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Kickshaws November 2013.

~ AN OVERALL UNDERSTANDING

Bill Brandt discusses the difference between two antonyms: "The words 'over' and 'under' seem to describe opposite conditions. There are overachievers and under achievers. You can be overworked or under worked. An underpass is a road that goes beneath an overpass. Clothes worn underneath are things like underwear and under shorts, while clothes worn on the outside, are things like overcoats and overalls. While 'over' sometimes has a positive connotation and 'under' has a negative connotation, something that is overrated may not be as good as something that is underrated. Sometimes they both have a negative connotation, for example food that is either undercooked or overcooked will not taste good. In some cases words that seem to be related are not; for example all undertakings are not done by undertakers.

"There are also many 'over' and 'under' words that do not seem to have an opposite counterpart, such as:
 A conversation can be overheard but never underheard. You can
overlook something, but you cannot underlook something. The weather can
be overcast but never undercast. You can overcome a problem, but if it
is unsolvable it is not undercome. If you pay something late it was
overdue, but if you pay it ahead of time
         it is not underdue. If you are aggressive you can be
overbearing, but if you are restrained
        you are not underbearing. If you are not expected to win you are
the underdog, but if you are
        expected to win you are not the overdog. If you do something bad
it can be called underhanded, but if you do something
        good it is not called overhanded. If you get in the way of
someone working you may be underfoot, but if you are
        not in the way you are not overfoot. If you elect to have
surgery you can undergo an operation, but if you do
        not elect to have the surgery you did not overgo the operation.
When you go where the trees are small you are in the underbrush, but if
        you go where the trees are big you are not in the overbrush. 


~ROSE ATE A STONE TAIL

"Sigh-end-tests lass weak dish-covered sum-cling knew," Bill Brandt writes. "Aston wit rye-dings an tree lane-witches. Eat vast aw gouda cling. Hare east on eggs-ample off watt ate sad."
 N-D AGN C N ILN CT RIIS EE XLNC XAVR DDIRR 2 8 M N X D CT S NN 4D
X D CT FN NE NMLL 4 D M EE XLNC S 2 8 X-NGG
 End die Age-eon see end. Mend see-tea rye-says As excel-and-see
eggs-a-viewer tea-sires two it him an eights Duh see-tea ass hands fur
tea-eights Duh sea-tea ass-ant an-eye an-eye-malls fur tea him As
excel-and-see as two it eights an cheats
In the Aegean Sea an island city rises. His Excellency Xavier desires to
eat ham and eggs. The city has hens for the eggs. The city hasn't
any animals for the ham. His Excellency has to eat eggs and cheese. 


~ GENTLER GENDERS

According to Bill, "the state of Washington recently mandated that some words were too sexist and had to be replaced. In Washington, 'freshmen' are now called 'first year students' and 'penmanship' is now called 'hand writing.' In-some other places firemen are now called fire fighters and policemen are now called police officers. Even the mailman who became the postman is-now called a-mail carrier. I do not know what became of all the fishermen.

"If that kind of emancipation spreads, will we no longer be able to visit Manhattan, Manchester, Manchuria, the Himalayas, or Normandy? Will Hercules need to change-his name? What-happens to all the Hispanic folks? Will they be left with just panic? And what about Hershey? Will the bar be lowered- on- that too? This is all starting-to leave a bad taste in my mouth. Will I no longer be able to eat herbs, herring or a popsicle while I listen to pop music? Will we no longer be able to fly in helicopters, or fill our balloons with helium? Will officers no longer be able to command their troops? Will the doctor no longer be able to treat my hernia? Will l no. longer be able to get a manicure?

"Our language is .part of our human heritage. Is changing the language part of mankind's historical manifest destiny? If so, who has been given the mandate to manage this task? Will a manual be created to document all the changes? It will be a monumental task, but will the person who drafts the manuscript be considered to be a hero? Will the results be popular, or will there be a boycott? "If people do not accept the whole shebang will they be considered to be heretics?

"I don't want to take a shellacking over this, so for the moment I will mind my manners and not create any shenanigans, or appear to go mental over this. I will just-retire to my mansion, become a hermit and not mention this any more."

