azer)

SADABABAD (Iran)

SADABAD (India)

SAFIABAD (Iran)

SECUNDERABAD SIKANDERABAD (India)

SHAHABAD (India)

SHAHARABAD (Iran)

SHEYKABAD (Afg)

SHIKOHABAD (India)

SHIRABAD (Uzb)

SOLTANABAD SULTANABAD (Iran)

WAZIRABAD (Pak)

ZEYDABAD (Afg)

ZURAB AD (Iran)

"Disappointingly," he says, " few of these bad boys seem very amenable to being palindromized. One which does, grudgingly, permit itself to be drawn out a bit is Moradabad, which is a boldface headword in the Merriam-Webster unabridged:

A Moradabad ahi had a bad aroma.

Thank you, Morrie; that was ineffable."

~ FROM JOHN FALCONE, GEOGRAPHIC ANAGRAM WINNER

John Falcone was one of the Geographic Anagram Contest winners. He is a professional bassoon player in the Orquesta Sinfonica del Principado de Asturias. He lives in Spain, and I live in Iowa City. When I went to mail his prize to him, the post office wanted to charge $60 for first class mail from me of Iowa to John of Spain. I didn't know it would cost so much, and I couldn't afford it. John paid the mailing charge, and I sent him his prizes plus some extra items. When he got the package, he wrote me this very kind-hearted email that follows:

"Just wanted to let you know that the package arrived late last week. I'm overwhelmed by the prizes! Reading your poetry thesis was a moving experience, perhaps helped by the personal dedication. And the Comicards, Poetry Postcards, "A Visit from St. Alphabet," "Poetry City" all marvelous stuff. The tokens will be treasured as well. Though my late Grandmother used to continually warn us not to take any wooden nickels, I think I'll keep the Dr. Alphabet edition regardless. So thanks for everything, including the check which arrived intact."

~ DUNG WHISKERS

John says, "I've been toying with the "Anguish Languish," invented in the 50's by one Howard Chace. If you don't know what that is, below are some famous "Dung Whiskers" I've concocted. For fun, try reading them out loud. Often, listeners decipher the original before the reader. For a translation, turn to Answers and Solutions at the end of Word Ways.

1. Beat up hyper pigged up egger beg guild papers. Eight-pack cove big guild papers dead beat up hyper pig. Upbeat dead bi-ped pigged up egger beg guild papers. Wears up egger beg guild papers beat up hyper pigged?

2. Bet he bother butt sum put her Butt cheese head is butt hers bit her! A fly putted am I pa there Little may gum eye pa there bit her. Soap eddie bought her boats ember there but her.

3. Humus root dread her root truck check ever root truck hood check could?

4. Chisels easels bite a seizure.

5. High screen, use screen, willow screen fries screen.

6. Rum burp maybe bag heap dumpsters.

7. This sect's thick cheeks sex this heap's egg.

~ WALES PLACE DROMES

John came up with the first three geographic palindromes below.

-A buck-ride. Miami I'm aimed. Irk Cuba.

National fraternity meets in Texas town for vacation send-off while I dream of a black Christmas

-At Nash to go en masse for Pi Nu Fiji fun, I profess am neo-goth Santa.

Fictitious rule; real place -Hat use law; Wales, Utah

About the last one, John explains that he "recently posted the last one on a Facebook page called "USO (and friends) Palindrome Pals" which includes friends of mine in the Utah Symphony Orchestra. Lori Wike (bassoon) and James Hall (oboe) had fun with the Wales idea as well; inspired, no doubt, by their proximity to this miniscule town. With their permission I include some of their palindromic contributions to that thread below."
 (John Falcone) Fictitious rule; real place
 -Hat use law; Wales, Utah
(James Hall) -"Wales!" proclaimed Ness. "Endemial corpse
law!" (Lori Wike) -Wales! Oppose law!
(JH) Clamorous rural calculator
-Wales' Ionic Abaci = Noise law!
(JF)
-Wales Utes set; use law! -Wales Utes eradicated IBEX. Axe, bidet acid
are set. Use law! -Wales Utes eradicated IBEX, ULE, deluxe bidet acid.
Are set. Use law!
(LW) -Wales, Rohan art ran a horse law. 


