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KEITHLEY INSTALLS ONE OF ONLY NINE U.S. JOSEPHSON JUNCTION VOLTAGE STANDARDS

 KEITHLEY INSTALLS ONE OF ONLY NINE U.S.
 JOSEPHSON JUNCTION VOLTAGE STANDARDS
 CLEVELAND, Sept. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Keithley (AMEX: KEI) joins the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Lockheed Corporation, and a handful of other large U.S. corporations and government agencies with its recent development of a Josephson Junction Voltage Standard system, one of only nine such systems in the U.S. It is designed to provide a common voltage value that engineers use when calibrating especially sensitive instruments.
 Keithley, a manufacturer of extremely sensitive instruments that measure voltage, current and resistance, installed the new system because new instruments on the drawing board couldn't be calibrated by conventional instruments.
 "New test products under development required the accuracy and resolution of the Josephson Junction system," said Fred Hume, vice president/general manager of the Instruments Division. "Having the Josephson Junction calibration system on site means we no longer need to send the equipment we used to use as a voltage standard to NIST for periodic adjustments to ensure they conform to the U.S. Legal Volt value."
 The U.S. Legal Volt is defined in terms of the voltage generated when microwave radiation is applied to a Josephson Junction, which is a simple electronic device consisting of two layers of a low temperature superconducting material separated by an insulator. The voltage across the Josephson Junction depends very precisely on the frequency of the microwave radiation. Since the radiation's frequency can be determined to great accuracy, this provides a useful definition of the volt.
 It's accurate to within just .00000003 volt (0.03 ppm). This high degree of accuracy is becoming increasingly important, said Hume, as physicists and scientists in general are attempting to measure various objects and phenomena in increasing detail.
 Keithley Instruments is a worldwide company with 750 employees and representatives in more than 40 countries around the world. Its major customers are scientists, researchers and engineers that need to measure very low levels of voltage, current or resistance. An example would be an instrument called an electrometer that can measure current down to fifty attoamps, or roughly watching 60 electrons passing by each second. Other products specialize in speed, capable of taking 1 million readings in a single second.
 Keithley Instruments, Inc. (AMEX: KEI) is a leader in the design, manufacture and marketing of electronic test and measurement instrumentation and data acquisition and analysis hardware and software. Its products and systems are found throughout the world in universities, industrial research laboratories, engineering development departments, quality control areas and on production lines.
 -0- 9/10/92
 /CONTACT: Dennis McFarland of Keithley, 216-498-2721/
 (KEI) CO: Keithley Instruments, Inc. ST: Ohio IN: SU:


BM -- CL003 -- 8339 09/11/92 09:01 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 11, 1992
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