~ CONSONANTAL PAIRS

Jeremy Morse has been looking in Chambers for "words starting with a pair of consonants. The great majority of them are native English words, deriving from roots in Old German, Old. Ductch, Latin, or Greek. Of the 43 opening, consonantal pairs that they exhibit, 34 might be called common, as follows:
 BL    BLACK BR    BROWN CH    CHASE CL    CLAMP CR    CROAK DR
DRAFT DW    DWARF FL    FLANK FR    FROZE GH    GHOST GL    GLEAM GN
GNARL GR    GRAVE KN    KNEEL PH    PHONE PR    PROOF PS    PSALM PS
PSALM RH    RHYME SC    SCOLD SH    SHALL SK    SKEIN SL    SLUMP SM
SMART SN    SNOOT SP    SPURN SQ    SQUAT ST    STORK SW    SWELL TH
THESE TR    TRUCK TW    TWICE WH    WHERE WR    WROTE 


"The other, rarer 9 all derive from Greek:
 BD    BDELLIUM CN    CNEMIAL CT    CTENOID KL    KLEPTOMANIA KR
KRYPTON MN    MNEMONIC PN    PNEUMONIA PT    PTOMAINE TM    TMESIS 


"But modern English has .become very cosmopolitan, welcoming foreign words to such an extent that the 43 native opening consonant pairs are actually outnumbered by 47 immigrant pairs from 25 foreign languages (including modern German and a U.S. coinage) as follows:
 BH   BHANG           (HINDI) BW   BWANA           (SWAHILI) CS
CSARDAS         (HUNGARIAN) CW   CWM             (WELSH) MH   MHORR
(ARABIC) MR   MRIDANG         (SANSKRIT) MW   MVULE           (SWAHILI)
MZ   MZEE            (SWAHILI) CZ   CZAR            (RUSSIAN) DH   DHOBI
(HINDI) DJ   DJINN           (ARABIC) DS   DSO             (TIBETAN) DV
DVANOVA         (SANSKRIT) DZ   DZIGGETAI       (MONGOLIAN) FJ   FJORD
(NORWEGIAN) GJ   GJU             (OLD NORSE) GW   GWYNIAD
(WELSH) HW   HWYL            (WELSH) JH   JHALA           (SANSKRIT) KH
KHAN            (ARABIC) KV   KVASS           (RUSSIAN) KW   KWEZA
(BANTU) LH   LHERZOLITE      (BASQUE) LL   LLAMA           (QUECHON) LW
LWEI            (BANTU) MB   MBIRA           (SHONA) MG   MGANGA
(SWAHILI) NG   NGAIO           (MAORI) NH   NHANDOU         (TUPI) PF
PFENNIG         (GERMAN) PZ   PZAZZ           (U.S.A.) SB   SBIRRO
(ITALIAN) SD   SDRUCCIOLA      (ITALIAN) SF   SFORZANDO       (ITALIAN)
SG   SGRAFFITO       (ITALIAN) SV   SVELTE          (FRENCH) GM
GMELINITE       (GERMAN) TJ   TJANTING        (INDOESNIAN) TS   TSETSE
(TSWANA) TZ   TZIGANY         (HUNGARIAN) VL   VLEI
(AFRIKAANS) VR   VRAISEMBLANCE   (FRENCH) ZH   ZHO             (TIBETAN)
ZL   ZLOTY           (POLISH) ZW   ZWIEBACK        (GERMAN)" 


~LOUIS PHILLIPS' DICTIONARY

1. Podestrian--a person who walks down the street listening to his or her Ipod.

2. Vaccinema--films devoted to plagues and the spread of disease e.g. Contagion)

3. Rebustibles--falsies

4. Premisses--Female embroyos

5. Prethinking--Thinking before one really thinks

6. Kvetlching--Complaiong about one's fortune as foretold by the casting of Chinese coins

7. Hambrosia--overly sweet pig meat

8. Golfling--making love at night on a golf course

9. Palindrama--a play that makes as much sense if staged from the final act to the first, or the first act to the last,

10. Fastenating obsessed with zippers and buttons

~ QUICK HITS BY LOUIS PHILLIPS

SOCRATES AMONG THE ATHENIANS

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!?!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
           * 


1. The fifth word is fourth in this sentence.

2. If BACKWARDS is written backwards is it still backwards?

3. EVEN contains an even number of letters. Is that odd?

4. Why is UNLIMITED limited to only 9 letters?

5. Have you noticed that when UPSIDE DOWN is spelled out it is usually not upside down.

6. If MISSPELLED is spelled incorrectly does ir remain misspelled?
         * 


DELIVERED ODE REVILED!

YOU WILL UNDERSTAND THIS VERSE MUCH BETTER IF YOU KNOW THAT OPS IS THE NAME OF SATURN'S WIFE
 Up, Ops! Ops hops up. Ops drops Mops. Oops, Ops! 


~ LONG TRANSPOSITIONS

In 1990 Jeff Grant wrote to the Guinness Book of World Records about the possibility of including the 19 letter transpositions

representationalism/misrepresentational

in their Language section. They accepted the evidence provided and the pair appeared in the 1991 edition of the Guinness book under Longest Anagrams (non-scientific).

