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ITC FINDS LIKELY INJURY FROM ITALIAN AND JAPANESE GRAIN-ORIENTED ELECTRICAL STEEL

 WASHINGTON, Oct. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. International Trade Commission today determined that there is a reasonable indication that imports of grain-oriented electrical steel from Italy and Japan are injuring or threatening injury to domestic producers.
 The commission voted unanimously to continue the unfair trade investigations that began on Aug. 26, 1993, when two U.S. companies, the United Steelworkers of America (USWA), AFL-CIO, and independent unions formally petitioned the U.S. government to impose antidumping and countervailing duties. The vote was 6-0 to continue the case against Japan and 5-0 to continue the case against Italy. (Commissioner Watson recused himself from the case against Italy).
 Specifically, Allegheny Ludlum Corporation, headquartered in Pittsburgh, and Armco Inc., headquartered in Parsipanny, N.J., joined by the USWA and the independent unions at Armco plants in Butler, Pa., and Zanesville, Ohio, requested that the U.S. government impose both antidumping and countervailing duties on imports of grain-oriented electrical steel from Italy. Allegheny Ludlum and Armco are the sole domestic producers of grain-oriented electrical steel.
 In addition, Allegheny Ludlum Corporation and the USWA petitioned the U.S. government to assess anti-dumping duties on imports of grain- oriented electrical steel from Japan.
 "We are pleased that the ITC has preliminarily found that electrical steel imports are injuring our companies and workers. We are confident the Commerce Department will confirm dumping and unfair subsidization by foreign importers," a Specialty Steel Industry of the United States (SSIUS) spokesperson said. Once the ITC determines injury, Commerce proceeds to calculate the dumping and subsidy margins.
 "We believe the dumping and subsidy margins in these cases are huge," according to David A. Hartquist of the Washington law firm Collier, Shannon, Rill & Scott, representing petitioners. "We calculate the Japanese to be dumping at the rate of over 30 percent and the Italian dumping margin to be over 60 percent. The massive Italian government subsidies could result in an additional countervailing duty margin of about 100 percent. The U.S. government will impose additional customs duties in these amounts, assuming we are successful at Commerce," he said.
 -0- 10/6/93
 /CONTACT: Bert Delano, 412-394-2813, or Meg Mullery, 202-342-8439, both for the Specialty Steel Industry of the United States/


CO: Specialty Steel Industry of the United States; U.S.
 International Trade Commission ST: District of Columbia IN: MNG SU:


KD-DC -- DC011 -- 9298 10/06/93 11:23 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 6, 1993
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