~ JIM PUDER'S SNOWBALL SENTENCE

A "snowball" is a cascade sentence which is also palindromical. At Dave's request, several readers submitted snowballs to the February Kickshaws, the longest one being a nine-worder by John Falcone. Here is my attempt at a ten-word snowball; as its strained intelligibility might suggest, its composition, such as it is, did not come easily:
                Sit; O, no ado! Port sages, Ilaine--geminal,
               eel-anime--genialise Gastropoda on Otis. 


("Geminal," an OED word, means "explained as a pair." "Eel-anime," a coined word, is an imaginary musical direction meaning "animatedly, in the manner of eels." "Genialise" with an "s" is found in Chambers)

~ JEFF GRANT'S SNOWBALL PALINDROMES

A snowball palindrome begins with a single letter and continues by adding a letter with each word Here are three snowball palindromes of great lengths (10-letter, 12-letter, and 13-the-letter). by Jeff Grant.

1. 'C'Is Sal Coen (10 letters)
         'C' is Sal Coen, resin amoret, alumish
        simulate Romaniser.Neoclassic! 


There are people on the Net named Sal Coen, but this is a different one, a sculptor whose works bear the initial 'C'. Here he is being denigrated by a critic who describes a plastic-looking statue of an amoret (lover), and suggests the sculptor is trying to imitate old Roman and Classical styles.

2. The Mysterious, Obsessive A (12 letters)
          A in Amo-tell Abyra, Tillet; assever bimester, rag-garret
        semibreves, satellitary balletomania. 


The mysterious, obsessive A has apparently been holed up in a shabby attic in Amo, Indiana, for two months composing way-out ballet music. Abyra is a female given name in various sources, Tillet is a surname (e.g. wrestler Maurice Tillet), rag-garret is a coinage. All other words are listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1989.

3. Secret Service Snowball Palindrome (13 letters)
         'A' is Alp, Oena; raped artnik, Cotset's
aconital deliverer,
        pre-reviled Latino-caste stock-in-trade-paraneoplasia? 


Female operative Oena receives cryptic intel on the legendary Peruvian-born enforcer 'A' (code name Alpaca, or Alp for short). Formerly a farm-worker, this woman-mountain was apparently a violated art-lover who became a bitter and venomous (aconital) bringer of retribution to enemies of the Cotsets, a long-detested Latin American criminal gang, named after a low class of early English villeins (peasants). Alp's violent behaviour may have resulted from a condition called paraneoplasia, neurological and hormonal disturbances associated with malignant tumours.

Oena is a female forename, e.g. book illustrator Oena Armstrong, 'artnik' and 'pre-reviled' appear in Net quotes, as does 'Latino-caste' (used attributively, so hyphenated). The other terms can be found in various standard dictionaries.

~ ANIL'S WORDPLAY

The next several items have one thing in common: Anil came up with them.

His prolificity and variety suggested that I should put a long section of his work in, and here is that section, which reminds me of "The Applesauce Chronicles" by Louis Phillips (Does anyone know where Louis is? I'd like to get him back in the Kickshaws fold.)

-----

* SHE'LL BE RIGHT, MATE.

In Western Australia we don't use daylight saving time. We spend all our time.

-------

* SCRABBLENUMERICS

Dave pointed out in 91-174 that twelve is the only self-referential Scrabble word. Adding up the Scrabble values of its letters equals itself (1+4+1+1+4+1 = 12). (Note that it is also a numerical palindrome.) He suggested increasing the number of self-referentials by using blank tiles (=0) and Scrabble board gimmicks, allowing some letters (and their numbers) to land on double or triple score tiles.

