Printer Friendly

It's goodbye to the tie!

Byline: Denis Kilcommons

TIES are on their way out. The prediction comes from a survey by Deal Jungle, a company on the internet, where you don't really need to wear ties anyway.

Three quarters of those asked said the tie was doomed with 50% thinking it would be obsolete in British offices within 20 years - but 25% thought the end would come a lot quicker - within 10 years.

I gave up ties years ago, even though I grew up in an age where they were an essential accessory. In the 1960s every young man wore a tight Italian suit with matching tie and hanky, usually with the hankie a bit of silk or cotton stitched onto a piece of card that was slotted into the top pocket of the suit.

Bobby dazzlers? We thought so. Then came those obscenely wide Kipper ties in the 1970s that matched trousers with enough flare to sail a sloop.

For many years at the Examiner I was fortunate in having an off-diary job that allowed me to dress down, although I kept a tie in a desk drawer for emergencies.

In fact, I started Casual Fridays well before business firms introduced them to improve staff morale.

My Casual Friday started on Monday and lasted all week.

Ties have gone through styles and degrees of popularity for almost 400 years.

Opponents have declared them to be a sign of slavery - slaves wore rings around their necks and wage slaves wear ties around their necks. Now, they are finally on the trapdoor of oblivion. And where else would a noose be?

CAPTION(S):

* DAPPER: When men were men and throats were constricted
COPYRIGHT 2012 MGN Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2012 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 
Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Huddersfield Daily Examiner (Huddersfield, England)
Date:Mar 19, 2012
Words:276
Previous Article:End of an Encyclopaedia era.
Next Article:Vital checks for cancer; COMMENT The policy of honesty. The might of right. The expediency of principle.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters