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In an Emergency, Who You Gonna Call? IP911 Resource Discusses VoIP 911 Technologies.

DALLAS, Oct. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- As Voice over Internet Protocol continues to grow in popularity, we're beginning to see both the many advantages and shortcomings the technology offers. The mobility that VoIP provides is unlike anything we've ever seen. However, the packets of sound that travel across phone lines can't send any location information, making it impossible for emergency 911 officials to find a caller. With the FCC mandated November 28 deadline fast approaching, many VoIP providers are rushing to create a 911 solution. However, these solutions are unreliable, because a specific location cannot be identified.

"A VoIP service provider can't afford to scrimp when it comes to supplying 911 capabilities," said Mike Smith, managing partner for IP911 Resource. "The safety of their customers always should be priority number one, and with the FCC mandated deadline fast approaching, many VoIP service providers hurriedly are producing 911 solutions."

Most telephone service providers rely on Public Safety Answering Points (PSAP) that are equipped to receive 911 calls. PSAP operators take emergency calls, identify the caller's location, request the program to match the PSAP with the caller's area and then initiate a three-way call with the appropriate emergency response operator.

This solution has several drawbacks. PSAPs rely on databases containing names, phone numbers and addresses. Currently, PSAPs serve only 67 percent of all U.S. households. Not only do these answering points miss more than 30 percent of the population, but also the accuracy of the information can mean the difference between life and death. If your information is incorrectly stored in the database, emergency crews will be unable to locate you.

These points also take away VoIP's greatest asset: mobility. If you need to make an emergency call away from home, PSAPs may receive your home address and send crews to that location. When traveling, you must tell the operator where you are. However, what if you are unable to speak because of the nature of your emergency? How then will emergency workers find you?

IP911 Resource has been working on providing Superior911 (S911) capabilities for more than four years -- far before the FCC November 2005 deadline. In fact, in August, IP911 Resource received the only known patent for VoIP 911 technology. The patent protects the concept of using GPS information during a VoIP 911 call and is the basis for S911.

The technology, which also can be applied in mobile phones, relies on GPS capabilities, allowing emergency officials to locate you without relying on an incomplete database or you having to give an operator your location. The S911 solution also preserves the key advantage of VoIP -- mobility.

"Having the ability to call 911 has, and always will be a necessity, no matter what type of phone service a caller is using," Smith said. "And if providers want to offer VoIP to their customers, a 911 solution is especially important; even if most customers don't look for this capability, it's what they expect. IP911 Resource is committed to providing comprehensive 911 capabilities to everyone on a VoIP connection."

About IP911 Resource

IP911 Resource is a Dallas-based company that has created a breakthrough emergency call technology via VoIP. The company currently holds the first, and only, patent on E-911 technology. The VoIP 911 solution, also referred to as Superior911 (S911), relies on GPS technology to pinpoint a caller's location.
 Contact:
 Michelle Owens
 M/C/C for IP911 Resource
 972-480-8383 x. 224
 Michelle_Owens@mccom.com



CONTACT: Michelle Owens of M-C-C, +1-972-480-8383, ext. 224, or Michelle_Owens@mccom.com , for IP911 Resource; or Mike Smith of IP911 Resource, +1-972-504-6621, or msmith@IP911resource.com

Web site: http://www.ip911resource.com/
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Date:Oct 17, 2005
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