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Italian diamonds: polenta and gorgonzola.

Two classics from Italy--polenta and gorgonzola cheese--work together in these easy-to-make appetizers. You cook coarse-ground polenta (or regular cornmeal) until thick, then spread it evenly in a pan. Stud the polenta with cheese and cut it in the pan to make bite-size diamonds. Just broil to heat, pick up to eat.

Polenta Diamonds

2 tablespoons butter or margarine

1 medium-size onion, finely chopped

5-1/2 cups regular-strength chicken broth

1-3/4 cups polenta (Italian-style cornmeal) or yellow cornmeal

1/2 to 3/4 pound gorgonzola cheese

Melt butter in a 4- to 5-quart pan on medium-high heat. Add onion and cook uncovered, stirring, often, until just beginning to brown, about 7 minutes. Add 4 cups broth, cover, and bring to a boil on high heat.

Mix polenta with remaining 1-1/2 cups broth. Using a long-handled spoon, stir polenta mixture into the boiling broth. Cook, stirring, until thick; mixture spatters and is hot, so be careful. Reduce heat to low; stir until polenta is stiff enough to cease flowing about 10 seconds after the spoon is drawn across the pan bottom, 15 to 20 minutes. At once pour into a buttered 10- by 15-inch pan and quickly spread in an even layer.

Cut cheese into 1/4-inch-thick sticks. Set in parallel rows about 1 inch apart on the polenta, pressing cheese partway into polenta. When polenta is cool, use a long knife or cleaver and cut through polenta between bands of cheese to make rows about 1 inch wide. Cut across rows diagonally at 1-inch intervals to make diamond shapes. (If made ahead, cover and chill up to 2 days; let come to room temperature before proceeding.)

To serve, broil polenta 6 inches from heat until cheese is sizzling, about 5 minutes. If needed, run a knife along existing cuts to separate. With a wide spatula, transfer pieces to a tray. Serve hot or at room temperature. Makes about 100 pieces. Allow 6 or 7 for a serving.
COPYRIGHT 1985 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1985 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Title Annotation:recipes
Publication:Sunset
Date:Dec 1, 1985
Words:328
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