Printer Friendly

IT'S NOT ABOUT RECORDS KRAYZELBURG WINS 200 BACK.

Byline: Karen Crouse Staff Writer

INDIANAPOLIS - Swimmers at the world-class level are plumbers trying to get more out of leaky faucets. Their time drops come in maddening trickles, hundredths-of-a-second at a splash. Unless, of course, the improvements dry up altogether.

Lenny Krayzelburg isn't simply a world-class swimmer anymore, he's a world record holder. That means every time the Studio City resident goes to work, he's got a lot of people breathing over his shoulder, fully expecting him to turn that trickle into a torrent.

Swimming in the fish bowl that is the U.S. Olympic Trials caught up to Krayzelburg Monday, though nobody in the water could. The Trojan Swim Club standout won the 200-meter backstroke at the IUPUI Natatorium in 1 minute, 57.31 seconds. That was a new Olympic Trials record but well off his year-old world record of 1:55.87.

Aaron Peirsol, a 17-year-old from Irvine, finished second in 1:57.98. The senior-to-be at Newport Harbor High had set the Olympic Trials mark (1:57.93) in Sunday's semifinals after having handed Krayzelburg his first defeat in the event in three years at a meet at USC last month.

``This is the hardest part right here,'' Peirsol said. ``It's almost downhill from here. The pressure is off.''

That's easy for Peirsol to say. Like U.S. butterflyer Tom Malchow and individual medley specialist Tom Dolan, Krayzelburg can confirm that being the world record holder ``definitely adds a little more pressure because everybody expects you to go out and beat it every time you swim.

``You just have to come to terms with it,'' Krayzelburg said. ``You have to realize that maybe at this level, winning is more important than a world record.''

If sweeping the 100 and 200 in a stroke at these Trials was easy, more swimmers would have done it. As it is, Krayzelburg, 24, who won the 100 backstroke on Friday, is the only stroke specialist so far to pull it off.

Ed Moses set an American record in the 100 backstroke and finished fourth in the 200; Kristy Kowal, who set an American record in the 200 breaststroke Monday, was third in the 100; Jenny Thompson, who lowered her own American record in the 100 freestyle, didn't try to qualify for the 200. And so on it has gone.

``I'm really encouraged that I was able to do it,'' Krayzelburg said. ``I know I can do better in Sydney by a lot.''

Amanda Beard had been encouraged by her swims in the heats and the semifinals of the 200-meter breaststroke. And yet the darling of the 1996 Olympics knew everybody assumed she was done.

The 19-year-old wasn't so sure everybody wasn't right. The 1996 triple Olympic medalist was eighth in the 100 on Friday. The fact she couldn't quite shake was that no female Olympian in the stroke had made a second U.S. Olympic team team since Susan Rapp qualified for a third in 1988.

Beard changed all that with a strong second 100 that left her second in the 200, behind Kowal but ahead of the 100 winner, 16-year-old Megan Quann.

``After my 100, it was really hard for me to bring myself back here and swim the 200,'' Beard said. ``I really tried to crank out the third 50 and I was actually getting goose bumps the last 50, I was getting so excited.''

It meant a lot to Beard to earn a berth to Sydney and not just because she will be reunited with her boyfriend, Ryk Neethling, a distance swimming star from South Africa who attends Arizona with Beard.

``Take `96 and times it by 100 and that's exactly how I'm feeling,'' Beard said. ``This is nothing like `96. I didn't even know what the Olympics were all about then. I was not really expected to make it back. In the back of my mind I was thinking it was going to be hard for me.''

Gary Hall Jr. and Hart High product Anthony Ervin made a sub-22 second 50 freestyle look really easy. Hall and Ervin, who train together in Phoenix, clocked 21.91 and 21.92, respectively, to lead tonight's eight finalists. Kevin Clements of Industry Hills finished third in the 200 individual medley, missing an Olympic berth by one spot and 1.7 seconds.

CAPTION(S):

photos

Photo: Studio City's Lenny Krayzelburg prepares for the 200-meter backstroke Monday at the U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials in Indianapolis. Krayzelburg won in 1:57.31

Michael Conroy/Associated Press
COPYRIGHT 2000 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2000, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Sports
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Aug 15, 2000
Words:754
Previous Article:BRIEFLY BALLOTS WILL BE FULL IN LOCAL ELECTIONS.
Next Article:BIG WIGS BEEF UP PHYSICAL TRAINER CATERS TO CORPORATE CLIENTELE.


Related Articles
LIKE GOLD IN THE BANK MANY HAVE VESTED INTEREST ALREADY IN KRAYZELBURG.
ONLY TIME A THREAT TO KRAYZELBURG.
THE SON RISES THE KRAYZELBURGS, IMMIGRANTS FROM UKRAINE SEEKING RELIGIOUS FREEDOM AND OPPORTUNITY, PRODUCED A FINE PERSON - AND ONE OF THE WORLD'S...
TEARS OF GOLD KRAYZELBURG'S DREAM REALIZED.
SWIMMING: KING, QUEEN ADD TO THEIR RICHES POPULAR KRAYZELBURG, DE BRUIJN WIN MORE GOLD.
BACKSTROKING HIS WAY TO AN AMERICAN DREAM KRAYZELBURG'S THREE GOLDS COMPLETED A LONG JOURNEY.
MAGICAL WEEK FOR KRAYZELBURG.
QUANCE SETS SECOND MEET RECORD IN TWO DAYS.
LENNY'S LOVIN' LIFE INJURIES CAN'T STOP KRAYZELBURG COMEBACK.
NO MEDAL, BUT ALWAYS A CLASS ACT KRAYZELBURG 0.02 SHY OF BACKSTROKE BRONZE.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters