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KINSKI, EX LOCKED IN CHILD-VISITATION BATTLE.

Byline: Marilyn Beck & Stacy Jenel Smith

Nastassja Kinski and her ex-husband, producer Ibrahim Moussa, meet in court today in Los Angeles - over what has became an extremely ugly child-visitation battle in which Kinski has accused Moussa of kidnapping and slapped him with a restraining order.

According to Moussa, the latest round began Dec. 16 when he received word that his father, in Egypt, ``was in a terminal situation after throat surgery'' and wanted to see his grandchildren. Moussa apprised his ex-wife of the situation via attorney, he says, and he and their 11-year-old daughter and 13-year-old son headed for Alexandria, with his promise they would be back before Christmas.

On Dec. 23, he says, the youngsters flew home to Los Angeles. On Dec. 24, Moussa was notified via the U.S. Embassy ``that an arrest warrant had been issued for me for kidnapping, and where are the children?'' Moussa claims authorities were chagrined to learn that the children were already back with their mother - and the charges were dropped.

Kinski responds, ``The way he did it was really like kidnapping; there's no other word for it. He lied to our children, lied to me. He never phoned me before they were on their way. And when they were suddenly gone, I was in a panic.''

According to him, their son and daughter couldn't call Kinski from Egypt to say they were fine; she was unreachable - with her boyfriend Jonathan Krane.

According to her, Moussa took the children on a day when he was scheduled to meet her in court in the already-acrimonious visitation battle. ``It's no accident that he chose that day to go. This is not about the grandfather. We are all very fond of him,'' says Kinski. ``It's about the way he (Moussa) went about taking the children.''

Today, Moussa aims to have his temporarily suspended visitation rights restored, ``and I am confident I will,'' he says.

She says, ``He has a lot of thinking to do, amends to make, changing to do in his behavior. Until he does, being the mother and wanting them to be protected and safe, I will make sure that he is kept at a distance.''

Shipped out

Linda Hamilton returned with her husband, James Cameron, from overseas promotion of his ``Titanic'' movie in time to do no more than 11th-hour promotion for her ABC movie ``On the Line.'' It needs all the help it can get. The David Gerber production is terrific, with Hamilton at her best playing a tough-but-vulnerable cop. But it's airing Thursday opposite ``Seinfeld'' and ``ER'' - and whether it's spun off into a series will depend largely on its ratings. Gerber tells this column, ``I begged the network to give it a different time slot, but it seems to be part of the game. You want to sit down and cry, but you keep going.'' Ironically, even if ``On the Line'' scores the excellent ratings it deserves this week, Gerber still has to convince Hamilton to commit to a weekly show, or he says, ``Maybe even an `On the Line' movie or two a year.'' He figures that in his favor could be the fact that, ``Being married to Cameron and with two kids and all, she might like working each week in L.A.''

Tele visions

They're moving forward on the ``Harlettes'' TV series pilot, being produced by Bette Midler's All Girl Productions and Castle Rock. The Divine Miss M. herself is playing Belle Martin, a k a ``The Diva'' in the pilot - with plans, we understand, to make recurring appearances if it goes to series. The action focuses on her yet-uncast backup trio, made up of two seasoned show-biz pros and a starry-eyed newcomer. They're only considering super singers for the show, so evidently, it'll be heavy on the music.

Sharing the pain

``I had to think more than twice,'' says actress Wendie Jo Sperber about playing a woman in Murphy Brown's breast-cancer support group. The episode, which airs tonight, features actresses (Tracy Nelson, Susan Moore and Marcia Wallace) who, like Sperber, are real-life cancer survivors. ``I was diagnosed just four or five months ago, so it was still very fresh for me when we did the show.''

The former ``Bosom Buddies'' regular reveals she'd actually decided to retire from show business before the ``Murphy Brown'' guesting. ``I was struggling so much emotionally. ... I'm a single mother with two kids, and the kids and their sanity, and my recovery, were most important to me.'' Now, she says she's glad she was able ``to bring it all out of the closet. I'm, knock on wood, cancer-free now and taking preventative precaution therapy. And God knows how many women watching the show will maybe get to a doctor and get detected early so it won't be as devastating as it could be.''

With reports by Stephanie DuBois.

CAPTION(S):

3 Photos

Photo: (1) Natassja Kinski

``He lied ...''

(2) Linda Hamilton

11th-hour promotion

(3) Bette Midler

``Harlettes'' moving forward
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Article Details
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Title Annotation:L.A. LIFE
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Jan 14, 1998
Words:829
Previous Article:TOUGH OFFENSE MAKES FOR `INCREDIBLE' CONTEST.
Next Article:LOVE LETTERS STRAIGHT FROM THE HEART; BRINGING `DEAREST' EFFORTS TO LIFE ON PAPER, STAGE.


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