Another way to increase self-referees is to apply alphanumerics to said numbers. In this way I solved every number name up to fifty except zero, nine and ten. For example ONE = 1x1x1 = 1, TWO =-1+4-1 = 2, THREE = 1x4-(1x1x1) = 3, etc. The only number name requiring more than the four basic functions + - x / was FIVE = 4+(1x[square root of 4])-1 = 5. But I was stumped by fifty (4 1 4 1 4) and went no further. I could however solve all these misses by "digital arithmetic": ZERO = 1x0x1x1x1 = 0; NINE = 11-1-1 = 9; TEN = 11-1 = 10; FIFTY = [4.sup.-1+4] - 14 = 50.

* UNFORTUNATE TITLE ON T.V.

"Kids with Tourette's in Their Own Words" (!)

-------

* PUZZLE: What is the pattern in this sequence: 138 243 348 454 600 706 811 916 1022 1128 1233?

* RIDDLE: In what sense does 120 = AD and 145 = AI? What other words can be numbered in this manner?

HINTS TO THE ABOVE PUZZLE

1: The solution lies neither in word play nor in arithmetic.

2: The solution is related to that for this sequence: 106 211 317 422 527 633 738 etc.

3: Take time and think over it and the answer may arise in a flash.

RIDDLE It's related to the puzzle.

-------

* MEANINGFUL WORD STOOL PHRASE (harping back to '02-92)
riddle piddle puddle puzzle
 (How the riddle caused a urine puddle is itself a puzzle.) (Or how a
pool of piss-poor riddles can confuse readers.) (Piddle probly derives
from puddle plus piss.) 


/PUZZLE ANSWER

With properly added colons these are the approximate times when the two hands of a dial clock lie opposite each other and form a straight line. Contrary to simple-minded logic this only happens eleven times per half day, not twelve. The hint 2 sequence (incomplete) is when the two hands overlap. The key words in hint 3 are "time" and "think over it" rather than "think it over".

RIDDLE ANSWER

Replace the numbers 1-12 on a clock face with the letters A-L, an idea suggested by Dave in response to the riddle. Numbers in the riddle represent the times that spell the bigrams. Thus 1[:]20 translates as 1 o'clock = A and 20 (minutes past one, on the 4) = D. Likewise 1:45 = A + I.

Any other A-L bigram can be so expressed. Similarly, four-letter A-L words can be spelt as time intervals, eg, ABLE = eleven hours and fifteen minutes (1:10-12:25).

Other two-letter A-L words include: ah = 1[:]40, be = 225, etc for bi, eh, fa, ha, he, hi, id, if, la. You might also include 20 A-L chemical symbols (+ Be, Bi, He, La already named). Single letter symbols (B C F H I K) are ineligible because, for example, 2:00 = BL, not B.

Jeff Grant's "The Concise Dictionary of 2 Letter Words" (NZ, 2006) gives a 'word' for all 144 A-L bigrams by counting various exotic words, dialects, slang shortenings, etc. (This book is available from Jeff for $US10 including postage at ardra1109@gmail.com.)

------

* SHE'LL BE RIGHT, MATE.

In Western Australia we don't use daylight saving time. We spend all our time.

------

* MORE OVINE RESILIENCE

Ross Eckler's delightful 16-82 article of the same name, offering additional constraint-based rewordings of Mary's Lamb, rekindled my fondness for this genre that he invented. Here's two more.

1. This one was inspired by his pi digits word-length replica of the poem. Instead I replace each word of the original with another word of equal length. It rhymes--but the metre?
Mary Had a Word-Length Replica 
 Lamb, pet o' keeper Mary, "Has bleach!"
 its hairs so glow. She chaperones this tiny lamb o'er vale and
hill--"Up, ho!" As teachers let no animal get ken, lamb's
at venture ban duly. "Ha!" kids say, teasing, their joy high
as sky--O, but's so unruly! 