Recently he realised that this record can be extended to 22,letter words with the pair below:

nonrepresentationalism/nonmisrepresentational

The first term is listed in Random House Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1986, and the second appears in a nice piece of legalese in the transcript of a court case recorded on the Net as follows:

"To argue in. effect, because there are nonmisrepresentational forms of conduct that can in effect constitute illegal procurement irrespective of whether there is a misrepresentation." [www.oyez.orglcases, Kungys v. United States (1986)--Oral Reargument, Transcript]

~ SUPERCHALLENGE

Jeff sent his thoughts on the Kickshaws superchallenge: "To find a transposable first name, last name and city name seems possible but the closest I can find so far is RONALD ARNOLD of DALTON, Georgia (www.whiteapages.com). If only there was one in ORLAND, California!

Still with personal names, this morning in our home town of Hastings, New Zealand, my wife Pat noticed a courier van with the driver's name on the side--RIKI KIRIKIRI. This is of Maori origin. I wonder if there are names longer than 12 letters using just three different letters?

~ SUPERCHALLENGE REPLY

Jim Puder replies to the superchallenge: "In the last Kickshaws, in connection with Jeff Grant's remarkable discovery of an actual person whose 8-letter first name transposes into his 8-letter surname (REGINALD DEARUNG of Hammond, Indiana), you posed a superchallenge to readers, a part of which was to come up with a transposable firest, last and city name. As long as real examples are not insisted upon, this does not seem too hard a challenge. Were we living in an onomastically ideal world, we would expect to find, in the U.S.,

an OREN NERO residing in RENO, Nevada,

a NEMO MOEN mushing in NOME, Alaska,

a LAVONA VALONA abiding in AVALON, California,

a RONALD ROLAND ARNOLD LANDOR living in ORLAND, California,

and a NORMA MORAN and a RAMON ROMAN cohabiting in MANOR, Texas.

Internationally, there spring to mind "ANVIL" ALVIN LAVIN of VILNA (or Vilnius), Lithuania,

hamburger mogul Ray Kroc's Irilsh cousin, ROCK KROC of CORK,

MILA and LIAM LIMA, who send us mail from MALI,

siblings ARNO, ARON, NORA and RONA ROAN of ORAN, Algeria,

and fanatical onomasticist NOEL LENO, who has successively lived in LEON, France, LEON, Spain and, to complete his orthographic trifecta, cosmopolitan LEON, Iowa, which is not only the county seat of Decatur County, but also the home of a major rodeo which for many years now has been voted Iowa's Rodeo of the Year.

"Incidentally, while the foregoing might correctly be referred to as an exercise in onomastics, if it had been limited to personal names only it might have more precisely been called an amusement in anthroponomics. Merriam Webster defines anthroponomy as the branch of onomastics that consists of the study of personal names, and if we wish to impress with our erudition we should probably make a note of this fact.

~ NEW SUPERCHALLENGE

"In musing upon Anil's semantically similar deletion pair plaster / paster," Jim writes, "it occurred to me that there is a third word, pilaster, that is not too far removed, conceptually, from plaster. Of course, real pilasters, being load-bearing structures, would be unlikely to be made of plaster, but what about fake ones? Fake pilasters in a movie set, say, might .easily-be plastered-over wood. Thinking along these illness, I came up with this sentence containing an eight-word addition, cascade:

Isn't Pete's pa Pa's past paste paster, plaster pilaster (pilasters and caryatids both, actually) painter Paul?

"So here's a new superchallenge: Can anyone devise a sentence containing an addition (not a trans addition) or deletion cascade of nine or more words?

~ PRIMING THE CONTRONYM

Browsing in Merriam-Webster's unabridged recently," Jim says, "I came across a prime example of a contranym, one that I don't recall whether contranym connoisseur Anil has-previously noted herein or not. In M-W, the term God's country is given three definitions. The first two, which seem to suggest a 19th century American-origin-for the term., are as follows:

god's country (g usu. cap.)

a: an area of civilization (as a city) away from the frontier

b: a place away from a. city : esp: the open. country

"Oh, my. Not a lot of prescriptive guidance here, is there? I wonder, is there a theologian in the house?"

~ ROCKET BOYS: THE LIMERICK

"Rocket Boys," Ove Michelson explains, "was the title of a 1998 book of memoirs by NASA engineer Homer Hickam, Jr., played by Jake Gyllendaal in the film version titled October Sky. The author explained-that his producer (for Universal Pictures) decided on the anagrammed title (a "cinemanagram") so that it would have greater appeal to female moviegoers.
 Beginning with mere Davy Crockett toys, Then greased, as we
tinkered through sprocket noise,
   But to make something fly
  As in OCTOBER SKY And the anagram taken from ROCKET BOYS? 


