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KROY'S TACTILE SIGNAGE MEETS STRINGENT REQUIREMENTS OF AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

 KROY'S TACTILE SIGNAGE MEETS STRINGENT REQUIREMENTS
 OF AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT
 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Jan. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Kroy Sign Systems, a major manufacturer of architectural interior signage, has drawn on its years of experience producing tactile signage to meet the requirements established by the recently enacted Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) legislation.
 "We have been manufacturing tactile signage as a part of our standard product line for a number of years," said Phil Corse, Kroy vice president of marketing. "In order to help our customers meet the ADA requirements, we studied the act as it relates to signage to make sure our product conforms to the law's stringent standards. Our ADA Tactile Sign Series meets these new regulations for the visually impaired."
 Generally in effect nationwide as of Jan. 26, 1992, the ADA law requires existing, new construction and altered facilities to comply with regulations on the removal of architectural and communication barriers to the disabled. The purpose of the act is to establish and protect the civil rights of individuals with disabilities in the areas of employment, state and local government services, public accommodations and telecommunications.
 Corse noted that the ADA compliance deadlines have taken the business community somewhat by surprise. Commercial property owners are struggling to determine just what impact the ADA will have.
 Facilities unable to achieve full compliance by Jan. 26, 1992 may be able to avoid liability by showing a good faith effort with a written action plan and initial steps toward compliance. Signage is one of the fastest, most cost effective and readily achievable steps toward compliance.
 Kroy's ADA Tactile Sign Series complies with the ADA code for tactile letters, Grade 2 Braille, pictograms and contrasting colors. The signs, while meeting new regulations, also give the design and facilities management professional an attractive and effective alternative.
 The tactile message consists of a thin metal plate with a 1/32 inch raised image relief area, conforming to the new ADA standards. This tactile plate can be combined with any Kroy standard sign frame to achieve the desired facility design. Existing signage can be modified quickly and inexpensively by applying Kroy's tactile plate to the surface.
 After careful review of the new ADA law, Kroy recognized the need for clear interpretation of its intent, definitions, regulations and standards for "removal of architectural and communications barriers." In response to the need, Kroy developed an ADA Information booklet, which guides its dealers through the complex signage provisions of the ADA.
 "Our dealers are getting dozens of phone calls each day asking about ADA signage requirements," Corse said. "Liability is a serious issue under the new law and we feel it is incumbent on us to help our customers comply with a law that will do much to bring the disabled into the mainstream of social and economic life."
 Corse noted that the ADA outlines four distinct signage classifications, including permanent, directional and informational, overhead, suspended overheads and temporary.
 Kroy's room and departmental identification and regulatory signage fall under the "permanent signage" classification which must comply with character proportion, tactile, Braille finish, contrast and mounting requirements.
 Kroy's directional identification and wall mount overhead signage fits in the ADA directional and informational category, which provides direction to or information about a functional space and must comply with character proportion, finish and contrast. Tactile and Grade 2 Braille are not required.
 ADA overhead signage must meet requirements for clearance, character proportion, finish and contrast. Kroy's suspended overheads fit this classification.
 Temporary signage such as menu boards, building directories and tenant identification, are exempt from the ADA guidelines.
 "We're at the forefront of meeting the signage requirements of the ADA," Corse said. "We have taken the responsibility of educating our nationwide network of dealers on the ADA requirements as well as providing comprehensive support. We are pleased to be a part of facilitating fuller participation of America's disabled."
 Kroy Inc., headquartered in Scottsdale, designs, manufacturers and markets a high-quality line of visual communications products including labeling, lettering and print products and signs. Kroy products are used extensively in government and industry by architects, designers, engineers, printers, office personnel and retail customers.
 -0- 1/3/92
 /CONTACT: Suellyn McMillan of Kroy, 602-948-2222/ CO: Kroy Inc. ST: Arizona IN: SU:


KJ-EH -- LA011 -- 6602 01/03/92 17:07 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jan 3, 1992
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