2. This version was suggested by #1, complementing it in a sense. It's another word-for-word transliteration, this time replacing each word with a synonym or equivalent. Except occasionally I reword a whole phrase--because prepositions usually lack exact synonyms and are capable of producing headaches, which I've sworn off. It's stuffier than #1, sounding downright academic at times. It doesn't even rhyme or scan. In fact, it's been downgraded to prose! omg

Mary Had a Word-Match Replica

Our heroine possessed an ovine kid whose wool existed snowy like cotton. Furthermore, wherever this young girl ventured, her pet felt following to be compulsory. The lamb trailed its owner unto lessons a single time. This occurred contrary to regulations. The eventuality caused young pupils to giggle plus frolic from viewing the sheep in class.

* UNFORTUNATE TITLE ON T.V. "Kids with Tourette's in Their Own Words" (!)

--------

* HOMONYM SYNONYM PYRAMID?
     hi
    hie
    high
    heigh 


These four words are cognates by a stretch: all four can be used to express excitement. They're unrelated except that hi and heigh are both cited as "natural exclamations" and might be variants of the same word deriving from earlier hey. Heigh even has hey as an alternative pronunciation, and Hi and Hey are synonymous greetings.

------

* PUZZLE: What is the pattern in this sequence: 138 243 348 454 600 706 811 916 1022 1128 1233?

* RIDDLE: In what sense does 120 = AD and 145 = AI? What other words can be numbered in this manner?

HINTS TO THE ABOVE: PUZZLE

1: The solution lies neither in word play nor in arithmetic.

2: The solution is related to that for this sequence: 106 211 317 422 527 633 738 etc.

3: Take time and think over it and the answer may arise in a flash.

RIDDLE

It's related to the puzzle.

------

* MEANINGFUL WORD STOOL PHRASE (harping back to '02-92)
riddle piddle puddle puzzle
 (How the riddle caused a urine puddle is itself a puzzle.) (Or how a
pool of piss-poor riddles can confuse readers.) (Piddle probly derives
from puddle plus piss.) 


------

DAVID MORICE

Iowa City, Iowa

ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS

Answer to AUTOMOTIVE NAMEPLAY: In the expanded chain, you have to to change SENTRA (in the original chain) to TUNDRA (in the new chain). Then you change TUNDRA to DATSUN. TUNDRA is the SUV, and DATSUN is the bygone car name. Can anyone expand the change even further?
        SUBARU --> TAURUS --> SATURN --> TUNDRA --> DATSUN 


Answers to DUNG WHISKERS

"Anguish Languish" = "English Language" "Dung Whiskers" = "Tongue Twisters"

1. Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. A peck of pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

2. Betty Botter bought some butter. "But," she said, "this butter's bitter. "If I put it in my batter, it will make my batter bitter!" So Betty Botter bought some better butter.

3. How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

4. She sells seashells by the seashore.

5. I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream.

1. Rubber baby buggy bumpers.

2. The sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick..

Answer to EXPLORING THE BADLANDS

Gondwanaland, the supercontent of 200 million BCE.

PUZZLE ANSWER

With properly added colons these are the approximate times when the two hands of a dial clock lie opposite each other and form a straight line. Contrary to simple-minded logic this only happens eleven times per half day, not twelve. The hint 2 sequence (incomplete) is when the two hands overlap. The key words in hint 3 are "time" and "think over it" rather than "think it over".

RIDDLE ANSWER

Replace the numbers 1-12 on a clock face with the letters A-L, an idea suggested by Dave in response to the riddle. Numbers in the riddle represent the times that spell the bigrams. Thus 1[:]20 translates as 1 o'clock = A and 20 (minutes past one, on the 4) = D. Likewise 1:45 = A + I. Any other A-L bigram can be so expressed. Similarly, four-letter A-L words can be spelt as time intervals, eg, ABLE = eleven hours and fifteen minutes (1:10-12:25).

Other two-letter A-L words include: ah = 1[:]40, be = 225, etc for bi, eh, fa, ha, he, hi, id, if, la. You might also include 20 A-L chemical symbols (+ Be, Bi, He, La already named). Single letter symbols (B C F H I K) are ineligible because, for example, 2:00 = BL, not B.
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Author:Morice, David
Publication:Word Ways
Geographic Code:1U3IN
Date:May 1, 2016
Words:5391
Previous Article:All the brave new palindromes.
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