~ NAME THE MUSE OF WORDPLAY: A CONTEST

"Can you remember who was the Muse of Word Play?" Anil wonders. "We owe her big and don't even know her name. I propose a naming contest, to be judged by the editor and/or the Kickshaws editor. If you had life and history to live over again, what would you name her?

"Here are my candidates. I'm giving a lot to increase the odds of winning my own contest!
    Muse Um (Um, where she belongs?)
   Logotia ("Logol" for short and for Patindromicon's
sake. For fun if not
           authenticity, it beats Jeff's Pal2 entry for Logol: part
           of a place name in Ethopia.)
   Playmate of the Ear (and eye; aye, I)
   Pollyanagrammasia
   PollyWannaWordCracker
   Arepo (Most apt for the title but not so well known; in fact, nobody
knows
         who s/he was. But s/he sure knew how  to rotate words and
          letters.)
   Polynomnia
   Polyhomnia
   Miseuterpe (not Miss Euterpe)
   Erranus
   Colliady
   Clayo Playo (Muse of Moutding and Modelling Playdough*)
         (*Playdough is the Oz name for modelling clay and signals that
         logotogists don't get paid real money for it. Please send
your
         entries to the Name Our Muse Contest to the Kickshaws editor.
         Prize: pride.)" 


~ PALINDROMIC PERFECTION

Straw? No, too stupid a fad. I put soot on warts.

Anil wants to take another look at the palindrome above: "This, from Bergerson's Palindromes and Anagrams (p. 89), probably by Leigh Mercer, deserves a renewed appreciation. It's my pick as the very best of the long list of pal sentences on pp. 82-92. It's funny and so natural sounding. Soot is hilarious yet totally believable as a typical folk remedy. And it's perfect structurally, using no repeated words, proper names, abbreviations, nonce words or spellings, obscure words or meanings or need to explain, incorrect grammar, unnatural word order or awkward or incomplete sentences that mar other longer palindromes. Perfectionists might complain that the first two "sentences" aren't, grammatically Pfui! I callthem "natural" sentences, totally believable Mod Grammar (which goes back centuries). What's your favourite longer palindrome?"

~ ANAGRAM-UNIT PALINDROME

Deep rival? Sadly, vile evil lady's prevailed.

This new form by Anil "is like a word-unit palindrome but instead of repeating the corresponding words (or phrases) the repeats are anagrams of each other. Successive layers of anagram pairs can be built up from the middle or from the two ends with endless later insertions possible along the way, just like in normal palindroming. If palindroming can be considered normal! (None of my dictionaries even consider it a word!)"

~ CURTAILMENT AND APHORISM

Anil has come up with this logological parody of Dorothy Parker's famous saying "Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses."

Men seldom make dimples in girls who wear pimples.

He wonders if prostitutes with pimples are pimpless.

~ ALL WELL THAT ENDS THE SAME

"Here's a new (?) constraint to play with," Anil writes. "All words must end in the same letter. E would probably be easiest, but t chose Y in honour of Mary to cast the first stoney. As often happens in these affairs, her little lamb got transmogrified into another creature, this time a donkey (hee-haw). If Mary were Australian I'd have used wallaby or bilby."
    MARY FUNKY DONKEY STORY
   Any Mary say, tiny ivory donkey obey.
   Mary journey, donkey journey.
   Mary scholarly, donkey followy. ("Oy! Nay! Noway!")
   Schoolgirl/boy bevy play, gay, say "Donkey funny!
" 


"If you disapprove of non(ce)-words, omit 'noway' and change 'follow'y' to 'falsely scholarly' or any term of your choosy. How about another one, Dave and readers?"

Well, who could resist a challenge like that? /put my computer to paper and came up with the little lamb below. The original Mary and her lamb must be the most parodied poem in logology, written in at least 50 literary constraints, from an E-less lamb to a palindromic lamb. Now, dear reader, read the lamb with E at the tail end. of each word, and. then take your turn. at creating a lamb.
    MARIE, LAMBIE: THE TALE
   Marie, she see little lambie.
   Fleece white like ice,
   Everywhere Marie flee,
   The tambie be there twice. 


~ WHY SO FEW ODD AND EMENWORDS?

Anil has caught below two of the more frazzled of Mary's Lambs: "Surprisingly few words or longer lipograms can be made from letters exclusively spelled with only-the odd or with only the even. letters of the alphabet. Why is neither half good anagram material? Naturally the even letters, being vowelless, should -have none .(except nth), but why not the vowel-laden odd letters? It's the consonants. The best word-forming consonants except s are evens (d h I n p r t), hence wasted without any vowels, and they leave the odds poor in good consonants (c m s w). With the 13 odds (a c e g i k m o q s u w y) the only believable pangram I found was this slice-of-life narrative: "Coy Gem!" I squawk. (praising her vociferously) Much more forced is this hard-earned and hard-to-read odd letters lipogram parody of Mary's Lamb.
    Mawy mamas warn, 'is skim is wi as smow (ice).
   Ewewea Mawy goes, warn is suw go.
   Wam comes scoo--is sock agamc ye game!
   Makes kigc mock warn, squeak gioy. 


"To help restore a little (in)sanity and balance to the odd/even paradox,/took on the perilous task of making sentences and other lipograms from the vowelless even letters (b d f h j I n p r t v x z). The challenge is to make the invisible inferred vowels as obvious and unambiguous as possible, as well as best "covering" for the missing consonants. The peril proved real and all I came up with was this disaster (Mary had to change her name to Betty):
    Bt hd lttl lb, th flz vz vt z zn,
   'N' r-vr-vr tht Bt vnt, d Ib vz zr t fltr.
   Lb fllr hr t zhl n d, vhz z "nt n!"
   Lb zt pplz t lff n pit z lb n zhl. 


"This Kickshaw is offered as a cautionary tale to logologists not to be too foolhardy in forging new front tears."

~MONIQUE AND THE SIX OUTLEX

"The letters J K Q V X Z are ill-loved by English logologists," Anil believes. =They are awkward troublemaking outlaws, aka outlex, 'lex' doubling up as both law (Latin) and word (Greek). They total 23% of the alphabet, yet as initial letters account for only 4% of the dictionary, with a similar low fraction expected overall. Thus they flagrantly violate the law of averages, and for this they get put away for long sentences. Being a softie, I felt they deserved their fifteen minutes of fame (for extremely slow readers), and-feature them-in yet another constrained-parody of Mary Had a Little Lamb. The constraint is that every word contain at least one of these six letters, and all six be used. It wasn't as hard as it sounds. It was harder. Just kidding, it was easier, as my easily produced and easily bettered effort betrays.
    Monique's milky-quitted kid joined Monique's journeys
everywhere.
   Unexpectedly, kid joined Monique extracurricularly,
   Violating jurisprudence.
   Juveniles mocked kid jazzily. 


"Have a go. Can you do one with JQXZ? I couldn't. Maybe if the lamb were a baby ox, quoit or zebra. What if you add W, which is a common first letter but probably rarer than K or V internally?"

~HAIKU SCHMAIKU

Traditionally, haiku are poems with two primary constraints. They should be about or evoke the seasons, and they should be of the 5-7-5 or 17-characters structure, in English construed as 17 syllables. Anil wrote the following, which meets both criteria. He went above and-beyond the call of duty with the seasonal constraint.
    Fall fell, winter went,
   Spring sprang, Summer summed it all.
   (Need more seasons here.) 


~ BEST WISHES from KATH and KIM

Here's a message Anit wishes to relay to our readers from Kath and Kim, an Oz IV show (copied in the US):

"May you have a long and preposterous life."

~A CLASSIC DOUBLE DEALER

sneak = snake

Anil points out that "this well known definitive anagram, in addition to being a single letter metathesis or backward ostrich anagram, has the unusual property that the words are synonyms both as verbs and as nouns yet with different meanings, in parallel. As verbs they are metaphorical synonyms: sneak = snake along silently from bush to bush. As nouns they are parallel derogatory synonyms: sneak = snake in the grass. Their parallel meanings go back at least to Shakespeare. Both origins relate to creeping, snake originally from snail, surprisingly. Yet they seem to be unrelated etymologically, at least as far back as Indo-European where they also have similar but different spellings, (s)negos/(s)nogos (snail, snake) vs. sneig/snig (sneak, creep). Yet in Old Norse snail was snigill. A doublet? Or were they related after all, despite no cross referencing in Web3 or Chambers Dict. of Etymology? Perhaps even earlier-than l-E? Was the sneaky snake in Eden actually a snail? Creepy."

~ SMYNONYMS--A SELF-DEFINING PALINDROME:

palindromists: "St. Simo Rd. N. I lap."

Anil explains that "I go down St. Simo Road North then make a full lap and in the end come back by St. Simo Road South to where I started. Saint Simo is, of course, the patron saint of palindromists, or of simolarity by virtue of reversal."

~ MORE NAUGHTY SLANG

Anil writes that "Jeff Grant's recent daring revelations of some of the filth in Jonathan Green's The Cassell Dictionary of Slang opens the door for another select group therefrom, aided by Green's categorised slang compilation Slang Down the Ages (London: Kyle Cathie, 1993). The following, among many others, all mean masturbation: Onan's Olympics (punishable by death! Genesis 38: 8-10)
    one-legged race
   paint the ceiling
   choke the chook
   bequeath one's genes
   kilt-some babies. 


