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Increased shipping likely to accelerate climate change as Arctic warms.

Washington, Oct 26 (ANI): Scientists have revealed that as the ice-capped Arctic Ocean warms, ship traffic will increase at the top of the world.

And if the sea ice continues to decline, a new route connecting international trading partners may emerge - but not without significant repercussions to climate, says a U.S. and Canadian research team that included a University of Delaware scientist.

Growing Arctic ship traffic will bring with it air pollution that has the potential to accelerate climate change in the world's northern reaches. And it's more than a greenhouse gas problem -- engine exhaust particles could increase warming by some 17-78 percent, the researchers say.

"One of the most potent 'short-lived climate forcers' in diesel emissions is black carbon, or soot," said James J. Corbett professor of marine science and policy at UD, and is also a lead author of the first geospatial approach to evaluating the potential impacts of shipping on Arctic climate.

"Ships operating in or near the Arctic use advanced diesel engines that release black carbon into one of the most sensitive regions for climate change."

Produced by ships from the incomplete burning of marine fuel, these tiny particles of carbon act like 'heaters' because they absorb sunlight-both directly from the sun, and reflected from the surface of snow and ice. Other particles released by ship engines also rank high among important short-lived climate forcers, and this study estimates their combined global warming impact potential.

To better understand the potential impact of black carbon and other ship pollutants on climate, including carbon dioxide, methane and ozone, the research team produced high-resolution (5-kilometer-by-5-kilometer) scenarios that account for growth in shipping in the region through 2050, and also outline potential new Arctic shipping routes.

The study, "Arctic Shipping Emissions Inventories and Future Scenarios," is published in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. (ANI)

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Publication:Asian News International
Geographic Code:0ARCT
Date:Oct 26, 2010
Words:321
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