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Inside Air Travel.

New York (AirGuide - Inside Air Travel) Mon, Jul 8, 2013

Early reports indicate that the Asiana 777 pilots were flying too low and too slow and tried to abort landing The Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 that crashed at San Francisco airport on Saturday was flying "significantly below" its intended speed and its crew tried to abort the landing just seconds before it hit the seawall in front of the runway, the US National Transportation Safety Board said on Sunday July 7. Information collected from the plane's cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder indicated that there were no signs of trouble until seven seconds before impact, when the crew tried to accelerate, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said at a news conference at the airport, reported Reuters. A stall warning sounded four seconds before impact, and the crew tried to abort the landing and initiate a go-around just 1.5 seconds before crashing, Hersman said. "Air speed was significantly below the target airspeed," she said. The crash killed two teenage Chinese students and injured more than 180 people, at least two dozen of them seriously, local officials said. Hersman said it was too early to speculate on the cause of the crash. The data recorders corroborated witness accounts and an amateur video, obtained by CNN, that indicated the plane came in too low, lifted its nose in an attempt to gain altitude, and then bounced along the tarmac after the rear of the aircraft hit a seawall at the approach to the runway. Asked whether the information reviewed by the NTSB showed pilot error in the crash, Hersman did not answer directly. "What I will tell you is that the NTSB conducts very thorough investigations. We will not reach a determination of probable cause in the first few days that we're on an accident scene," she told reporters. Asiana said mechanical failure did not appear to be a factor in the crash. Hersman confirmed that a part of the airport's instrument-landing system was offline on Saturday but cautioned against drawing conclusions from that, noting that the so-called glide slope system was not essential to safe operations in good weather. She said it was a clear day with good visibility. Dr. Todd Curtis of AirSafe.com has a report on the NTSB press conference that was held on Sunday July 7th, the day after the accident, that revealed a variety of preliminary information and photos about the sequence of events that led to the crash. Mon, Jul 8, 2013 AirGuideOnline ISSN 1544-3760

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Date:Jul 8, 2013
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