~ FOR THE QUATTUORDECILLIONTH TIME

Anil and I collaborated on the following big number palindrome. Here it is, followed by an explanation.

"No ill ice, Dr.! Out!": Tau, quattuordecillion.

(A patient identified as Tau, speaking for "a quattuordecillion others," demands that the doctor quit giving them contaminated or harmful ice [or amphetamines?] and leave them atone.)

~ O DOOR!

"Con yoo rood thos sontonco?" (Anil turned all the vowels into O in this Ovation.) "Ot's got oll tho vowols roplocod woth o's. O bot yoo coold wroto o wholo novol thos woy ond ot woold bo protto ooso to rood.

Stotos: Oowo, Goorgoo, Ondoono, Oilonoos, Moono, Monnosoto, Looosoono, Wostorn Oostroloo.

Foor scoro ond sovon yoors ogo, oor forofothors brooght forth .... Mo hoort loops op whon 0 bohold o roonbow on tho sko...

So who do wo bothorhovong fovo ond ono holf vowots? Somo longoogos don't hovo ono.

Sonco rolo, Onot

(Sorro, door roodor, bot ot's o hord hobot to brook onco yoo got goong.)"

~ THE LONGEST PALINDROME

Pan, snap, pan, snap; pan, snap, pan, snap, pan, snap ... etc.

Anil describes this as "Rapid photography or filming. It can be run on and on and on into a record-setting movie-length palindrome. Eat your heart out, Jeff."

~ PALINDROMIC REPLY

In response to Anil's longest palindrome in English, here is the longest in Spanish. It, too, can be extended in both directions to infinity. "Como" can mean "as" and "I eat." It would translate into English in the following way: "... I eat as t eat as I eat as I eat..." Is there another word in any language that would work like this?

... como como como como como como como como como ...

~ PALINDROME SQUARE

Par-in model led omni-rap p q

on relap 'mid dim, paler "no palindrome", p q (p)

"Palindrome and four anagrams thereof (ps and qs)," Anil points out, "team up into a single sentence made up of two p-q pals plus the mother word. It describes the omni-praise for even 'par' palindromes because they fold back on themselves (relap), like good pats everywhere, as everyone knows. This sets them apart from all the dull non-palindromes they find themselves amidst."

~ BEDROOM DRAMA

Pillow, ill pow-pow, ill wollip.

"I this a new form?" Anil wonders. "It's a hybrid palindrome, a word reversal sandwiched between a letter reversal where the former is an anagram of the latter. It's the story of a pillow fight, or perhaps of a lovers' bedroom fist fight--or worse! Wollip is the phonically correct spelling of wallop. A pow-pow is a powwow gone wrong."

~ FFFAAASSSTTT DEPARDIEU

Anil selected this excerpt from article 6 April 2013 about bad boy Gerard Depardieu:

"The actor, 64, was detained in Paris in November after falling off his scooter which he had been driving while more than three times over the limit." (How did he survive at that speed!?)

~ TRANSADDITIONAL IRISH

A logological observation by Anil: "The Irish Prime Minister is called the Taoiseach and the Irish parlaiment the Oireachtas. These Irish-English terms are Irish borrowings. They are obviously related; but in a most unusual, fragmented, non-conspicuous manner. Yet the latter is a transaddition of the former, adding an R. I bet Darryl Francis has noted this before."

~ ANAGRAM POSER

Anil discusses anagrams: "It's generally recognised that the longer a word, phrase, sentence or verse is, the more likely it is to be anagrammable into a good 'definition' or-restatement of itself in different words. Extrapolating to extreme length, how far through could a whole book be anagrammed into another' book of the same size, language and-type of text (fiction, chemistry, etc)? 50%? 99%?

"Anagramming means taking the entire letter pool of book one and drawing down on it to construct book two. Would it be random with respect to which letter or type of letters would run out first, as intuitively expected? Not if mixing types or languages. For example an English book anagrammed into a German one would run out of-Ks and Zs fairly quickly. Two German dictionaries averaged 5.03% K pages and 3.82% Z, while two English dictionaries averaged only 0.87% K and-0.25% Z. Spanish surnames are also-heavily into (terminal)-Zs: Cruz, Diaz, Gonzalez, Lopez, Marquez, etzc."

~ SIX ENGLISH-ROMAN EQUATION PALINDROMES AND ANAGRAMS

Anil provided some Pals (5), which are all-bold, and Anagrams (5), which are half-bold. But first, a bold old non-Roman homophone.
666 Sick, sick, sicks! Six = a I+V=VI axis,
 or simply           I + V = VI. Six (Vt)
 is X - IV,   or Six (VI)
 is Xt - V, or simply           VI = X - IV
,         or VI = XI - V
.
                   VI - II = IV
.
                   Six = X- "I's"
                    (It is X - IIII.
 + It's II x III.)
                   Six + three
 = ? There's IX.
                   Six x three, o genii
, = IX + IX, or's eighteen. 


