Printer Friendly

Investigating the role of lysosomal membrane permeabilization in cadmium-induced apoptosis in osteoblast-like cells.

Cadmium is a heavy metal released into the environment primarily through the improper disposal of electronic waste. Human exposure to cadmium is linked to the development of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Our lab researches mechanisms by which cadmium induces apoptosis in bone-forming osteoblasts. One under-investigated area of osteoblast apoptotic signaling is the involvement of lysosomes. We hypothesize that cadmium induces lysosomes to permeabilize, release cathepsins, leading to apoptosis in osteoblast-like cells Saos-2 and MG-63. Cells were treated with 0-10 [micro]M Cd[Cl.sub.2] for 24 or 48 hours. Lysosomal permeabilization was visualized using Acridine Orange and lysosomal protease cathepsin b expression was determined using Western blot. Cd[Cl.sub.2] treated cells were co-treated or pre-treated with cathepsin b inhibitor CA074Me and viability was assessed using MTT assay. Acridine Orange and MTT results suggest that cadmium does not induce lysosomal permeabilization as a cell death mechanism. Western blot analysis suggests that cadmium induces cathepsin b expression, indicating induced autophagy in osteoblasts. This work furthers understanding of cadmium's effect on lysosomal function and its induced toxicity in bone.

Danielle N. Holt, The College of Idaho

Sara J. Heggland, The College of Idaho

COPYRIGHT 2014 Idaho Academy of Science
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2014 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:56TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM OF THE IDAHO ACADEMY OF SCIENCE: THEME: ENERGY, MATERIALS, AND NANOTECHNOLOGY
Author:Holt, Danielle N.; Heggland, Sara J.
Publication:Journal of the Idaho Academy of Science
Article Type:Abstract
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Dec 1, 2014
Words:194
Previous Article:Silsesquioxane hybrid nano-building blocks for improved photoresists in semiconductor technology.
Next Article:A teaching approach at the biology-organic chemistry interface.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters