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Influenza vaccination reduces coronary ischemic events in patients with optimally treated coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a report in the June European Heart Journal.

Influenza vaccination reduces coronary ischemic events in patients with optimally treated coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a report in the June European Heart Journal. "A CAD patient vaccinated against influenza has about 50% less chance to be admitted to the hospital because of coronary reasons," Dr. Andrzej Ciczewski from the Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland, said. In 658 optimally treated patients with CAD, the rate of coronary ischemic events during the 12-month study was significantly lower in the vaccine group (6.02%) than in the placebo group (9.97%), the authors report, and major adverse coronary events tended to occur less frequently in the vaccinated group (3.00%) than in the placebo group (5.87%). The estimated 12-month cumulative cardiovascular death rate did not differ between vaccinate (0.63%) and unvaccinated (0.76%) patients, the researchers said, although vaccinated patients reported influenza-like illness significantly less frequently (8.1%) than did unvaccinated patients (12.9%).

"The mechanism of the beneficial effect of influenza vaccination in CAD is not clear, but it extends over a period of viral circulation," the investigators say. They believe their findings may be attributable not only to a reduction in flu complications but also to a blockade of the immune and inflammatory components of atherosclerosis.
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Title Annotation:RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY
Publication:MondayMorning
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jun 30, 2008
Words:209
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