~ POSSESSIONS

Susan Thorpe has compiled an A-Z list of personages who have relations, entities, or taws etc., linguistically linked to them. The letter X is the most difficult, and only one has been found so far. Can readers find more for X?

AARON'S-ROD, ADAM'S APPLE, ADAM'S R-1B, AESOP'S FABLES, ANNIE'S SONG

BAILEY'S BEADS, BANQUO'S GHOST, BOYLE'S LAW, BURKE'S PEERAGE

CAESAR'S WIFE, CHARLEY'S AUNT, CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE,

CONSTABLE'S HAYWAIN

DONOVAN'S REEF (film), DOWN'S SYNDROME, DRAKE'S DRUM

EARL'S COURT, EVE'S THREAD (plant)

FINGAL'S CAVE, FINIAN'S RAINBOW, FINNEGAN'S WAKE, FOUCAULT'S PENDULUM

GRAY'S ANATOMY, GRAY'S INN, GREGORY'S GIRL, GULLIVER'S TRAVELS

HADRIAN'S WALL, HALLEY'S COMET, HARRY'S GAME, HERNANDO'S

HIDEAWAY, HOWARD'S END, HUBBLE'S TELESCOPE,

IMOGEN'S FACE (British TV), ISAAC'S RAM (a wine)

JACOB'S LADDER, JENKIN'S EAR, JOYCE'S ULYSSES

KELLY'S EYE, KEPLER'S LAW, KING'S RANSOM, KING'S X, KNIGHT'S TALE

LARA'S THEME, LIEBIG'S CONDENSER, LINCOLN'S INN, LOTT'S WIFE

MARLEY'S GHOST, MARTHA'S VINEYARD, MONTEZUMA'S REVENGE, MORTON'S FORK, MUNCHAUSEN'S SYNDROME, MURPHY'S LAW

NELSON'S COLUMN, NEWTON'S APPLE, NEWTON'S RINGS, NOAH'S ARK

OCCAM'S RAZOR, OFFA'S DYKE, OHM'S LAW, ORION'S BELT

PANDORA'S BOX, PARKINSON'S DISEASE, PLATO'S REPUBLIC, PYTHAGORAS'S THEOREM

QUEEN'S BENCH, QUEEN'S RULES

ROSEMARY'S BABY, RORKE'S DRIFT, RYAN'S DAUGHTER

SMILEY'S PEOPLE, SOLOMON'S SEAL (plant)

TARZAN'S REVENGE (film), TURNER'S SYNDROME

ULRICH'S PERIODICALS DICTIONARY, ULZANA'S RAID (film)

VALENTINE'S DAY, VENUS'S COMB (a-cowrie shell)

WELLINGTON'S BOOTS, WHEATSTONE'S BRIDGE

XANTHIPPE'S SHREW (a species of mammal)

YOUNG'S EXPERIMENT

ZERMELO'S WELL-ORDERING THEOREM, ZIPF'S LAW, ZORRO'S MASK

~ NEW BOOKEND WORD--READ ALL ABOUT IT!

Rich Lederer tells about his latest find: "Today I discovered what may be a new bookend word. In our book The Word Circus, we presented 14 eight-letter bookend words that house a four-letter word in the middle and another four-letter word formed from the-bookends of the first and last two letters of the full word. Examples include betrayer = tray + beer and demeaned = mean + deed.

"What I found this afternoon is the 12-letter word chemotherapy, with the six-letter mother in the middle and two three-letter bookends yielding cheapy, which is a recognized variant spelling of cheapie, a penny-pinching person or an inexpensive, often inferior product."

~ ELEMENTAL SYMBOLS

Rich talks about the elements of wordplay: "As far as I can tell, the longest words composed entirely of elemental symbols from the periodic chart are nonrepresentationalism (22 letters), thermophosphorescence (21), professionalisation (19), and, boasting 18 letters each, nonpersonification, oversuspiciousness, insusceptibilities hypertechnicalities, Constantinopotitan, superingeniousness, nonrevolutionafies, supraconsciousness, and irresponsibilities.

"A dozen elements can be spelled entirely in symbols from the Periodic Chart: ArSeNiC, AsTaTiNe, BiSmUTh, CARBON, CoPPEr, IRON, KrYPtON, NEON, PHOsPHORuS, SiLiCoN, TiN, and XeNoN."

~ THE BEs ARE BUZZING

"This hive is buzzing with BEs," Ray Love believes "There are over 60 of them. Note that a few names near the end are capitalized."

BE-GINNINGS

(To-Be or not to Be. That is the question.)

"Below are 15 playful questions that include words that begin with. the sometimes superfluous prefix BE. Some are beguiling, some are bewildering and others are betwixt and between. Some are-beyond belief, but all belong before or behind and beside each other. Now I believe it's time to behold the bedazzlement so I better begin because my brain is becoming befuddled. On-my behalf, please don't begrudge my best efforts."
 If seas can becalmed and skies can beclouded, can rain befallen?
If watches can bejeweled and luggage can bestowed, can laundry soap
betide? If lights can bedimmed and eggs can bedeviled; can fast food
betrayed? If Santa can bewhiskered and packages can beribboned, can
Christmas
        becoming? If bus fare can betokened and alarm clocks can beset,
can town criers bewailed? If martinis can bestirred and beer can
beheaded; can drunks besotted? If reputations can besmirched and
language can befouled, can ill gains begotten? If toes can benumbed and
aches can bemoaned, can tails bedraggled? If women can belaid and
pregnancies can belabored, can babies beheld? If movies can berated and
golf scores can belied, can poets bemused? If sugar can besprinkled and
autumn can befall, can flowers begonias? If midgets can belittled and
fingerpaint can besmeared, can pugilist bedecked? If photographs can
betaken and words can bespoken, can Facebook befriended? If Hazel can
bewitched and Elmer can beFuddled, can Eriksson belief?
       (No, but he can be Leif.) If Satan can beDevil and Christ can be
Jesus, can William beholden? Well I'll bedamned, how befitting that
t can begone! Ray beLoved 


~ NO RHYMERS

Here is Ray's answer to the age old-problem, of unrhymeability.
 Month and silver have no rhymers Or so it's said by old
timers. For purple it's not true. Here, I'll prove it to you:
What will keep a baby from turning purple After nursing? A burp'll.


~ BUMPER STICKER

"I saw a bumper sticker the other day," Ray reports. "It read, 'I took the road less traveled ... now where the hell am I?' An oldie but goodie! Needs to be passed around again."

~ INSCRIPTION

Ray sent the following inscription for a newly published book. It's very colorful. With the availability of desk-top publishing, Ray should sell the inscription to people who've just had a book come out. Perhaps this could be a best-selling inscription.
 May all your skies be blue. May all your lights be green. May all
your hats be white, And may all your books be read! 


On the other side of the coin, here's a parody I wrote as my inscription for Ray's inscription.
 May all your blood be blue. May all your little men be green. May
all your wash be white. And may all your necks be red! 


~ DOUBLE TRIPLE PLAY

A few years ago I found three words (on the left diagonal below) that have different pronunciations of NG in the middle of the word. The words result from two successive additions to the initial letter of ANGER, the starting word. I found a twist that doubles the triple play of letters. In this new set, the second addition is placed after the first letter. Otherwise they both start with ANGER and they have the same pronunciation pattern, as shown in Webster's Third. Can anyone find another example for ANGER or a similar example for a different starting word? Or is this progression unique?
                                  ANGER
                             HANGER  GANGER
                         CHANGER         GRANGER 


~ PHILOSOPHICAL TURKEY IN-THE STRAW

I wrote this poem a few decades ago, and t recently-rewrote -it. If you would like to put in your own two cents worth, just pick two philosophers and write away! In any case, read it as if you. were singing, it--or really do sing it!
    If you wanna get some knowledge
   But you don't know where to start,
   Read an existential essay
   By Jean-Paul Sartre.
   If you think that life is wonderful
   And everything is peachy
   Well, open up a book or two
   By Friedrich Nietzsche.
      Being and essence Dada da da Being and essence Dada da da If you
don ? know Who you might be Then you'd best try Nothingness And you
will see
   If you're hungry for religion
   And you wanna eat a bagel
   Take a bite of luscious cream cheese
   From the mouth of dear old Hegel
   If you swig a drink of water
   From a cracked baptismal font
   And your mouth is still as thirsty
   Say a Hail Mary to Kant
      Being and essence Dada da da ...
   If you're feeling kind of skeptical
   You oughta leave the room
   And find a place to study
   In the home of David Hume.
   If you see that time is flying
   And you want a slower clock
   Here's the key: Just find a liberal
   Like what's-his-name-- John Locke.
      Being and essence Dada da da ...
   If your wife is swigging whiskey
   But she just won't share the bottle
   You can sober up her brain cells
   With the help of Aristotle
   If you're looking for the meaning
   Of a rotten old tomato.
   Just forget-it. There's no purpose.
   You can vegetate with Plato
      Being and essence Dada da da ... 
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Publication:Word Ways
Date:Nov 1, 2013
Words:7346
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